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The 2013 film Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods finally sees its home release today from FUNimation and comes packed with the original theatrical version along with a special extended edition. Stay tuned here at Kanzenshuu for a more complete review in the near future, but in the meantime, check out these quick facts: it is everything you actually wanted to know about this home release!

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What is “Battle of Gods”?
Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods was the first new theatrical film for the franchise in seventeen years, hitting Japanese theaters 30 March 2013. Though its original concepts were created by Toei Animation, original manga author Akira Toriyama entered the production early on to oversee much of the story and dialog. The script is attributed to Yūsuke Watanabe. A musical score was provided by Norihito Sumitomo. Character designs and animation supervision were handled by Tadayoshi Yamamuro. The film was directed by Masahiro Hosoda. The story is written to take place between the defeat of Majin Buu and the 28th Tenka’ichi Budōkai and is officially set in Age 778.

What is in the extended edition?
The extended edition includes just over twenty minutes of additional material, ranging from three-second interstitial transitions to entirely new scenes. Virtually nothing is removed or replaced; it is all additive.

Is this release in English or Japanese?
As with pretty much all of FUNimation’s home releases since 2000, this release includes the original Japanese audio track (with accompanying English subtitle translations) along with the company’s own English dub.

Which region is encoded onto the Blu-ray?
The disc is solely encoded for Region A. Manga UK will be releasing their own version of this release in November.

Who provided the translation for the subtitles?
Long-time Dragon Ball fan and FUNimation translator for the franchise Steven J. “Daimao” Simmons provided the translation.

What name spelling is used for the main antagonist in the subtitles?
Simmons went with a spelling of “Beers” in the subtitle track. For more information on the question, read our own overview. The character’s attendant is adapted with the traditional “Whis” spelling.

Are all of the audio tracks provided in 5.1 surround sound?
The English dub for the theatrical version, the original Japanese track for the theatrical version, and the English dub for the extended edition are all produced in 5.1 surround sound. The odd man out is the Japanese track for the extended edition, which is presented in standard stereo sound.

What kinds of special features are included?
Two featurettes are included along with other, shorter videos adding up to roughly half an hour of bonus material:

  • “Behind the Scenes: Battle of Voice Actors” (9:55) – An extended scene of Goku fighting Beerus with overlaid boxes of the English voice actors performing the lines.
  • “The Voices of Dragon Ball Z: Unveiled” (19:23) – Short introductions to various English voice actors, showcases of them performing their lines, and more.
  • Textless Closing Song (3:31) – A creditless version of the movie’s closing theme song.
  • U.S. Trailer (1:48) – FUNimation’s English-language trailer for the film using footage from the extended edition.
  • Trailers – Promotional videos and trailers for various FUNimation-licensed shows.

Is such-and-such reference kept in the English dub?
For the most part, yes. This includes an off-hand reference to a particular character’s sibling as well as the length of certain types of entertainment. The English dub’s script receives a bit of “punching-up” as seen in the company’s original 2000-onward dubbing, but overall lies somewhere between that and their Dragon Ball Kai treatment.

Are the original Japanese or English versions of FLOW’s songs included?
The English dub tracks and original Japanese language tracks for both versions of the film feature FLOW’s English versions of “Hero: Song of Hope” and “CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA”. This has been the case with most other international releases (even in the Japanese language tracks). An opening screen of text on the release acknowledges and notes this change.

Are the end credits only provided in English?
Yes, the credits are exclusively written in English accompanied by the English version of FLOW’s “CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA”. The Japanese cast is attributed to character names as they appear in the subtitles (Kuririn, Tenshinhan, Kaioshin, etc.). The kanzenban pages are not edited from their original Japanese text.

What types of releases are available?
A two-disc DVD set as well as a three-disc DVD & Blu-ray combo set are available. Each contain both the original theatrical and extended versions of the film.

Where can I purchase this home release?
Most retailers carry the movie. It is also available online from retailers such as Amazon and RightStuf.

I want to know more about this movie!
Head on over to the respective page in our “Movie Guide” for anything and everything you ever wanted to know about Battle of Gods! We have interview translations, character designs, links to our podcast reviews, and much more.

Is there a new movie coming in 2015?
Yes! Check out our article to learn everything there is to know so far.


The official website for Super Dragon Ball Z — the arcade (2005) and PlayStation 2 (2006) fighting game from Crafts & Meister — was a wealth of amazing information and content in its day. In addition to an original sketch and comment from Akira Toriyama himself, the website later updated with comments from three lead members of the game’s production staff: Ryūichirō Baba (Banpresto Producer), Noritaka Funamizu (Crafts & Meister Executive Director), and Akira Nishitani (ARIKA Director).

Check out a complete translation of their comments over in — appropriately enough! — our “Translations” section. More from Funamizu is on its way soon, so stay tuned!


Something that has been passed around as accepted fact over the years is that Akira Toriyama went on to design a special upgraded version of Mecha Freeza for the PlayStation 2 home release of Super Dragon Ball Z. We here at Kanzenshuu even incorporated this into our accepted knowledge base without really questioning it.

It turns out this may not actually be true.

Check out the “Video Games” page of our “Rumor Guide” for the full scoop on this and many other questionable tidbits of knowledge!


Super Dragon Ball Z is a game that needs no introduction around these parts. Created by Crafts & Meister-fronted Noritaka Funamizu (co-designer of various Street Fighter games), the game came at a time when Dimps was wrapping up the Dragon Ball Z / Budokai series while Spike was jumping into the ring with their Sparking! / Budokai Tenkaichi series, offering traditional fighting game enthusiasts something more akin to what they had grown up with.

After an announcement in late 2005, the game officially hit Japanese arcades 22 December 2005 (and was ported to the PlayStation 2 the following year). Alongside the launch, the game’s official website published a sketch and message from original manga author Akira Toriyama:

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Everyone on the staff, who is more knowledgeable about Dragon Ball than a guy like me, and who love it very much, obsessed over [reproducing] the atmosphere of the original comic, and have finished up a truly enjoyable game!

Everyone, by all means please give it a play, losing yourself in the battle world of this hot Super Dragon Ball Z!

— Akira Toriyama

Stay tuned for even more content from the Super Dragon Ball Z archives in the coming days! In addition to some podcast coverage, we have translated comments from three members of the game’s production staff, along with an absolutely massive “Rumor Guide” entry / research project. As they say, please look forward to it!


Earlier this month, on Episode #0365 of our podcast, we discussed a variety of sources that provided more information about what happens to certain characters in the Dragon World. Some of these are common questions fans tend to ask while reading the series (“What happens to the rabbit gang when the moon is destroyed?”) while others are new tidbits of information outlining additional jobs and adventures the characters find themselves taking on.

As with many of our podcast episodes, it was a way for us to collect and outline the information ahead of time to later use in a proper section on the website!

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The “Character Fates” page has officially been added to our “Tidbits” section. The characters we currently have detailed include:

  • The Rabbit Gang
  • Tsuru-Sen’nin & Tao Pai-pai
  • Lunch
  • Yamcha
  • Tenshinhan
  • Chiaotzu
  • #17
  • Son Goku

Read on to learn what happens to these characters! Depending on what news comes our way leading up to the new movie in 2015 (as was the case leading up to Battle of Gods last year), we may even have more entries to add in the coming months!


It is time to once again to dust off a few issues of V-Jump, pull out a few randomly-purchased magazines, and attempt to put another minor dent in our ever-growing translation backlog! This time around we are hitting a few lengthier interviews, intermixed with some short Q&As and commentaries, with original manga author Akira Toriyama as well as a few others associated with the Dragon Ball franchise.

  • V-Jump, May 2013 Issue – “Double Dragon Talk” Interview
    This interview with Naho Ooishi (author of Dragon Ball SD) and Toyotarō (author of Dragon Ball Heroes: Victory Mission) was released on 21 March 2013, just shortly before Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods officially debuted on 30 March 2013. The two manga artists gave their review of the film, having just seen an early screening, and each includes a short humorous comic strip about it.
  • V-Jump, June 2014 Issue – Kōzō Shioya & Unshō Ishizuka Interview
    With the “Majin Buu arc” of Dragon Ball Kai just underway in Japan, this issue of V-Jump contains an interview with some of the other stars of the series, Kōzō Shioya (Majin Buu) and Unshō Ishizuka (Mister Satan). The two discuss their respective characters, the change in their performances from Dragon Ball Z, and of course the recording session after-parties.
  • Men’s Non-No (January 2014) – Akira Toriyama Interview
    In late-2013 Men’s Non-No, a fashion and lifestyle magazine for the young single male business professional, interviewed Akira Toriyama just shortly after Jaco the Galactic Patrolman wrapped up its run in Weekly Shōnen Jump. The author discusses his early career, how he stumbled into the manga business, his most popular series (Dr. Slump and Dragon Ball), as well as some of his more recent works.
  • Training the Manga Mind – Akira Toriyama Q&A
    Published by Shueisha on 19 March 2010, Training the Manga Mind was a special book released as a part of the Weekly Shōnen Jump 40th anniversary celebration (the anniversary itself was in 2008). It features interviews with, and articles about, 37 different Jump manga artists and their techniques, conducted/written by Shima Kadokura. Naturally, Toriyama is quite shy about this, and while most other artists have face-to-face interviews where they show Kadokura their studio and tools in person, Toriyama’s is a Q&A conducted by e-mail.

While not from a print publication, Fuji TV’s own website published a brief series of comments with Dragon Ball Kai production staff earlier this year:

  • Fuji TV Information: “Dragon Ball Kai” Producer Comments
    As part of their promotional hype for the revival of Dragon Ball Kai in 2014, Fuji TV’s public relations department released statements from two of the series’ producers, Osamu Nozaki and Norihiro Hayashida. While they contain nothing too eye-opening regarding the production process, you can certainly “feel” the hype level they are striving for. It also marks the first time anyone associated with its production notes that this new production coincides with the 25th anniversary of Dragon Ball Z.

As always, you can now find these listed on our “Translations” page along with many others. Check back soon for our next batch of translations, as we attempt to clear out as much as we can in preparation for the upcoming 2015 Dragon Ball Z movie!


The “Full Color” version of the Dragon Ball manga reached the end of its storyline earlier this month with the print-version release of the fourth, fifth, and six volumes in the Majin Buu arc.

The third volume from last month started up a new Q&A session (following up on previous ones, such as the great tidbits from the Cell arc volumes), but did not contain much in the way of exciting new information. This month’s releases are a doozy, however! All three sessions have been fully translated and have been archived over in our (appropriately enough!) “Translations” section.

Click through to read each in their entirety, or see below for a sampling of the most revealing new tidbits, such as more about Bibidi and Babidi’s dark magic along with a name for Mr. Satan’s late wife…!

The Act of Fusion

It’s hard, but they can!
I think it’s possible to merge no matter the conditions, as long as it all goes well. I even think it’s possible for a larger number of people. However, since it’s quite hard for both parties to strike that delicate balance, it’s very difficult for two extremely different people to fuse. In that sense, synchronized swimmers would probably be really good at Fusion. By the way, there are many different types of Fusion, and the kind Goku learned is the one for increasing battle power.

The Birth of Babidi

Bibidi split in two!
Rather than a child, he’s more like Bibidi’s doppelganger. He’d split up whenever there was anything difficult for just a single person to do. He could increase the number of doppelgangers even more, but his magical powers would weaken in proportion. Now that Bibidi is dead and Babidi has become the only one, he’s regained all the original magical power.

Mr. Satan’s Wife

Satan’s wife was a beautiful singer named Miguel!
Since she was named “Miguel (archangel)”, during their marriage a big fuss was made about how “an angel is marrying a devil!”


Earlier this year we updated with a great batch of new Dragon Ball song lyric translations. Included at the time were lyrics to the short versions the “Galaxy Mission” and “Evil Dragon Mission” theme songs from the Dragon Ball Heroes arcade game updates. This month’s “Limited Edition” release of the “Kuu-Zen-Zetsu-Go” CD single came packed with a DVD containing the full-length versions of the songs, so these two lyric pages have been updated!

Alongside these updates are the following all-new entries, all of which have been added to our “Lyrics” section with their original Japanese, romanizations, and English-translated lyrics:

Kuu-Zen-Zetsu-Go: Like Nothing Before or After
Takayoshi Tanimoto and “Dragon Soul” contributed the new opening theme to the Japanese television broadcast of the Majin Buu arc of Dragon Ball Kai. The CD single for the song was released 24 May 2014.

Dear Zarathustra
The Japanese band “Good Morning America” contributed the third closing theme to Dragon Ball Kai, used as the ending theme for the Majin Buu arc’s Japanese television broadcast from episodes 99-111. The CD single for the song was released 06 May 2014.

Pure Heart
Japanese singer-songwriter Leo Ieiri contributed the fourth closing theme to Dragon Ball Kai, currently being used as the ending theme for the Majin Buu arc’s Japanese television broadcast from episodes 112-onward. The CD single for the song will be released 30 July 2014.

HERO ~Song of Hope~ (FLOW Official English Version)
In all international editions of the 2013 film Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods, the insert song was replaced with an official English version performed by FLOW, its original Japanese band.

CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA (FLOW Official English Version)
Similar to the insert song, the ending theme in all international editions of the 2013 film Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods was replaced with an official English version performed by FLOW, its original Japanese band.

Enjoy singing along to some of your new favorite Dragon Ball-related tunes!


While the staff here at Kanzenshuu unfortunately could not personally make it out to California for the event, we have a great group of friends that were able to help coordinate a whole bunch of excellent coverage from the North American debut for the film Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods.

Before the evening’s festivities kicked off, we did have a chance in-house to talk with FUNimation voice actors and directors Sean Schemmel, Christopher Sabat, and Justin Cook about the movie itself, its themes, some of the casting choices, and much more. Give the interview a listen via Episode #0364 of our podcast, released earlier this evening.

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Our buddies Josh and Ryan served as our correspondents at FUNimation’s “red carpet” event leading up to the debut of the film’s English dub last night. Check out their great recap video showcasing some of the arrivals, another quick interview segment with Christopher Sabat, and some of the fans cosplaying it up in anticipation of the film.

While the film has made its way to theaters and even home video releases across much of the rest of the globe already, this formally kicks off its North American release. Look for a limited theatrical run from 05 August 2014 to 09 August 2014. More and more theaters and showtimes are being added constantly, so be sure to check back and stay tuned to your local theaters!


Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods, the first new film for the franchise in seventeen years, debuted in Japanese theaters 30 March 2013 with a home DVD and Blu-ray release 13 September 2013. There was a good deal of material left on the cutting room floor back in the planning stages, but some of the material seemed to make its way rather far into production: an extended version of the film was revealed for a special TV broadcast 22 March 2014 during the “Premium Saturday” block. The extra material and extended scenes added up to about twenty minutes of additional footage in the TV edition, resulting in a final runtime of just over 100 minutes.

With the hints — via (now deleted) tweets and specific character castings — that FUNimation may have acquired this extended version, interest is piling up all over again. It seems like the best time to debut our full documentation on this special extended version!

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On a new sub-page of the respective “Movie Guide” page, you will find a complete breakdown of all added, extended, and altered scenes.

Don’t forget that the movie’s main page in the “Movie Guide” details a wealth of information such as its promotion materials, the original design and concept drafts for the film, and a complete set of translated credits.