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Published by VegettoEX
14 April 2016, 2:18 PM EDTComment

Following up on and complementing our earlier FOCUS magazine article translation, we are adding one more pre-Dragon Ball translation to the pile: Akira Toriyama’s first major television interview. Toriyama was a guest on Tetsuko Kuroyanagi’s afternoon talk show, Tetsuko’s Room, first aired in Japan 04 May 1983. The interview itself must have been conducted some time that April, since Toriyama mentions being married “almost a year” (his wedding haven taken place on 02 May 1982), because only the first nine volumes of Dr. Slump were out at the time, and because Toriyama had been in serialization for “three years and four months”. Kuroyanagi’s demeanor is cordial throughout and her speech is always honorific-polite, though she is clearly struggling to elicit some kind of answer from Toriyama at points. Toriyama, meanwhile, seems clearly out of his element, and does not always know what to say, preferring to keep his answers short and frequently looking over at his wife for support.

tetsuko_375w

In the interview, Toriyama remarks on the pressure of media attention following his rapid success, the merchandising empire already set in place surrounding Dr. Slump, and relying on his wife for motivation and assistance:

Toriyama: Sometimes she helps me with my work, though.

Tetsuko: Ah, is that so? Then she must be quite good, then.

Toriyama: She’s a lifesaver in that respect.

Tetsuko: Say, she must know about a variety of other things, as well, with you. What’s rough, and what’s difficult.

Toriyama: That’s really the part where she’s helped me the most. If it were someone who didn’t know that, well…. For instance, when I’m coming up with a story, and such, she starts talking to me without any reservation. That point — since she drew herself, as well — it seems she knows what parts are hard for me.

Tetsuko: In that case, you married the right person.

Toriyama: Yes, I did. (laughs)

READ THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSLATION

This interview has been archived in our “Translations” section.

As with our prior pre-Dragon Ball translations, our goal is not necessarily to catalog them all, but rather to (at the very least) pinpoint the milestones along the way that led up to Dragon Ball. Much like reading Dr. Slump provides a whole new outlook on Dragon Ball, Toriyama’s earliest interviews perfectly complement his later ones and shine a light on the “how” and “why” behind many of his decisions.

Published by VegettoEX
13 April 2016, 2:43 PM EDTComment

Following up on Toriyama’s first two print interviews from 1980, today we are adding one more pre-Dragon Ball translation to the pile: an article from FOCUS magazine’s 1982 #19 issue. In the article, Shinchosha’s photo-essay magazine focused on Akira Toriyama’s wedding and his drastic increase in annual income.

focus_cover

The article goes on to discuss Toriyama’s courtship with his newly-wed wife as well as his income, which in the article’s own terms, solidified him as a “bona fide rich man.” As was common for the time, press and fans alike wondered where the author was heading, and if it was possible for him to top Dr. Slump with anything of substance and staying-power:

What concerns us poor people more than anything is how he will spend that 539,240,000 yen. However, about 430 million of this great sum is taken out in taxes. Even as a bona fide rich man, he thought of these taxes as “harsh”. So, what’s left is a little over 100 million yen. This was used to buy a 260-tsubo plot near his home and build a house on it, so now it’s all gone. For the time being, he’ll be able to continue living off the “Arale-chan boom”, but he won’t be able to rely on Arale-chan forever. “My comic won’t change after I’m married”, he says, but what sort of characters will this “rich man”, who in two years has acquired a mansion and taken a bride, come out with from within the walls of his estate?

READ THE FULL ARTICLE TRANSLATION

This article has been archived in our “Translations” section.

As with our prior pre-Dragon Ball translations, our goal is not necessarily to catalog them all, but rather to (at the very least) pinpoint the milestones along the way that led up to Dragon Ball.

Published by VegettoEX
13 April 2016, 8:45 AM EDTComment

Czecho No Republic has released the full track listings and cover art for both the “Czecho Version” and “Dragon Ball Super Version” of their upcoming “Forever Dreaming” CD single, the title track for which is currently in use as the fourth closing theme to the Dragon Ball Super TV series.

The “Czecho Version” will include the original Japanese as well as an English version of “Forever Dreaming” and two additional tracks: “24 Factory” and “Dinosaur (Daydream Version)”:

h1_4_ol

“CZECHO VERSION”:

  1. Forever Dreaming
  2. 24 Factory
  3. Forever Dreaming (English Version)
  4. Dinosaur (Daydream Version)

The “Dragon Ball Super Version” will include both the Japanese and English versions of “Forever Dreaming” along with two additional tracks: “24 Factory” and a cover of the closing theme to the original Dragon Ball TV series, “I’ll Give You Romance“:

h1_4_a_ol

“DRAGON BALL SUPER VERSION”:

  1. Forever Dreaming
  2. 24 Factory
  3. Forever Dreaming (English Version)
  4. I’ll Give You Romance

“Forever Dreaming”, available now various Japanese digital storefronts as a TV-sized single, saw its full-length radio debut today in Japan on Tokyo FM’s “Skyrocket Company” broadcast.

The “Czecho Version” (COZX-1174~5; ¥1700 + tax) and “Dragon Ball Super Version” (COCA-17191; ¥1200 + tax) of the “Forever Dreaming” CD singles will be available 18 May 2016 in Japan. Both are available for pre-order on CDJapan and Amazon Japan.

Czecho No Republic previously contributed “Oh Yeah!!!!!!!” as the fifth overall closing theme for the Japanese broadcast of Dragon Ball Kai.

“I’ll Give You Romance” was also recently covered by Kazuya Yoshii on his CD single for the Dragon Ball Super opening theme, “Chōzetsu ☆ Dynamic!”

Published by VegettoEX
11 April 2016, 7:49 PM EDTComment

Dragon Ball received several highly-interesting guide books during its original serialization. These special issues of Jump — “mooks” (a combination of “magazine” and “book”) — would be released in promotion of the latest story arcs. A recent example might be 2015’s Dragon Ball Super: Super Start Guide, a book actually released prior to its respective television debut which shares early story beats and interviews with directorial and creative staff members.

1989 saw the release of the Jump Gold Selection: Dragon Ball Z Anime Special “mook” followed by a second volume in 1991. These mid-serialization “mooks” served as the first cataloged point of several tidbits of information which would later be cited in the Daizenshuu.

z_anime_special_2_cover

This second book includes a roundtable interview/discussion entitled “Super Anime-jin” (or just “Super Anime People”) with seven key players:

  • Kenji Shimizu: Fuji TV Producer
  • Daisuke Nishio: Series Director
  • Takao Koyama: Series Organizer
  • Kōzō Morishita: Toei Animation Producer
  • Masako Nozawa: Voice of Son Goku & Son Gohan
  • Akira Toriyama: Original Creator
  • Minoru Maeda: Chief Animator

The “mook” itself was released 06 June 1991 (as cited by Toriyama himself in the weekly comments for Chapter 327 of the manga). The roundtable discussion — which appears to have taken place at a Chinese restaurant and at an actual round table — must have taken place some time between April and early-June 1991 due to comments made about the impending theatrical release of Dragon Ball Z Movie 5. This places many of the comments in a fascinating historical context, such as scenario writer Takao Koyama noting:

By the way, since Kaiō is the Kaiō of the North Galaxy… That means there must be a South, East, and West Galaxy, as well…

In the discussion, Akira Toriyama remarks that the Bardock TV special made him cry, a comment he would later echo in his 1995 Daizenshuu #6 interview, and consistently-so yet again in 2011 with his special comments for the Bardock and Trunks “Special Selection DVD” home release.

Koyama:
Well, at first, we were talking about whether we could do that for a theatrical movie.

Morishita:
Whether we could do something in the form of Goku vs. Goku’s father.

Koyama:
However, without resorting to time travel or some-such, he wouldn’t be able to fight against Goku… And before long, the conversation shifted to, “In that case, perhaps it would be all right to have a story depicting Goku’s father.”

Toriyama:
That special was good. I cried. How come you can make a story so much better than the original manga? (laughs)

Koyama:
But after that, you made use of the setting from that time in the original manga, and I was truly grateful.

Toriyama:
Well, that’s because I wanted to use it, no matter what…

The staff also detail the somewhat-hidden name pun source behind “Coola”:

Koyama:
It’s called The Incredible Strongest vs. Strongest, and would you believe it, Freeza’s brother, named Coola, appears…

Morishita:
The origin of the name is interesting…

Koyama:
Yes, that’s right. I was talking about how I’d eaten something called “ice-cream manjū” back when I was in Kiryū, and Morishita-san said he remembered that sort of thing, too. Since Morishita-san is from Shizuoka, I asked him if they say “kuu zura”4 or something in Shizuoka, and he said, “No, we say ‘kuu ra’.” (laughs)

Morishita:
There’s no “zu”. (laughs)

Koyama:
So, Coola! And, we ended up saying, “Let’s just go with that, then”.

READ THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSLATION

This interview has been archived in our “Translations” section.

Published by VegettoEX
08 April 2016, 11:52 AM EDTComment

Back in April 2014, in celebration of the Jaco the Galactic Patrolman collected manga volume release, Shueisha began including new comments from Akira Toriyama on the obi (paper band surrounding the book, generally promotional in nature) of his seven other (non-Dr. Slump and non-Dragon Ball) manga volumes. While each comment was only a short few lines, they provide a quick insight into the mind of the man himself, with the occasional nod or comparison to Dragon Ball. Toriyama also contributed a new illustration for each comment which showcases a representative character crossing their arms. These comments were also briefly archived on Shueisha’s promotional Jaco the Galactic Patrolman website.

For Neko Majin in particular — a series that he sporadically worked on over the course of 1999 to 2005 — Toriyama commented on the absurdity of the series and how he enjoyed putting together the early chapters:

Bursting with stupidity!
I love light stuff like this.
The early part of Neko Majin in particular, I enjoyed drawing.
For me, that’s rare.
—Akira Toriyama

READ THE FULL COMMENTS

These comments have been archived in our “Translations” section.

Published by VegettoEX
07 April 2016, 11:43 AM EDTComment

While Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butoden has received four major patches in Japan adding a wealth of game modes and Z-Assist characters (with a fifth update promised on top of all that), the international release has been stuck in its launch state since October.

That has changed with “The Extreme Patch”, available now in Europe.

The update, available now on the Nintendo 3DS eShop, brings the international release up to Version 1.1.0 and adds a new training mode, survival mode, online multiplayer battles, and a wealth of new Z-Assist characters from the previous Japanese patches. New — seemingly exclusive — Z-Assist additions to the international release include Master Sergeant Murasaki and a Goku/Gohan combination (from the end of the Cell arc).

UPDATE: The 1.1.0 update is now available in the American Nintendo 3DS eShop as well.

extreme_butoden_us_110_patch

Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butōden launched in Japan 11 June 2015. First-press copies of the game come packed with bonus content, including a downloadable version of the Super Famicom game Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden 2 (previously included as a part of the J-Legend Retsuden compilation game; albeit now with replacement music). Arc System Works developed the game for Bandai Namco. The developer previously worked on the Bukū… / Supersonic Warriors games on the Nintendo GameBoy Advance and DS.

The game was released in Europe 16 October 2015, in North and Latin America 20 October 2015, and in Brazil 23 October 2015. A free demo is also available on the Nintendo 3DS eShop.

Published by VegettoEX
06 April 2016, 10:02 AM EDTComment

The first collected volume of Toyotarō’s Dragon Ball Super manga — originally and currently serialized on a monthly basis in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine — officially hit Japanese shelves 04 April 2016 for ¥400 + tax. Spanning 192 pages, the volume covers the first nine chapters, the Jump Victory Carnival 2015 bonus comic, and also includes an interview between Toyotarō and original manga author Akira Toriyama.

While the Revival of “F” (Resurrection ‘F’) arc indeed remains skipped in this compilation, a humorous in-betweener from Sorbet acknowledges this “in-universe” to a degree.

dbs_manga_vol1_shueisha

In the interview, the duo discuss returning to a tournament for the latest story in Dragon Ball Super, the appeal of Toriyama’s artwork, and what aspects Toyotarō could improve upon:

Toyotarō: U-Um… Really? There’s nothing you think needs to be fixed or thrown out? Don’t hold back for my sake… (sweat).

Toriyama: Hahahaha (loud laughter). Not really… (thinks about it a little bit). Nope, not a thing! Well OK… If I have to say something, then I guess your compositions would be even better if you utilized more diverse angles. Also, I think it would be great if you included more of your own original ideas. I’m really grateful to you. I never thought an artist like you would come along to draw the continuation of my story!

READ THE FULL INTERVIEW

Shueisha published an addendum to the interview — which “couldn’t fit” in the volume — on the official V-Jump website, where the duo discuss Toyotarō’s history with the series, Toriyama’s supervisory role in reviewing the manga, and where Dragon Ball Super will head in the future.

toriyama_toyotaro_interview_web_banner

In particular, Toriyama discusses the ever-changing color of Super Saiyan hair along with — continuing on from the book version’s of the interview — reiterating that a “pretty popular character” is set to make a return:

Toyotarō: I’ve read the plot for the new story, and I’m really happy a certain future-related character is going to be involved. I’m a huge fan!

Toriyama: That’s a pretty popular character! Hopefully the kids will be happy.

READ THE FULL INTERVIEW

The print edition of the manga is currently available for purchase via CDJapan. A digital release of the collected manga volume will follow on 02 May 2016. The eleventh chapter of Toyotarō’s Dragon Ball Super manga will be published within the June 2016 issue of V-Jump set for release in Japan 21 April 2016.

Published by VegettoEX
05 April 2016, 10:18 PM EDTComment

Following several prior patches, Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butōden on the Nintendo 3DS received a new patch today (06 April 2016) in Japan, bringing it up to Version 1.4.0.

extreme_butoden_140_title

The promised update adds Botamo and Frost (from Dragon Ball Super‘s Universe 6) as new Z-Assist (summoned helper) characters:

Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butōden launched in Japan 11 June 2015. First-press copies of the game come packed with bonus content, including a downloadable version of the Super Famicom game Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden 2 (previously included as a part of the J-Legend Retsuden compilation game; albeit now with replacement music). Arc System Works developed the game for Bandai Namco. The developer previously worked on the Bukū… / Supersonic Warriors games on the Nintendo GameBoy Advance and DS.

The game was released in Europe 16 October 2015, in North and Latin America 20 October 2015, and in Brazil 23 October 2015. A free demo is also available on the Nintendo 3DS eShop.

Thus far, none of the game’s patches have been released or localized outside of Japan.

Published by VegettoEX
04 April 2016, 9:45 PM EDTComment

This week’s May 2016 issue of Saikyō Jump in Japan (released 01 April 2016) has announced that Frost and Botamo of Dragon Ball Super‘s Universe 6 will join the Nintendo 3DS game Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butōden as Z-Assist characters in a forthcoming update.

zassist_frost_botamo_announce

The quick advertisement focuses on Frost, who is seen delivering a Death Beam-like attack, with a promotional splash stating, “The Evil Emperor of Universe 6 Descends!!!”

The game’s most recent patch in Japan (Version 1.3.0) added yet another four Z-Assist characters on top of the ever-growing list.

Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butōden launched in Japan 11 June 2015. First-press copies of the game come packed with bonus content, including a downloadable version of the Super Famicom game Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden 2 (previously included as a part of the J-Legend Retsuden compilation game; albeit now with replacement music). Arc System Works developed the game for Bandai Namco. The developer previously worked on the Bukū… / Supersonic Warriors games on the Nintendo GameBoy Advance and DS.

The game was released in Europe 16 October 2015, in North and Latin America 20 October 2015, and in Brazil 23 October 2015. A free demo is also available on the Nintendo 3DS eShop.

Thus far, none of the game’s patches have been released or localized outside of Japan.

Published by VegettoEX
04 April 2016, 9:38 PM EDTComment

Cross Epoch, the 2006 manga collaboration between Dragon Ball‘s Akira Toriyama and One Piece‘s Ei’ichiro Oda, originally received an English-language translation in Viz’s Shonen Jump Issue #100 back in February 2011.

The special crossover chapter is finally due for a re-release with its inclusion in Viz’s upcoming third One Piece manga box set, due 04 October 2016 in North America. The inclusion was announced by Alexis Kirsch (current One Piece editor) during Viz’s 150th Shonen Jump podcast episode this week in response to a listener question regarding bonus content in the set:

It will be the One Piece / Dragon Ball crossover plus the One Piece / Toriko crossover.

Cross Epoch was originally published in the 2007 #4/5 issue of Weekly Shōnen Jump in Japan.

Thanks to the One Piece Podcast for the heads-up!