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Published by VegettoEX
28 June 2017, 9:52 AM EDTComment

Dragon Ball Heroes: Ultimate Mission X for the Nintendo 3DS — the third and latest portable entry supporting the over-six-years-old, still-going-strong, card-based arcade game — launched in Japan 27 April 2017. According to the Media Create sales list for the reporting period of 19 June 2017 to 25 June 2017, the game pushed an additional 3,084 copies during its ninth week on sale, bringing its total sales to 170,134 copies in Japan.

By comparison, the original Ultimate Mission had sold roughly 170,000 copies by its respective ninth week in April 2013, while Ultimate Mission 2 had done just under 150,000 copies by its respective ninth week in September 2014. The most recent Nintendo 3DS game prior to Ultimate Mission X‘s release — Ganbarion’s Dragon Ball Fusions — had pushed just over 170,000 total copies by its respective ninth week last fall.

Dragon Ball Heroes: Ultimate Mission X received a Version 1.1 update last month adding a new Tenka’ichi Budōkai mode. As with the previous Dragon Ball Heroes games on the Nintendo 3DS, no international localization has been announced for Ultimate Mission X.

Published by VegettoEX
27 June 2017, 12:40 PM EDTComment

Spoilers: most characters in Dragon Ball do not have surnames! Additional spoilers: some of the characters you think absolutely do not have a surname may in fact have a secret surname! Join us for a tour of the Dragon World’s family names, from the initial Journey to the West borrows up through the series’ later ancillary material.

孫悟空

SHOW DESCRIPTION:
Episode #0426! Mike and Jake discuss surnames in the Dragon World. In a series where most characters do not actually have family names, how can you tell for sure when someone might actually have one? What examples tend to confuse fans, and which names might be hiding a secret surname away?! A bit of news recap and a related “Journey to the West” excerpt round out the episode!

REFERENCED SITES:

Enjoy! Discuss this episode on the Kanzenshuu forum, and be sure to connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Google+, and Tumblr.

Our podcast feed is available via iTunes and/or Google Play Music. You can also listen to this episode by directly downloading the MP3, or you can listen on YouTube and/or SoundCloud.

Published by VegettoEX
23 June 2017, 10:12 AM EDTComment

This week’s August 2017 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine reveals an 07 September 2017 Japanese release date alongside the previously-announced ¥6,800 retail price for the Nintendo Switch port of last year’s Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2 video game.

As initially revealed in last month’s issue of V-Jump, the Nintendo Switch version in Japan will — for a limited time — come packaged with the original story mode (“Legend Patrol”) from 2014’s first Dragon Ball XENOVERSE game. The physical version will include this addition through its 31 December 2017 printing, while the download edition will include the bonus through 27 December 2017. It has been specifically noted that only the story missions will be available; the first game’s Toki Toki City is not included, and certain circumstances may appear slightly different.

Beyond this first-printing bonus, those who pre-order the game will also receive a download code to unlock 87 additional playable characters immediately; paid downloadable content characters are not included as a part of this bonus. The downloadable version of the game will contain this pre-order bonus up through 03 October 2017.

Shueisha and Bandai Namco are running a contest with both Weekly Shonen Jump (tickets in the 2017 #34 and #35 issues) and V-Jump (ticket in the August 2017 issue) where 318 lucky individuals will receive the game and all presale bonuses on launch day. The entry deadline is 14 August 2017. The number “318” in the contest references a popular number pun for fans of the series, where the individual numbers can be quickly read and stretchingly-interpreted as “3” (sa), “1” (i), and “8” (ya); March 18 each year is typically “celebrated” as “Saiyan Day”.

The game’s official website has also updated with a slew of technical details for the Switch version:

  • In television mode, the game will run at a maximum of 900p (1600×900), while in portable mode it will run at 720p (1280×720)
  • Standard one-on-one fights will run at 60 frames per second, while other gameplay will run at 30 frames per second
  • The game will support up to six players online, and will require a paid subscription to Nintendo’s online service when it launches (similar to other platforms)
  • Additional downloadable content is not included by default, but will be available on the Nintendo eShop (similar to other platforms)
  • There will be minor adjustments to certain items and objects in comparison to versions on other platforms
  • Specific Switch functionality includes the ability to take screenshots, special attacks with motion control, one-on-one battles with Joy-Cons, and the immediate inclusion of Goku Black as a playable character along with Tao Paipai’s pillar as a flying mount in Conton City (items which previously debuted as “Day One” bonus items on other platforms)

Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2 is currently available worldwide for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. In North America, the game launched for consoles 25 October 2016 with a PC release following 28 October 2016. In Europe, the game launched across all platforms 28 October 2016. In Japan, the game exclusively launched on the PlayStation 4 console 02 November 2016. The Nintendo Switch port has been announced for worldwide distribution, though only its Japanese release date has been announced so far.

Published by VegettoEX
23 June 2017, 9:48 AM EDTComment

In conjunction with this week’s August 2017 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine and a live stream held by Bandai Namco’s North American branch yesterday, the company has revealed a 27 June 2017 release date for the upcoming fourth paid downloadable content pack for the Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2 video game.

Merged Zamasu and Super Saiyan God Super Saiyan Vegetto (“Vegetto Blue”) had previously been announced within the pages of V-Jump and in a promotional video, while the latest issue details a new storyline and more.

The fourth downloadable content pack will contain:

  • New playable characters: Merged Zamasu, SSGSS Vegetto
  • New story: “Warrior of Hope” arc
  • New stage: “Ruined Future”
  • Three new parallel quests
  • Five new special moves
  • Two new sets of costumes
  • Five new “Super Souls”

A free content pack is also set to launch alongside the paid content, including:

  • Giant Ape suit, hat, and tail
  • Saiyan tail
  • Yajirobe’s outfit
  • “Majin” mark (only usable with human-types)
  • “Original Work” preset outfits from the “Future Trunks arc” of Dragon Ball Super: SSGSS Goku, SSGSS Vegeta, future Trunks, and young Trunks
  • Five new techniques
  • Two raid bosses: “Future Trunks arc”, Bojack

While items can be purchased as the TP Medal Shop, certain items will also be available through in-game events.

The first paid downloadable content pack was released 20 December 2016, with the second pack following 28 February 2017, and the third pack following 25 April 2017. Downloadable content packs are included in the cost of the game’s season pass, which is available for $29.99 and covers these four content packs.

Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2 is currently available worldwide for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. In North America, the game launched for consoles 25 October 2016 with a PC release following 28 October 2016. In Europe, the game launched across all platforms 28 October 2016. In Japan, the game exclusively launched on the PlayStation 4 console 02 November 2016. The game was also recently announced for the Nintendo Switch.

Published by VegettoEX
23 June 2017, 9:05 AM EDTComment

The upcoming 2017 #30 issue of Shueisha’s Weekly Shōnen Jump is set to reveal the future version of Trunks as a playable character in the upcoming Dragon Ball FighterZ video game, offering little more than a single screenshot and a brief splash confirming said appearance (トランクス参戦!! Torankusu sansen! !; “Trunks Joins the Battle!!”).

When specifically asked about Trunks (as well as the potential for weapons such as swords) during an interview with Twitch during E3 last week, producer Tomoko Hiroki laughed and pivoted away saying they could not go “too deep into that yet”.

Trunks joins the cast of previously-announced characters including Goku, Vegeta, Freeza, Cell, Gohan, and Boo.

UPDATE: Bandai Namco’s official Dragon Ball video games Twitter account later posted a different screen shot also confirming Trunks’ upcoming appearance in the game, with a special move mirroring that of his defeating #14 in the seventh Dragon Ball Z film.

The 3-on-3, “2.5D” fighting game is set for an “early 2018” release worldwide and is under development by Arc System Works for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC (via Steam). The game is advertised as running at a 1080p resolution and 60fps frame rate, with higher resolutions available on the PlayStation 4 Pro and Xbox One X consoles. According to the company’s European branch, a closed beta on the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One will be available, “before end of summer”.

Arc previously worked on Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butoden for the Nintendo 3DS, as well as the Super Sonic Warriors games (Bukū Tōgeki and Bukū Ressen) on the Nintendo Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS. The developer is otherwise known for their Guilty Gear and BlazBlue series of fighting games.

Published by VegettoEX
22 June 2017, 9:09 AM EDTComment

FUNimation’s Dragon Ball Z Kai: The Final Chapters – Part Three DVD and Blu-ray box set hit shelves this week, wrapping up the company’s release of the “refreshed” Dragon Ball Z television series (pending, of course, any additional “season” collection sets that will likely come in the future).

Many fans noticed two insert songs not included in previous editions of the series: Masatoshi Ono’s “Let It Burn” in episode 158, and FLOW’s “CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA” (specifically its English version) in episode 167.

These insert songs were not present in the original Japanese broadcast, but perhaps most notably, also not present in the French home video release. In both cases, standard pieces from Norihito Sumitomo’s new musical score were used in their respective scenes.

The Boo arc of Dragon Ball Kai was initially conceived as an international-only product, but following the cancellation of the Toriko television series, Toei and Fuji TV used the available timeslot — which itself previously belonged to the original 2009-2011 run of Dragon Ball Kai — for the Boo arc. What aired on Japanese television was actually a further-condensed edit of what was being produced for the international market; this international edition would later come to be known as “The Final Chapters”.

“Let It Burn” was developed as a vocal song for the international edition, but had up until this point never actually appeared in the series, instead only showing up in a French-only digital soundtrack release (making its non-usage in the French home video release all the more perplexing).

FLOW’s cover of “CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA” (the first opening theme to the original Dragon Ball Z television series) was used as the closing theme to the 2013 theatrical film Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods. Curiously, the band’s own English version of the song (as well as their English version of “HERO ~Song of Hope~”, an insert song from the same film) was reinserted into various international editions of the film, including the Hong Kong release (and its Cantonese dub), as well as FUNimation’s American release (in both the English and Japanese language tracks). Even more strange in context, the original Japanese version of the song was used as the opening theme — even in America — in the 2014 and 2015 video games Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Z and Dragon Ball Xenoverse, respectively.

Published by VegettoEX
21 June 2017, 9:09 AM EDTComment

Dragon Ball Heroes: Ultimate Mission X for the Nintendo 3DS — the third and latest portable entry supporting the over-six-years-old, still-going-strong, card-based arcade game — launched in Japan 27 April 2017. According to the Media Create sales list for the reporting period of 12 June 2017 to 18 June 2017, the game pushed an additional 3,598 copies during its eighth week on sale, bringing its total sales to 167,050 copies in Japan.

By comparison, the original Ultimate Mission had sold just over 160,000 copies by its respective eighth week in April 2013 where it ultimately fell off the sales charts for a bit, while Ultimate Mission 2 had done just under 146,000 copies by its respective eighth week in September 2014. The most recent Nintendo 3DS game prior to Ultimate Mission X‘s release — Ganbarion’s Dragon Ball Fusions — had pushed 165,696 total copies by its respective eighth week last September.

Dragon Ball Heroes: Ultimate Mission X received a Version 1.1 update last month adding a new Tenka’ichi Budōkai mode. As with the previous Dragon Ball Heroes games on the Nintendo 3DS, no international localization has been announced for Ultimate Mission X.

Published by VegettoEX
21 June 2017, 8:35 AM EDTComment

Continuing onward from the previous chapters, Viz has added their English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s twenty-fifth chapter to their website, continuing the “Future Trunks arc” of the manga. This continues the recent initiative of Viz simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut, which saw its release today in the August 2017 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine in Japan.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015 as a promotional tie-in for the television series. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ twenty-fifth chapter coming today in the magazine’s August 2017 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc to act as further promotion for the television series. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition last month.

The Dragon Ball Super television series now receives weekly simulcast streams on services such as Crunchyroll and Daisuki. FUNimation has also announced their American distribution license for the series, with the English dub beginning earlier this year on Cartoon Network, and the first home video release coming in July.

Published by VegettoEX
19 June 2017, 3:11 PM EDTComment

Japanese band Lacco Tower has announced that their next albumHaruka (“Far Away”) — will hit shelves 23 August 2017 for ¥3,000 plus tax.

The album’s title track is set to debut next month as the ninth ending theme to the Dragon Ball Super television series. Lacco Tower previously contributed the song “Light Pink” as the third ending theme to the series.

While most of the series’ ending theme songs have received dedicated CD singles, The Collectors’ song “An Evil Angel and Righteous Devil”Dragon Ball Super‘s seventh ending theme song — also debuted as part of a full album release.

Haruka (“Far Away”; COCP-40093) is currently available for pre-order on Amazon Japan.

Published by VegettoEX
19 June 2017, 1:52 PM EDTComment

You could be forgiven for writing things off as “another year, another fighting game announcement”. This particular reveal, however, was so up our alley that it snapped us right back out of podcast hibernation! Dragon Ball FighterZ has been announced for an “early 2018” release, is a 3-on-3 fighting game on a 2D playing field, and is under development by Arc System Works. For those of us that remember a time before free-flight “DBZ simulator” games, it appears that our prayers have been answered.

SHOW DESCRIPTION:
Episode #0425! Mike, Ryan, and Josh preview “Dragon Ball FighterZ”, the new fighting game coming in 2018 from Arc System Works. Based on the E3 demo, how is the game feeling so far, and what is it doing to separate itself from previous franchise entries? A tease of new and forthcoming website content rounds out the episode!

REFERENCED SITES:

Enjoy! Discuss this episode on the Kanzenshuu forum, and be sure to connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Google+, and Tumblr.

Our podcast feed is available via iTunes and/or Google Play Music. You can also listen to this episode by directly downloading the MP3, or you can listen on YouTube and/or SoundCloud.