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Published by VegettoEX
12 June 2017, 1:16 PM EDTComment

Depending on when you entered Dragon Ball fandom, you may have come across — or even personally use! — different names for Freeza’s race. Do you call them “Frost Demons”? Perhaps “Changelings”? And how does the name “Arcosian” fit into this?

Despite all the recent additions to the Dragon World through spin-off features and video games (not to mention changes in international adaptations), “Freeza’s race” still does not have a proper name.

Check out the “Characters” page of our “Rumor Guide” for the full scoop on this and many other questionable tidbits of knowledge!

Published by VegettoEX
11 June 2017, 6:25 PM EDTComment

The debut trailer for the upcoming Dragon Ball FighterZ was shown this afternoon during Microsoft’s Electronic Entertainment Expo (“E3”) 2017 press briefing.

Characters shown fighting during the trailer include Goku (Super Saiyan and Super Saiyan 3), Vegeta (Super Saiyan), Freeza (final form and Golden), Gohan (Super Saiyan 2), Cell (Perfect), and Majin Boo (Good).

The 3-on-3, “2.5D” fighting game is set for an “early 2018” release worldwide and is under development by Arc System Works for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC (via Steam). The game is advertised as running at a 1080p resolution and 60fps frame rate, with higher resolutions available on the PlayStation 4 Pro and Xbox One X consoles. According to the company’s European branch, a closed beta on the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One will be available, “before end of summer”.

Arc previously worked on Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butoden for the Nintendo 3DS, as well as the Super Sonic Warriors games (Bukū Tōgeki and Bukū Ressen) on the Nintendo Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS. The developer is otherwise known for their Guilty Gear and BlazBlue series of fighting games.

Published by VegettoEX
09 June 2017, 11:13 PM EDT1 Comment

In a press release posted earlier today on their website (and subsequently removed several hours later), Bandai Namco revealed Dragon Ball Fighters, a new video game under development by Arc System Works, set for release worldwide on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC (via Steam) in 2018. The new fighting game is slated to feature 3-on-3 battles in a “2.5D” presentation.

An innovative fighting game in the “Dragon Ball” series with “2.5D” graphics
“Dragon Ball Fighters”
Available worldwide in 2018!

Bandai Namco Entertainment (Main office: Minato-ku, Tokyo; president: Ooshita Satoshi) are launching the action game “Dragon Ball Fighters” in early 2018, for Playstation 4, Xbox One, and Steam, and featuring new “2.5D” anime graphics. This game, the latest in the series of “Dragon Ball” home console games, will be developed worldwide as a full-fledged “Dragon Ball” fighting game.

This current project is a genuine fighting game that distinguishes itself from previous entries in the “Dragon Ball” series. Its development is being handled by Arc System Works, who have handled numerous 2D fighting games that have won acclaim both in Japan and overseas, thoroughly recreating in-game the look of the “Dragon Ball” anime beloved around the world. You will be able to enjoy the world of “Dragon Ball” by experiencing battles overflowing with realism; it’s like an anime that you can move yourself.

Battles utilize 3-on-3 team fights, and you can enjoy strategic tactics such as mastering character affinities and building teams. In addition, this innovative fighting game incorporates the thrill of high-speed battles and flashy special attacks people have come to expect from “Dragon Ball”.

It is currently in development so that you can enjoy the world of “Dragon Ball” with new graphics. Please look forward to it.

Alongside the announcement, Bandai Namco producer Hiroki Tomoko provided a statement regarding the new game:

本作は2Dのアニメ表現と3Dの立体表現を融合した「2.5Dバトル」になっています。近年3Dの空間を動き回る「ドラゴンボール」ゲームが多かった中で、あえて2.5Dを選んだのは、それでしかできない表現があったからです。一見するとまるで2Dのアニメのように見えるものの、3Dで作っているからこそカメラが様々な角度で動かせるため表現の幅が広がり、2Dだけでも3Dだけでもできない独自の演出を沢山取り入れることができました。きっとプレイヤーのみなさんには、自分がリアルタイムにアニメを動かしているような感覚で、ドラゴンボールのバトルを体験いただけると思います。是非この作品でしか体験できないドラゴンボールにご期待ください。


This game has turned into a “2.5D battle” combining 2D anime presentation and 3D solid presentation. In recent years there have been many “Dragon Ball” games where you fly around through 3D space, so the reason for bothering to choose 2.5D is because there are some things only it can express. Although at first glance it looks just like 2D animation, since it’s made in 3D the camera can move to different angles, allowing for a wider range of expression and introducing many unique productions that are impossible in only 2D or 3D. I am sure that all the players will be able to experience “Dragon Ball” battles that feel like an anime they’re running in real time. Look forward to “Dragon Ball” battles you can only experience in this game.

Arc System Works previously developed Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butoden on the Nintendo 3DS, as well as the Super Sonic Warriors games (Bukū Tōgeki and Bukū Ressen) on the Nintendo Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS. The developer is otherwise known for their Guilty Gear and BlazBlue series of fighting games.

Dragon Ball Heroes: Ultimate Mission X for the Nintendo 3DS (released exclusively in Japan in April 2017) and Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2 (released worldwide in October/November 2016) represent the two latest games for the Dragon Ball franchise. Each game continues to receive post-launch support, with Ultimate Mission X getting a Version 1.1 update last month, and XENOVERSE 2 expecting its fourth major downloadable content pack this month.

UPDATE: The game’s title has since been revealed as a stylized “Dragon Ball FighterZ”. Additionally, in conjunction with E3, the American branch of Bandai Namco provided their own press release announcing the game:

DRAGON BALL’s SPECTACULARLY POWERFUL BATTLES RETURN IN BANDAI NAMCO ENTERTAINMENT AMERICA INC.’s DRAGON BALL FighterZ

DRAGON BALL FighterZ to Take Anime-Based Fighting Games in a Bold New Direction

LOS ANGELES, Calif., (June 11, 2017) – Leading anime video game developer and publisher BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment America Inc. today announces DRAGON BALL® FighterZ for Xbox One, PlayStation®4 computer entertainment system, and PCs via STEAM®. DRAGON BALL® FighterZ is a dream collaboration combining classic 2D fighting game dynamics with the DRAGON BALL universe, one of the most popular and iconic anime franchises around the world. DRAGON BALL FighterZ will be playable at the BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment America Inc. E3 2017 booth (number 1647) in the South Hall of the Los Angeles Convention Center.

DRAGON BALL FighterZ, developed by Arc System Works, one of the most celebrated developers of classic 2D fighting titles, delivers an explosive, action-packed game that combines classic 2D fighting visuals with advanced 3D character models that look and feel as if they are ripped straight out of the DRAGON BALL anime series.

DRAGON BALL FighterZ gives fans of all skill levels the opportunity to feel like their favorite DRAGON BALL character. Featuring 3 vs. 3 battle mechanics, new and seasoned players are sure to experience the epic scope of DRAGON BALL as they select their three-character team to take into battle. The game also encourages players to train and master more than one fighter and style, delivering richer gameplay and motivation to take down the competition.

“The DRAGON BALL franchise is tailor suited for the fighting game genre, and DRAGON BALL FighterZ will be the next exciting addition to a long history of great fighting games,” said Eric Hartness, Vice President of Marketing at BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment America Inc. “Arc System Works brings a pedigree and record of quality that fighting game fans can trust; with awesome visuals players might mistake as actual 2D animation from the famed DRAGON BALL series.”

Players who can’t wait to dive into the action in DRAGON BALL FighterZ‘s won’t have to wait long as a closed beta for the game will be held on Xbox One and PlayStation 4 before the end of summer. More details pertaining to the closed beta will be shared soon.

DRAGON BALL FighterZ will be available in the Americas for the Xbox One, PlayStation 4 system, and PCs via STEAM in early 2018. For more information regarding DRAGON BALL FighterZ and additional titles from BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment America Inc., please visit: https://www.bandainamcoent.com, or follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/BandaiNamcoUS, or https://www.facebook.com/DBZ.videogames/. Join the conversation on Twitter at: https://www.twitter.com/BandaiNamcoUS.

Published by VegettoEX
07 June 2017, 8:43 PM EDTComment

Dragon Ball Heroes: Ultimate Mission X for the Nintendo 3DS — the third and latest portable entry supporting the over-six-years-old, still-going-strong, card-based arcade game — launched in Japan 27 April 2017. According to the Media Create sales list for the reporting period of 29 May 2017 to 04 June 2017, the game pushed an additional 5,935 copies during its sixth week on sale, bringing its total sales to 158,859 copies in Japan.

By comparison, the original Ultimate Mission had sold 151,881 copies by its respective sixth week in April 2013, while Ultimate Mission 2 had done 137,142 copies by its respective sixth week in September 2014. The most recent Nintendo 3DS game prior to Ultimate Mission X‘s release — Ganbarion’s Dragon Ball Fusions — had pushed 152,418 total copies by its respective sixth week last September.

Dragon Ball Heroes: Ultimate Mission X received a Version 1.1 update last week adding a new Tenka’ichi Budōkai mode. As with the previous Dragon Ball Heroes games on the Nintendo 3DS, no international localization has been announced for Ultimate Mission X.

Published by VegettoEX
06 June 2017, 1:36 PM EDTComment

The third collected volume of Toyotarō’s Dragon Ball Super manga — originally and currently serialized on a monthly basis in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine — officially hit Japanese shelves 02 June 2017 for ¥400 + tax. Spanning 208 pages, the volume covers chapters 16 through 20. The volume takes its title of “0 Mortals Plan” (人間0計画 Ningen Zero Keikaku) directly from chapter 20 itself, both of which have the katakana spelling of ゼロ (zero) switched out for the numeral itself (with furigana) in this compilation.

Removing the dust jacket reveals tankōbon-styled front and back covers, with the back cover sporting a similar shot with an alternate set of characters:

Per the norm (to offset the odd number of pages per chapter), Toyotaro has included fun drawings between chapters ranging from comedic one-offs to a timeline explanation. In one drawing, Zamasu switches bodies with Monaka only to find out he is totally weak; next up he should switch with Goku as he originally planned!

Whereas the first two volumes included formal interviews with Toyotarō, this third volume includes two bonus pages where Toyotarō discusses the approval and revision process with original author Akira Toriyama. Toyotarō reflects on sending drafts of Zamasu and Kaiōshin where Toriyama later adjusted the hair volume and thinness of the eyes, as well as an adjustment from a surprised look to one that was “a little more dignified”. Toyotarō then thanks Toriyama for this reference material, which became invaluable for drawing the characters later on.

The first two volumes included short bonus chapters that were originally printed in the 2015 and 2016 Jump Victory Carnival attendee books. As this year’s event still has yet to occur, no similar bonus chapter had been produced in time for this third collected volume of the manga.

The third volume is available for purchase via CDJapan and Amazon Japan. A digital release will follow in Japan 04 July 2017.

The first collected edition saw its release in April 2016 covering the series’ first nine chapters, one spin-off chapter, and a special interview between Toyotarō and original author Akira Toriyama. The second collected edition saw its release last November covering the next six chapters, one more spin-off chapter, and a special interview with Toyotarō.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015 as a promotional tie-in for the television series. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ twenty-fourth chapter running last month in the magazine’s July 2017 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc to act as further promotion for the television series. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, which is now also published digitally in English day-and-date with its Japanese print release. The company’s first English print volume was released 02 May 2017.

The Dragon Ball Super television series now receives weekly simulcast streams on services such as Crunchyroll and Daisuki. FUNimation has also announced their American distribution license for the series, with the English dub beginning earlier this year on Cartoon Network, and a home release set to begin in July.

Published by VegettoEX
05 June 2017, 7:36 PM EDTComment

Japanese band Lacco Tower has announced that their song “Far Away” (遥 Haruka) will take over as the ninth ending theme song for the Dragon Ball Super television series beginning in July. The song will be produced by Seiji Kameda, marking the band’s first-ever collaboration with an external producer. The band’s vocalist Matsukawa Keisuke provided the following comment:

The “Earth’s Shenlong” who appears in Dragon Ball used to grant a single wish. Last year when we got to do an ending theme for Dragon Ball, in a way it felt like our wish had been granted. And now we’ve once again been entrusted with the important task of doing an ending theme. To top it off, they selected the precious tune “Far Away” which we developed. It feels just like we’ve been granted another wish.

“Planet Namek’s Shenlong (Porunga)” who appears in Dragon Ball can grant three wishes. This time another splendid thing happened to us: the new ending theme “Far Away” is being produced by the beloved Seiji Kameda-san. This marks the first time Lacco Tower has had a producer. There’s no better way to reach a new audience. Since we’ve got a producer, I wanted to make the greatest tune we could, one we could only make now.

With everything seeming like a dream come true, I’m not sure exactly what I’ll leave behind for everyone. However, I hope everyone will come along with this tune to make it into an ending theme fit for the mightiest of anime. Please take this opportunity to connect with Lacco Tower and with “Far Away”.

A TV-sized version of the song will be made available on Japanese digital platforms alongside its debut for ¥143 (plus tax). A traditional CD single has yet to be announced.

Lacco Tower previously contributed the song “Light Pink” as the third closing theme to the Dragon Ball Super television series.

CD singles for the show’s first eight ending themes — “Hello Hello Hello” by Good Morning America, “Starring Star” by KEYTALK, “Light Pink” by LACCO TOWER, “Forever Dreaming” by Czecho no Republic, “Easy-Going Dance” by Batten Showjo Tai, “Chao Fan MUSIC” by Arukara, “An Evil Angel and Righteous Devil” by THE COLLECTORS, and “Boogie Back” by Miyu Inoue — have been released. A CD single for the show’s first opening theme — “Chōzetsu ☆ Dynamic!” by Kazuya Yoshii — was released 07 October 2015. The series’ second opening theme — “Limit-Break x Survivor” by Kiyoshi Hikawa — does not yet have a CD single announced, though a TV-size version is available on certain Japanese digital provider sites.

Published by VegettoEX
02 June 2017, 9:00 AM EDTComment

Listings for the eighth DVD and Blu-ray Japanese home video box set of the Dragon Ball Super television series have begun to appear on retailer sites.

The set — due out 03 October 2017, coming only two months after the seventh box set — will cover episodes 85 to 96, continuing onward into the “Universe Survival arc” of the series. The set will also include a creditless version of the respective closing theme used during its batch of episodes. DVD boxes are priced at ¥12,096 while Blu-ray boxes are priced at ¥16,416.

The sixth DVD and Blu-ray box for the series (covering episodes 61-72) was released back in April. The series is currently being released as two-disc box sets in Japan; single-disc rental DVDs are available separately with their own unique cover art.

The Dragon Ball Super television series now receives weekly simulcast streams on services such as Crunchyroll and Daisuki. FUNimation has also announced their American distribution license for the series, with the English dub beginning earlier this year on Cartoon Network, and a home release set to begin in July.

Published by VegettoEX
31 May 2017, 9:22 PM EDTComment

Bandai Namco has released a Version 1.1 update for Dragon Ball Heroes: Ultimate Mission X on the Japanese Nintendo 3DS eShop, adding a new Tenka’ichi Budōkai mode.

In the new mode, players can complete in a tournament to move up the ranks as they challenge more difficult opponents, all the meanwhile unlocking more cards to use. The update requires 213 free blocks of storage on the Nintendo 3DS.

Dragon Ball Heroes: Ultimate Mission X for the Nintendo 3DS — the third and latest portable entry supporting the over-six-years-old, still-going-strong, card-based arcade game — launched in Japan 27 April 2017. The game has pushed 152,923 copies in Japan thus far.

Published by VegettoEX
31 May 2017, 9:15 AM EDTComment

Dragon Ball Heroes: Ultimate Mission X for the Nintendo 3DS — the third and latest portable entry supporting the over-six-years-old, still-going-strong, card-based arcade game — launched in Japan 27 April 2017. According to the Media Create sales list for the reporting period of 22 May 2017 to 28 May 2017, the game pushed an additional 6,515 copies during its fifth week on sale, bringing its total sales to 152,923 copies in Japan.

By comparison, the original Ultimate Mission had sold 140,208 copies by its respective fifth week in March 2013, while Ultimate Mission 2 had done 133,059 copies by its respective fifth week in September 2014. The most recent Nintendo 3DS game prior to Ultimate Mission X‘s release — Ganbarion’s Dragon Ball Fusions — had pushed 145,417 total copies by its respective fifth week last September.

Published by VegettoEX
30 May 2017, 8:22 AM EDTComment

Following a small tease in this month’s July 2017 issue of V-Jump magazine, Shueisha has revealed the cover art for the forthcoming third collected volume of the Dragon Ball Super manga:

Volume 3 of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s collected edition is due out in print in Japan 02 June 2017 for ¥400 spanning 208 pages. A digital release will follow 04 July 2017. The third volume is available for pre-order via CDJapan and Amazon Japan.

The first collected edition saw its release in April 2016 covering the series’ first nine chapters, one spin-off chapter, and a special interview between Toyotarō and original author Akira Toriyama. The second collected edition saw its release last November covering the next six chapters, one more spin-off chapter, and a special interview with Toyotarō. Since that volume’s release, an additional nine regular chapters have been serialized.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015 as a promotional tie-in for the television series. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ twenty-fourth chapter running this month in the magazine’s July 2017 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc to act as further promotion for the television series. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and is now published digitally in English day-and-date with its Japanese print release. The company’s first English print volume was released 02 May 2017.

The Dragon Ball Super television series now receives weekly simulcast streams on services such as Crunchyroll and Daisuki. FUNimation has also announced their American distribution license for the series, with the English dub beginning earlier this year on Cartoon Network, and a home release set to begin in July.