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Published by VegettoEX
04 April 2016, 9:38 PM EDTComment

Cross Epoch, the 2006 manga collaboration between Dragon Ball‘s Akira Toriyama and One Piece‘s Ei’ichiro Oda, originally received an English-language translation in Viz’s Shonen Jump Issue #100 back in February 2011.

The special crossover chapter is finally due for a re-release with its inclusion in Viz’s upcoming third One Piece manga box set, due 04 October 2016 in North America. The inclusion was announced by Alexis Kirsch (current One Piece editor) during Viz’s 150th Shonen Jump podcast episode this week in response to a listener question regarding bonus content in the set:

It will be the One Piece / Dragon Ball crossover plus the One Piece / Toriko crossover.

Cross Epoch was originally published in the 2007 #4/5 issue of Weekly Shōnen Jump in Japan.

Thanks to the One Piece Podcast for the heads-up!

Published by VegettoEX
04 April 2016, 9:00 PM EDTComment

The May 2016 issue of Saikyō Jump in Japan (released 01 April 2016) has announced an upcoming “Digest Edition” (Sōshūhen) re-release of the Dragon Ball manga. Touted as allowing the reader to “enjoy Dragon Ball the same way as when it was serialized in Jump”, the volumes will be the same size as the original Weekly Shōnen Jump serialization (JIS B5; 18.2 × 25.7 cm) and will contain roughly 400–500 pages each, which should give readers a substantial chunk of the series with each volume. Page quality will likely be comparable to similar releases such as the One Piece “Log” or NarutoUzumaki Daikan” collections: magazine-format, with thinner paper than the Kanzenban, but better than Jump, with semi-glossy paper for full-color pages.

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The ad also puts special focus on the chapters that first appeared in color, along with their title pages, stating that volumes will “reproduce [the pages as] when they ran in Jump”; seemingly supporting this statement, the title page of Chapter 2 is seen with its promotional text along the bottom, which was removed for the Kanzenban release. It remains to be seen, however, whether this commitment also extends to items such as additional coloration, contemporary promotions or contests, and mistakes that were corrected for subsequent collected releases.

The first two volumes will hit Japanese shelves 13 May 2016. “Legend 1” will span 398-pages and retail for ¥500 + tax, while “Legend 2” will span 512-pages and retail for ¥600 + tax. “Legend 1” will include a “Son Goku” Dragon Ball Heroes card, while “Legend 2” will have a “Vegeta” card. “Legend 3” will follow 27 May 2016, with the second and fourth Friday of each subsequent month seeing one new volume apiece, whose details will likely be revealed as their release date draws closer.

Published by VegettoEX
01 April 2016, 9:23 AM EDTComments Off

Czecho No Republic posted an update to the band’s official Twitter account today detailing the upcoming debut of their new song “Forever Dreaming”, which will act as the fourth ending theme to the Dragon Ball Super TV series:

いよいよ4月3日(日)朝9時よりフジテレビ系TVアニメ『ドラゴンボール超』エンディング主題歌として「Forever Dreaming」が初オンエアとなります!!TVサイズ音源もiTunes、レコチョクほか各サイトにて配信スタート!


At last, on Sunday, April 3rd at 9 a.m., “Forever Dreaming” will air as Dragon Ball Super‘s ending theme for the first time! Downloads of the TV-size audio will also start via sites such as iTunes and Reco-Choku!

Last week, Lacco Tower (whose song “Light Pink” had been in use as the third ending theme) thanked fans on Twitter as well with a send-off to their song after its final use in the thirty-sixth episode:

本日でドラゴンボール超ED曲、LACCO TOWERの「薄紅」は最後でした。

国民的アニメ、ドラゴンボールに携われたこと、ほんとに誇りに思います!
これからもLACCO TOWERとドラゴンボールをよろしくお願いします!


Today was the last of Lacco Tower’s “Light Pink” as the ending for Dragon Ball Super.

We’re proud to have been able to be a part of this anime that’s so close to the heart of our country.
From here on out, please keep lending your support to both Lacco Tower and Dragon Ball!

A CD single for “Forever Dreaming” is due out 18 May 2016 in two versions: a “Czecho Version” (COZX-1174~5; ¥1700 + tax) and a “Dragon Ball Super” version (COCA-17191; ¥1200 + tax). Each will contain four tracks, with all but the title track still undecided at this point in time.

Czecho No Republic previously contributed “Oh Yeah!!!!!!!” as the fifth overall closing theme for the Japanese broadcast of Dragon Ball Kai.

Published by VegettoEX
28 March 2016, 11:51 AM EDT1 Comment

After hitting the ten-year mark just a few short months ago, our next podcast milestone was the big 4-0-0. Excuse our indulgence as we reminisce a bit on what the podcast means to us and our listeners before heading into our exciting topic for the week: an interview with longtime fan, friend, previous Dragon Ball fansite owner, and current Shueisha writer/superfan Greg Werner…!

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SHOW DESCRIPTION:
Episode #0400! VegettoEX invites a few friends of the show to look back at our past. Kirbopher pops in to reminisce about the podcast, its strengths and weaknesses, and what the future holds for us. Greg Werner then joins us for an interview about discovering the Dragon Ball series in America in the mid-1990s, developing one of the early fansites, navigating the increasingly-hostile and confusing fandom, writing for Beckett’s magazine, and making the transition to professional One Piece fandom. Here’s to another 400 episodes!

REFERENCED SITES:

Enjoy! Discuss this episode on the Kanzenshuu forum, and be sure to connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Google+, and Tumblr.

Published by VegettoEX
26 March 2016, 2:00 PM EDT1 Comment

Last November, Toonami Asia announced their Dragon Ball Super English-language debut for the Asia Pacific region. While details have been sparse since the original announcement, the company’s official Twitter account recently replied to a fan’s inquiry about an expected timeframe for the dubbed presentation, pegging July/August as the expected launch:

dbs_toonamiasia_summer

Toonami Asia is currently available in markets including Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, Pakistan, Maldives, and India. Though it is not yet clear which company will be producing this particular English dub, in all likelihood it will be a dub exclusive to these regions as has been done with previous series and films. Kanzenshuu has confirmed with FUNimation that the company is not involved with Toonami Asia’s presentation.

The ever-eagle-eyed WTK pointed out another licensing announcement: France will apparently receive the Dragon Ball Super TV series later in 2016, as per an entry on the Kazachok Licensing Forum’s official website.

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Après plusieurs décennies d’attente interminable, Son Goku revient dans une toute nouvelle pour devenir encore et toujours plus fort ! La série arrivera en France fin 2016 !


After several decades of interminable waiting, Goku returns in a brand new series to become even stronger! The series will arrive on TV in France end of 2016!

Toei’s European website has maintained an entry for the Dragon Ball Super TV series throughout its Japanese broadcast.

Dragon Ball Super currently airs Sunday mornings at 9:00 a.m. on Fuji TV in Japan. The series’ thirty-sixth episode airs this weekend.

Published by VegettoEX
25 March 2016, 9:17 AM EDTComments Off

Originally teased as Dragon Ball: Project Fusion, the upcoming Nintendo 3DS game has been unveiled as Dragon Ball Fusions in the May 2016 issue of V-Jump this week in Japan. The main promotional image for the game hypes up “the Astonishing Birth of the Forbidden Fusion Warrior, Karoli!” (a fusion of “Kakarrot” and Broli).

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The game will feature a new “EX Fusion” system utilizing a armband. With Kuririn as a base, three potential fusions are showcased:

  • Piririn (the result of an ordinary fusion with Piccolo)
  • Goririn (an EX Fusion with the boyhood version of Son Goku)
  • Kurigohan (an EX Fusion with the boyhood version of Son Gohan)

dbfusions_kuririn_fusions

“Piririn” is an original design by Akira Toriyama from a reader-created fusion contest announced in the 1995 #13 issue of Weekly Shōnen Jump in Japan.

The world of the game, where various different time periods are fused together, was created when you (the main character) and your friend Pinijji wished to Shenlong to “hold the mightiest of tournaments!” The goal of the game is to win the Jiku-Ichi Budōkai (“Strongest in Time and Space” Tournament).

The main character is promoted as your “alter-ego” and can be customized within five different races:

  • Namekians
  • Otherworlders
  • Aliens
  • Saiyans
  • Earthlings

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Dragon Ball Fusions is currently under development by Ganbarion for a nebulous 2016 release by Bandai Namco on the Nintendo 3DS in Japan. No international localization has been announced as-of-yet. The game’s official website has been updated with the new logo and title, with a promise for additional information in the near future.

Published by VegettoEX
20 March 2016, 4:44 PM EDTComments Off

English adaptations of Dragon Ball are littered with untranslated names, titles, and phrases: Kai, Baba, Senzu, Roshi, and even Majin, just to name a few. In each case, these words have perfectly fine equivalents in English. For “Majin” in particular (and even more specifically, with regard to “Majin Boo”), why is it that we rarely seem to get a translation? Or do we often get it translated, unbeknownst to the viewer or reader…?

majin_boo_podcast_topic_image

SHOW DESCRIPTION:
Episode #0399! VegettoEX and Herms break down “Majin” and the various ways it has been translated into English for the Dragon Ball franchise over the last several decades. Though we have gotten monster to genie to djinn and everywhere in between, most fans seem to stick with the untranslated phrase. Why is that, and if we were to operate in a bubble with a new translation, where might we take it?

REFERENCED SITES:

Enjoy! Discuss this episode on the Kanzenshuu forum, and be sure to connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Google+, and Tumblr.

Published by VegettoEX
19 March 2016, 10:27 PM EDTComments Off

Today’s thirty-fifth episode of the Dragon Ball Super TV series in Japan featured the debut of Kazuhiro Yamaji as the voice of the “legendary hitman” Hit, one of Champa’s Universe 6 tournament combatants.

dbs_hit_voice

Yamaji has played various roles in game, film, television, and stage presentations over the last several decades. He has also been the main Japanese dub voice for Hugh Jackman in the various X-Men franchise and other live-action films.

UPDATE: Oolong’s voice actor, and current series narrator, Naoki Tatsuta is heard providing the voice of Magetta in the episode. Tatsuta is not credited for Magetta (or his narration) in the episode due to already being credited for voicing Oolong.

Published by VegettoEX
15 March 2016, 6:39 AM EDTComments Off

In a Twitter post this morning, Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine revealed the cover art for the upcoming first collected volume of Toyotarō’s Dragon Ball Super manga adaptation:

toyotaro_cover_vjump_tease

The collected manga volume, due out 04 April 2016 in Japan, will span 192 pages and retail for ¥400 + tax. The specific chapter contents are thus far unknown. The volume is available for pre-order via CDJapan and Amazon Japan.

The title of the volume, “Warriors of Universe 6” (第6宇宙の戦士たち; Dai-Roku Uchū no Senshi-tachi), appears to be the same as that of the seventh chapter.

The tenth chapter of the Dragon Ball Super manga will be released this week, 19 March 2016, within the May 2016 issue of V-Jump in Japan.

Published by VegettoEX
14 March 2016, 2:34 PM EDT2 Comments

As noted during Episode #0398 of our podcast, the original Japanese Sony PlayStation and Sega Saturn discs for 1996’s Idainaru Dragon Ball Densetsu actually contain text files with stories, reflections, and funny anecdotes from the game’s development staff. In the text file, Graphic Artist “N” notes, while discussing the various characters unfortunately left out of the game:

Apart from that, we had designs on putting in Gogeta, Majin Ozotto, or even an original character (designed by the great Toriyama-sensei, natch), but due to the constraints of the schedule, we ever so regretfully had no choice but to abandon them.

“Majin Ozotto” (translated in-game as “Ozotto the Super Monster”) was an original creation from the 1994 Sega arcade game Dragon Ball Z: V.R.V.S. The monstrous villain would have been relatively contemporary to this game’s development, but unfortunately the schedule kept him, miscellaneous other characters, and even a brand-new Toriyama creation away from the final release.

This tidbit has been added to the “All DBZ Video Games Are Rushed, Unfinished Products” entry in the “Video Games” section of our “Rumor Guide“.