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Published by VegettoEX
23 February 2018, 9:04 AM ESTComment

Following up on another tease in this week’s April 2018 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine in Japan, Bandai Namco has announced a 28 February 2018 American and European release date for the “Extra Pack Set 2” coming to Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2 on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC, and Nintendo Switch.

The pack will include four new playable characters: Fu (a thus-far-unused character originally developed for Dragon Ball Online), Son Goku (Ultra Instinct), Jiren, and #17 (Dragon Ball Super ver.). Additionally, the pack will include five new parallel quests, eight new skills, and eight new Super Souls along with mentor team-ups and new “Tokipedia” gameplay routes.

Developed by Dimps for Bandai Namco, Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2 is available worldwide for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC (via Steam), and Switch. In North America, the game launched for consoles 25 October 2016 with a PC release following 28 October 2016. In Europe, the game launched across all platforms 28 October 2016. In Japan, the game launched on the PlayStation 4 console 02 November 2016. The Nintendo Switch port was released in Japan and internationally in September 2017.

The game’s two “Extra Packs” are not covered by the game’s original “season pass” and must be purchased separately (or for $16.99 together in a bundle).

Published by VegettoEX
23 February 2018, 8:31 AM ESTComment

The official Dragon Ball website’s twenty-ninth entry in “The Nearly Complete Works of Akira Toriyama” — an on-going series highlighting rare and important pieces of the author’s work over the years — is page 138 from the 2003 anime guide book, Son Goku Densetsu, featuring Toriyama’s updated character designs for Bardock and his crew from the 1990 television special, as well as King Vegeta:

Most of these designs were originally seen in 1995’s sixth Daizenshuu, “Movies & TV Specials”. Alongside the designs, Toriyama provided brief notes with his thoughts on potential colors and names:

My personal thought is that Saiyan hair is black, but I also planned for them to have distinguishing features, so I changed them like this. But since it seems like you want the colors to be a little more varied, I won’t mind, even if it’s not black. (I’ve selfishly gone and changed the names, as well…)

The Son Goku Densetsu caption also notes that it seems Toriyama did not draw King Vegeta’s entire body or costume.

These designs are actually updated from original ones provided by character designer and animator Katsuyoshi Nakatsuru, which are shared earlier on page 102 of Son Goku Densetsu. It was here that we — seemingly! — got our first glimpse at these original designs and names. While Jaga (who would become Totapo) remained relatively close to the design and name pun (jagaimo meaning “potato”), Tomah (Toma) received a haircut and a different syllable emphasis, Pumbkin (Panbukin) received a slightly rearranged name and much more width, and Korn (Selypa) received an entire overhaul.

These original designs may seem familiar: the eyecatches (and final shot that concludes the ending theme) to the 1990 television special showcase some of the original Katsuyoshi Nakatsuru character designs in the background behind their “updated” versions.

For even more information, check out our article on the history of Bardock which includes the full background on his creation for the television special, usage in the manga, and continued exploitation in video games.

Published by VegettoEX
22 February 2018, 10:15 AM ESTComment

In response to consistent issues with certain aspects of the online gameplay in Dragon Ball FighterZ, Bandai Namco and the game’s producer, Tomoko Hiroki, have outlined a roadmap for patches coming to the game throughout February and March:

Hello, all! I’m Tomoko Hiroki, the producer of DRAGON BALL FighterZ. First of all, I would like to thank all of you for your continuous support before and after the launch of the game. We’ve heard all your feedbacks since the release, and we’re fully aware of the online issues that you’re having such as the matching in “Ring Match” or being disconnected from the lobby. We’re aware of the situation, and keep to resolve them with all our might. In order to resolve these issues, we’re planning to release a patch on late February. However, please bear in mind that this first patch might not fix everything at once. Therefore, we’re also planning to release another patch on mid and late March to gradually reduce the issue. Rest assured that we will not stop until the fix has been completed. Meanwhile, DRAGON BALL FighterZ still has a lot more to offer so we hope you will look forward to future announcements. We thank you again for your huge support on DRAGON BALL FighterZ!

The 3-on-3, “2.5D” fighting game is developed by Arc System Works for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC (via Steam). The game runs at a 1080p resolution and 60fps frame rate, with higher resolutions available on the PlayStation 4 Pro and Xbox One X consoles, as well as the PC. Playable characters include Son Goku, Son Gohan (Cell arc design), Vegeta, Freeza, Cell, Boo (Good), Trunks, Piccolo, Kuririn, #16, #18 (with #17), Yamcha, Tenshinhan (with Chiaotzu), Ginyu (with teammates), Nappa (with Saibaimen), Gotenks, Son Gohan (Boo arc design), Boo (Pure), Hit, Beerus, and Goku Black (with Zamasu), as well as “Super Saiyan God Super Saiyan” (SSGSS, or “Super Saiyan Blue”) versions of Goku and Vegeta that can be accessed early via pre-orders or unlocked through gameplay. The Akira Toriyama-designed “#21” has also been revealed as a new character central to the game’s story mode.

Dragon Ball FighterZ was released 26 January 2018 in North America and Europe, and 01 February 2018 in Japan.

Alongside its Japanese release, Bandai Namco announced that they had shipped two million copies of the game, making it the fastest-shipping game in the franchise’s history.

Arc previously worked on Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butōden for the Nintendo 3DS (which Hiroki also served as producer on), as well as the Super Sonic Warriors games (Bukū Tōgeki and Bukū Ressen) on the Nintendo Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS. The developer is otherwise known for their Guilty Gear and BlazBlue series of fighting games.

Published by VegettoEX
21 February 2018, 9:31 PM ESTComment

The official Dragon Ball website’s twenty-eighth entry in “The Nearly Complete Works of Akira Toriyama” — an on-going series highlighting rare and important pieces of the author’s work over the years — is Toriyama’s contribution to the cover of the 1999 No. 37-38 double issue of Weekly Shōnen Jump (originally released 10 August 1999), selected for today to coincide with “Cat Day”:

The issue featured Toriyama’s second chapter in the Neko Majin series, Neko Majin Ga Iru 2 (“Neko Majin is Here 2”).

Toriyama’s corresponding author comment this issue lamented his increasing age:

このごろ近くの物が見えなくなってきた。ガーン!やっぱり44才って激しくオヤジだ <明>

These days, I’m starting to have trouble seeing things that are close to me. Augh! At 44, I’m seriously getting to be an old man. <Akira>

A few years after completing Dragon Ball, and sporadically over the next few years in between his other projects, Akira Toriyama released chapters of Neko Majin, a series that increasingly became a Dragon Ball parody and spin-off as it went on.

Chapters were published between Weekly Shōnen Jump and (the now-defunct) Monthly Shōnen Jump, sometimes entire years apart from each other. The series consists of two chapters of Neko Majin ga Iru (“Neko Majin is Here”), one chapter of Neko Majin Mike, and five chapters of Neko Majin Z. The final two chapters of Neko Majin Z bucked the trend and were published back-to-back in consecutive issues of Monthly Shōnen Jump.

All eight chapters were collected into a single volume in April 2005. The volume was printed at the same size and quality level as the Kanzenban release of the Dragon Ball manga. They were later released in a newly-colorized version on 04 April 2013 (with no monochrome version available) for ¥450 plus tax via Shueisha and their digital offerings.

So far, the only chapter ever to be officially published and released in English has been Neko Majin Z 5, which was printed (without a chapter number) in the October 2007 issue of Viz’s (now-defunct) print version of Shonen Jump.

Published by VegettoEX
21 February 2018, 10:44 AM ESTComment

Continuing onward from previous chapters, Viz has added their English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s thirty-third chapter to their website, moving further into the “Universe Survival arc” of the series. This continues Viz’s initiative of simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut, which saw its release today in the April 2018 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine in Japan.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015 as a promotional tie-in for the television series. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ thirty-third chapter available today in the magazine’s April 2018 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc to act as further promotion for the television series. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition early last year. The third collected volume is due out in English from Viz in July 2018, while the fifth collected volume is due out from Shueisha in Japan next month.

The Dragon Ball Super television series airs Sunday mornings at 9:00 a.m. on Fuji TV in Japan and is set to conclude with the series’ 131st episode next month. The series receives weekly simulcast streams on services such as Crunchyroll. FUNimation has also announced their American streaming and distribution license for the series, with the English dub beginning earlier this year on Cartoon Network, while the home video release also kicked off last year.

Published by VegettoEX
21 February 2018, 10:15 AM ESTComment

In conjunction with today’s April 2018 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine in Japan, Bandai Namco have formally unveiled Bardock and Broli as the first two playable characters to be released as paid downloadable content for Dragon Ball FighterZ.

The optional $34.99 “FighterZ Pass” covers eight additional playable characters over the game’s base roster; Bardock and Broli are the first of these eight. No release date for these characters has been listed, though one is expected to be revealed by next month.

The 3-on-3, “2.5D” fighting game is developed by Arc System Works for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC (via Steam). The game runs at a 1080p resolution and 60fps frame rate, with higher resolutions available on the PlayStation 4 Pro and Xbox One X consoles, as well as the PC. Playable characters include Son Goku, Son Gohan (Cell arc design), Vegeta, Freeza, Cell, Boo (Good), Trunks, Piccolo, Kuririn, #16, #18 (with #17), Yamcha, Tenshinhan (with Chiaotzu), Ginyu (with teammates), Nappa (with Saibaimen), Gotenks, Son Gohan (Boo arc design), Boo (Pure), Hit, Beerus, and Goku Black (with Zamasu), as well as “Super Saiyan God Super Saiyan” (SSGSS, or “Super Saiyan Blue”) versions of Goku and Vegeta that can be accessed early via pre-orders or unlocked through gameplay. The Akira Toriyama-designed “#21” has also been revealed as a new character central to the game’s story mode.

Dragon Ball FighterZ was released 26 January 2018 in North America and Europe, and 01 February 2018 in Japan.

Alongside its Japanese release, Bandai Namco announced that they had shipped two million copies of the game, making it the fastest-shipping game in the franchise’s history.

Arc previously worked on Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butōden for the Nintendo 3DS, as well as the Super Sonic Warriors games (Bukū Tōgeki and Bukū Ressen) on the Nintendo Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS. The developer is otherwise known for their Guilty Gear and BlazBlue series of fighting games.

Published by VegettoEX
21 February 2018, 9:44 AM ESTComment

Each month, Toyotarō provides a sketch — as well as a brief comment — on the official Japanese Dragon Ball website for a character that has not yet appeared in Dragon Ball Super. Thus far, Toyotaro has provided sketches of #8 and Lunch. For his February entry, Toyotarō has contributed a sketch of King Chapa (alongside Oob, who has been referenced in the television series, and explicitly shown in the manga):

CHAPA: You are certainly gifted. How about entering the next Tenka’ichi Budōkai?
OOB: Huh?! Me?

TOYOTARO: It’s King Chapa (what I think he looks like now)! Maybe King Chapa was the one who trained Oob until he turned 10! Their clothes look similar, so I kind of figured they came from the same region.

This sketch and comment set has been added to the respective page in our “Translations” archive.

Published by VegettoEX
21 February 2018, 9:27 AM ESTComment

In its third week on sale (the reporting period of 12 February 2018 to 18 February 2018), Dragon Ball FighterZ pushed another 5,975 copies on the PlayStation 4 to hit the #17 spot on the Media Create Sales list, bringing it to 88,943 total copies sold.

By its third week in November 2016, Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2 pushed 87,105 total copies. The first Dragon Ball XENOVERSE pushed 72,838 and 54,442 total copies on the PlayStation 3 and 4, respectively, by its third week in February 2015.

The 3-on-3, “2.5D” fighting game is developed by Arc System Works for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC (via Steam). The game runs at a 1080p resolution and 60fps frame rate, with higher resolutions available on the PlayStation 4 Pro and Xbox One X consoles, as well as the PC. Playable characters include Son Goku, Son Gohan (Cell arc design), Vegeta, Freeza, Cell, Boo (Good), Trunks, Piccolo, Kuririn, #16, #18 (with #17), Yamcha, Tenshinhan (with Chiaotzu), Ginyu (with teammates), Nappa (with Saibaimen), Gotenks, Son Gohan (Boo arc design), Boo (Pure), Hit, Beerus, and Goku Black (with Zamasu), as well as “Super Saiyan God Super Saiyan” (SSGSS, or “Super Saiyan Blue”) versions of Goku and Vegeta that can be accessed early via pre-orders or unlocked through gameplay. The Akira Toriyama-designed “#21” has also been revealed as a new character central to the game’s story mode. Upcoming paid DLC characters are set to include Broly and Bardock, along with at least six other characters.

Dragon Ball FighterZ was released 26 January 2018 in North America and Europe, and 01 February 2018 in Japan.

Alongside its Japanese release, Bandai Namco announced that they had shipped two million copies of the game, making it the fastest-shipping game in the franchise’s history.

Arc previously worked on Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butōden for the Nintendo 3DS, as well as the Super Sonic Warriors games (Bukū Tōgeki and Bukū Ressen) on the Nintendo Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS. The developer is otherwise known for their Guilty Gear and BlazBlue series of fighting games.

Published by VegettoEX
21 February 2018, 8:57 AM ESTComment

Shueisha has unveiled the cover art for the forthcoming fifth collected volume of Toyotarō’s Dragon Ball Super manga, due out both in print and digitally in Japan 02 March 2018:

The artwork is sourced from a composition originally created for a bonus poster included with the January 2017 issue of Saikyō Jump (released 02 December 2017):

Additionally, select stores in Japan will offer alternate covers for the manga; a list of stores will be made available alongside the book’s release date next month.

The fifth collected volume of the Dragon Ball Super manga will pick up with chapter 25 and will retail for ¥400 + tax.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015 as a promotional tie-in for the television series. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ thirty-third chapter available today in the magazine’s April 2018 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc to act as further promotion for the television series. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition early last year. The third collected volume is due out in English from Viz in July 2018, while the fourth collected volume was released by Shueisha in Japan back in November.

The Dragon Ball Super television series airs Sunday mornings at 9:00 a.m. on Fuji TV in Japan and is set to conclude with the series’ 131st episode next month. The series receives weekly simulcast streams on services such as Crunchyroll. FUNimation has also announced their American streaming and distribution license for the series, with the English dub beginning earlier this year on Cartoon Network, while the home video release also kicked off last year.

Published by VegettoEX
20 February 2018, 10:21 PM ESTComment

The official Dragon Ball website’s twenty-seventh entry in “The Nearly Complete Works of Akira Toriyama” — an on-going series highlighting rare and important pieces of the author’s work over the years — is the Son Goku sketch that accompanied his thank you message in the seventh Daizenshuu in February 1996:

Toriyama’s message begins in the traditional fashion but essentially ends up as an apology for never being able to write back to all of his fan letters:

So many, many people have helped me out with Dragon Ball through the years. Obviously, there are the fans from all over the world who’ve cheered me on. And I’m particularly indebted to my three editors (Torishima-san, Kondo-san, and Takeda-san). Then there’s everyone involved with Shueisha, the comics, the special collections, the animation, TV, movies, toys, games, merchandise, events, etc. And then there’s my wife, family, and friends, all of whom I am tremendously indebted to. Goku and the rest of the characters all did their best, as well. I truly am a happy man.

Thank you all so very much!!

Come to think of it, even though I’ve received tons of fan letters and presents from everyone, I’ve never written anyone back. How rude of me! Let me take this opportunity to apologize: I’m sorry.

Well anyway, farewell.

–Akira Toriyama, December 1995

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