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Published by VegettoEX
24 August 2018, 10:43 AM EST1 Comment

A new Amazon listing for Viz’s fourth volume of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s print edition is dated for 01 January 2019 at a $9.99 MSRP. A digital edition will also be available at various retailers, including Amazon, Comixology, and direct from Viz.

Goku’s adventure from the best-selling classic manga Dragon Ball continues in this new series written by Akira Toriyama himself!

Ever since Goku became Earth’s greatest hero and gathered the seven Dragon Balls to defeat the evil Boo, his life on Earth has grown a little dull. But new threats loom overhead, and Goku and his friends will have to defend the planet once again in this continuation of Akira Toriyama’s best-selling series, Dragon Ball!

Goku Black’s identity has been revealed as Zamas, the lord of lords from Universe 10! But he’s not alone—his counterpart from the parallel universe has teamed up with him and, thanks to the super Dragon Balls, they are nearly unstoppable! In the present, Goku trains with Master Roshi to perfect the Mafuba and seal Zamas away. Meanwhile, Kaiô-shin takes Lord Gowas, Zamas’s mentor, to the parallel universe to try and push his former pupil back to being good!

The fourth collected edition is expected to cover chapters 21-24 a la its Japanese counterpart.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015 as a promotional tie-in for the television series. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ thirty-ninth chapter coming earlier this week in the magazine’s October 2018 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc to act as further promotion for the television series. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward telling its own version of the existing story. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition early last year.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub airing on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its fifth box set this October.

Viz is also set to release their translation of Dragon Garow Lee’s That Time I Got Reincarnated as Yamcha! manga this November.

Published by VegettoEX
21 August 2018, 8:37 PM ESTComments Off

Each month, Toyotarō provides a sketch — as well as a brief comment — on the official Japanese Dragon Ball website for a character that has not appeared in Dragon Ball Super. Thus far, Toyotarō has provided sketches of #8, Lunch, Chapa with Oob, Tambourine, Man-Wolf, Tapion, Janenba, and Broli. For his August entry, Toyotarō has contributed a sketch of Ozotto:

It’s Majin Ozotto. Apparently Toriyama-sensei designed him for an event, but I don’t really know that much about him. He’s a cool-looking character though, so I look forward to seeing what he’ll do next.

In conjunction with the “Jump Multi(media) World” event celebrating Weekly Shōnen Jump‘s 25th anniversary, the character debuted in Sega’s 1994 first-person arcade fighting game, Dragon Ball Z: V.R.V.S. “Majin Ozotto” (rendered in the game’s own English translation as “Ozotto the Super Monster”) is the shapeshifting final boss.

Akira Toriyama’s original design included a larger, multi-armed version which was not used in the final game; this design was most recently seen in the Dragon Ball 30th Anniversary Super History Book:

The character fell into relative-obscurity following his original release, with a planned appearance in the 1996 PlayStation and Saturn game Idainaru Dragon Ball Densetsu (“The Great Dragon Ball Legend”) unfortunately scrapped. Ozotto was finally resurrected this year in the card-based Japanese arcade game Super Dragon Ball Heroes. Ozotto makes a small appearance at the end of the “Universe Mission 3” update’s special video, and has been teased in the Super Dragon Ball Heroes promotional anime as a forthcoming opponent.

This sketch and comment set has been added to the respective page in our “Translations” archive.

Published by VegettoEX
21 August 2018, 9:50 AM ESTComments Off

In conjunction with Gamescom 2018 in Germany this week, Bandai Namco has shared a new trailer for the forthcoming Jump Force video game, (formally) revealing Dragon Ball‘s Vegeta as a playable character alongside other new character announcements from One Piece and Hunter x Hunter.

Previously-revealed Dragon Ball characters include Son Goku and Freeza.

Jump Force, a crossover fighting game in celebration of Jump‘s 50th anniversary, is slated for a worldwide release on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC (via Steam) some time in 2019. The game’s North American release is available for pre-order at Amazon.

Spike Chunsoft previously developed J-Stars Victory Vs., a crossover fighting game celebrating Jump‘s 45th anniversary; the game was originally released on the PlayStation 3 and Vita, with a PlayStation 4 port eventually coming alongside an international localization. Alongside Arale from Dr. Slump, Son Goku, Vegeta, and Freeza were the three Dragon Ball representatives in J-Stars Victory Vs.. Prior to this, the company developed the Sparking! (released internationally as “Budokai Tenkaichi”) and Raging Blast series of Dragon Ball fighting games.

Published by VegettoEX
21 August 2018, 8:28 AM ESTComments Off

Continuing onward from previous chapters, Viz has added their English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s thirty-ninth chapter to their website, moving further into the “Universe Survival arc” of the series. This continues Viz’s initiative of simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut, which saw its release today in the October 2018 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine in Japan.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015 as a promotional tie-in for the television series. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ thirty-ninth chapter coming today in the magazine’s October 2018 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc to act as further promotion for the television series. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward telling its own version of the existing story. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition early last year. The third collected volume was released in English from Viz last month.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub airing on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its fifth box set this October.

Published by VegettoEX
17 August 2018, 1:21 PM ESTComments Off

Following up on an ongoing retrospective series and previous interview with “Dragon Ball Room” head (and V-Jump editor-in-chief) Akio Iyoku, the Dragon Ball Official Site recently shared a new interview with Dragon Ball Super: Broli director Tatsuya Nagamine.

In the interview, Nagamine discusses his history with the franchise (from watching it as a child to working on the Dragon Ball Super television series), working original author Akira Toriyama’s screenplay into the finalized movie story, the new visual direction the team has gone with, and much more:

With the exception of action scenes, we’re adapting his screenplay pretty much as-is. However, though we want to be as faithful to it as possible, unfortunately the allotted run time is short. When we first made storyboards for the entire screenplay, a movie that was supposed to only be 90 minutes turned out to be double that length. Enough for two whole movies (laughs). Trying to forcefully condense that much content together would make it feel like a clip show, which would be boring, so I consulted with the producers and everyone else involved to whittle down the scenes and make it the proper length. We’re adamant about delivering as much of Toriyama’s script to viewers as possible, so we were able to extend the run time a little bit.

In my experience, since Dragon Ball is a series that has gone on a long time, we have impressions of what it should be. The movements to fire a Kamehameha or the setup of a Super Saiyan transformation scene are things that are so well-known they’ve become fixed. Maybe it would be fine to keep them the same, but transforming or firing beams from your hand are special things, so I want to make the staging for those moments special, too. The moment when I really came to that realization was when Toriyama gave us a manual during Dragon Ball Super about how to turn Super Saiyan. It said that the character gets tingles in their back, then imagines that sensation spreading outward and becomes Super Saiyan. I thought, “This is it!!” We can’t create this without using our physical senses as a basis. Transforming randomly without reason is no good. When I was a kid trying to shoot a Kamehameha or turn into a Super Saiyan, I always tried earnestly. The characters in the anime can’t just do it in an instant, either; they also have to try earnestly or it won’t work. I tell the animators to not be concerned about what was previously established, and I want them to draw how they feel using current techniques. If there’s inconsistency between how Dragon Ball has looked before and how we’re presenting it now, then I think it’s best to get rid of those past conceptions. Goku broke past his limits and evolved to Ultra Instinct, so we should follow suit and have the look evolve as well. At any rate, I want Dragon Ball to utilize the latest advancements and be on the cutting edge of action series. We’re not treating the series as something untouchable, and we want to create our own enjoyable Dragon Ball story.

READ THE FULL TRANSLATION

This interview has been archived in our “Translations” section. This particular entry comes courtesy of our new translation contributor, so be sure to give Stacey your thanks!

Published by VegettoEX
17 August 2018, 9:26 AM ESTComments Off

Voice actor Unshō Ishizuka, most recently known in the Dragon Ball franchise as the voice of Mr. Satan, has passed away at age 67. Ishizuka’s agency, Aoni Production, announced Ishizuka passed this previous Monday from esophageal cancer. A private wake was held, with details on a public ceremony yet to be revealed.

Ishizuka took over the role of Mr. Satan from the late Daisuke Gōri beginning in 2010 with Dragon Ball Z: Tag VS (“Tenkaichi Tag Team” internationally) on the PlayStation Portable. He continued this role in the “refreshed” Dragon Ball Kai television series and all projects moving forward.

Ishizuka’s career spanned decades with notable roles including Jet Black in Cowboy Bebop, the narrator and Professor Ōkido (“Oak”) in Pokémon, and recently the elder Joseph Joestar in the various Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure television series. In addition to Mr. Satan in Dragon Ball, Ishizuka had also taken over Gōri’s previous role of Heihachi Mishima in the Tekken video game series. With their equally-booming and gravely voices, Ishizuka could occasionally be found performing alongside Gōri himself, such as in the sixth episode of Cowboy Bebop.

In the June 2014 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, a dual-interview with Ishizuka and Kōzō Shioya (Boo’s voice actor) touched on Ishizuka’s replacement of the late Daisuke Gōri and the actors’ camaraderie moving forward:

Shioya: When the recording for Kai started, right off the bat, I asked, “who’s going to play Satan?” Then I learned that Ishizuka-san was going to play him, and I was incredibly happy.

Ishizuka: Thank you. (laughs)

Shioya: When you performed as Satan with me for the movie Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods], Ishizuka-san, it was easy to act, and the performance was fun.

Ishizuka: The studio is full of talented actors, so in a good way, I was able to act while goofing off, which was probably a good thing.

Published by VegettoEX
13 August 2018, 7:36 PM ESTComments Off

This week on the show we attempt to catch up with our Dragon Ball FighterZ commentary, and what better way to do that than alongside the biggest competition of the year?!

SHOW DESCRIPTION:
Episode #0452! Mike and Randy discuss “Dragon Ball FighterZ” and its debut at Evo 2018! How did the final eight shake out, what did the lineups look like, and what have we learned about the game since launch? Tune in for a nice overview of the tournament, and stick around for some extra news and website content!

SEGMENTS:

  • 00:13 – Introduction
  • 02:00 – News
  • 07:41 – Topic
  • 45:00 – Wrap-up

REFERENCED SITES:

Our podcast is available via iTunes and/or Google Play Music, or you can pop the direct RSS feed into the program of your choice. You can also listen to this episode by directly downloading the MP3 or by streaming it on SoundCloud or YouTube. We invite you to discuss this episode on our forum.

Published by VegettoEX
10 August 2018, 1:12 PM ESTComments Off

Following the initial reveal in conjunction with Evo 2018, a short promotional video for Coola has been released showcasing some of his special moves:

While the video is otherwise identical to the prior reveal, it concludes with a glimpse at the in-game alternate colors, player lobby character, and Z-Stamp that will accompany him for those that pay for access to the character.

The character will be made available at an unspecified future time individually for ¥500/$5, or as part of the game’s game’s optional $34.99 “FighterZ Pass” covering eight total characters. Broli, Bardock, Vegetto, Merged Zamasu, (non-Super Saiyan, “black hair”) Son Goku, and (non-Super Saiyan, “black hair”) Vegeta were the first six of eight promised paid downloadable characters released thus far; the announcement of Coola leaves one yet to be officially revealed.

The 3-on-3, “2.5D” fighting game is developed by Arc System Works and is currently available on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC (via Steam); on these systems, the game runs at a 1080p resolution and 60fps frame rate, with higher resolutions available on the PlayStation 4 Pro and Xbox One X consoles, as well as the PC. A Nintendo Switch port is due in 2018. Playable characters include Son Goku, Son Gohan (Cell arc design), Vegeta, Freeza, Cell, Boo (Good), Trunks, Piccolo, Kuririn, #16, #18 (with #17), Yamcha, Tenshinhan (with Chiaotzu), Ginyu (with teammates), Nappa (with Saibaimen), Gotenks, Son Gohan (Boo arc design), Boo (Pure), Hit, Beerus, and Goku Black (with Zamasu), as well as “Super Saiyan God Super Saiyan” (SSGSS, or “Super Saiyan Blue”) versions of Goku and Vegeta that can be accessed early via pre-orders or unlocked through gameplay. The Akira Toriyama-designed “#21” is a new character central to the game’s story mode.

Dragon Ball FighterZ was originally released 26 January 2018 in North America and Europe, and 01 February 2018 in Japan. Alongside its Japanese release, Bandai Namco announced that they had shipped two million copies of the game, making it the fastest-shipping game in the franchise’s history. The game ships on the Nintendo Switch next month.

Published by VegettoEX
09 August 2018, 11:43 AM EST1 Comment

Following their somewhat-unceremonious debut on streaming services, Toei Animation will release newly-remastered versions of the original 17 theatrical Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z films from the 1980s and 1990s across eight Blu-ray volumes beginning this November.

The initial run of the first volume will also contain a box that will store all eight volumes. Each release will include artwork by Tadayoshi Yamamuro as well as bonus items such as small booklets. The films will be presented in a 16:9 (widescreen) aspect ratio. Each individual volume is priced at ¥5,400 (~$49) on Amazon Japan.

02 November 2018

  • DRAGON BALL THE MOVIES Blu-ray Vol. 1
    Dragon Ball Z (DBZ Movie 1)
    The World’s Strongest Guy (DBZ Movie 2)
  • DRAGON BALL THE MOVIES Blu-ray Vol. 2
    A Super Decisive Battle for Earth (DBZ Movie 3)
    Super Saiyan Son Goku (DBZ Movie 4)
  • DRAGON BALL THE MOVIES Blu-ray Vol. 3
    The Incredible Strongest vs. Strongest (DBZ Movie 5)
    Clash!! 10,000,000,000 Powerful Warriors (DBZ Movie 6)

05 December 2018

  • DRAGON BALL THE MOVIES Blu-ray Vol. 4
    Extreme Battle!! The Three Great Super Saiyans (DBZ Movie 7)
    Burn Up!! A Red-Hot, Raging, Super-Fierce Fight (DBZ Movie 8)
  • DRAGON BALL THE MOVIES Blu-ray Vol. 5
    The Galaxy at the Brink!! The Super Incredible Guy (DBZ Movie 9)
    The Dangerous Duo! Super-Warriors Can’t Rest (DBZ Movie 10)
  • DRAGON BALL THE MOVIES Blu-ray Vol. 6
    Super-Warrior Defeat!! I’m the One Who’ll Win (DBZ Movie 11)
    The Rebirth of Fusion!! Goku and Vegeta (DBZ Movie 12)

09 January 2019

  • DRAGON BALL THE MOVIES Blu-ray Vol. 7
    Dragon Fist Explosion!! If Goku Won’t Do it, Who Will? (DBZ Movie 13)
    The Path to Ultimate Strength (10th Anniversary Movie)
  • DRAGON BALL THE MOVIES Blu-ray Vol. 8
    The Legend of Shenlong (DB Movie 1)
    The Sleeping Princess in Devil’s Castle (DB Movie 2)
    A Mystical Great Adventure (DB Movie 3)

The films last saw a home video release in Japan within 2006’s remastered “Dragon Box: The Movies” DVD box set which was subsequently broken out as individual DVD releases over the course of 2008-2009.

Published by VegettoEX
09 August 2018, 11:06 AM ESTComments Off

Bandai Namco has posted music lists for the upcoming Taiko no Tatsujin releases on PlayStation 4 (“Drum Session!”) and Nintendo Switch (“Drum ‘n’ Fun!”), each of which features a notable inclusion from the Dragon Ball franchise:

The PlayStation 4 game will include the second Dragon Ball Super television series opening theme song (“Limit-Break x Survivor“), while the Nintendo Switch game will feature the first Dragon Ball Z television series opening theme (“CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA“).

Both games hit their respective consoles 02 November 2018 in America, with varying physical/digital availability throughout the international markets.

The American version of the 2004 PlayStation 2 game — entitled Taiko Drum Master — featured the original Dragon Ball Z television series’ FUNimation English dub “Main Title” theme (“Rock the Dragon”).