Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by Peach » Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:21 pm

If Uub becomes a big character again, he needs to be recasted.

This valley boy voice does not work with him. And it's totally insulting to have a caucasian person play him.

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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by WittyUsername » Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:33 pm

Peach wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:21 pm
If Uub becomes a big character again, he needs to be recasted.

This valley boy voice does not work with him. And it's totally insulting to have a caucasian person play him.
Valley boy?

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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by Melee_Sovereign » Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:39 pm

Locust wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:02 pm

Need proof of that, cause as a minority that sure as hell ain't my experience
Do you wear your ethnicity on your sleeve? I don't (i'm mixed black/white).

Affirmative action is an attempt to give minorities equal footing - how is that a double standard?
That's what the original intent was (perfectly fine), but in a lot of cases, it has lead to minorities being picked over majority individuals despite being less qualified. That's special treatment.

Also, I never said Affirmative Action was a double standard. What I said was a double standard is the idea that its wrong for a white person to voice a black character, but its acceptable that a black person voices a white character. That's blatantly a double standard.

I do not agree with bullshitty diversity hires.
That is not a way to progress - that making real humans into statistics, based on their ID. That's quite dehumanizing in it's own way.
What I simply want is a more honest discussions about racism within various industries. I do not see how suggesting casting agencies look at people from more diverse backgrounds is a wrong thing. I'd really like to understand.
That's all fine and dandy. This all stemmed from me originally disagreeing with the idea of "a black person can play a white character but not vice versa".

I'm all for equal opportunity.

I'm not attacking anyone?
Maybe I misunderstood you, but it seemed like you were saying its wrong for a white person to play (voice?) a black character. Even calling it "the opposite of progression". Even if said white person was hired based on merit.

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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by Locust » Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:55 pm

Melee_Sovereign wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:39 pm
Do you wear your ethnicity on your sleeve? I don't (i'm mixed black/white).
People need only take one look at me or see my name to know I'm not white - hardly need to make a song and dance of my race
That's what the original intent was (perfectly fine), but in a lot of cases, it has lead to minorities being picked over majority individuals despite being less qualified. That's special treatment.
Totally agree! That's not what I'm ok with - that's the sort of thing I mean when I say "bullshitty diversity hires" - that's quota filling, box ticking
Also, I never said Affirmative Action was a double standard. What I said was a double standard is the idea that its wrong for a white person to voice a black character, but its acceptable that a black person voices a white character. That's blatantly a double standard.
That's all fine and dandy. This all stemmed from me originally disagreeing with the idea of "a black person can play a white character but not vice versa".

I'm all for equal opportunity
In all honesty - for the most part, I don't have a huge problem with a white person voicing a POC (does depend a bit on context, what the role is, etc etc though), it's more the fact that a lot of the acting industry (voice or not) absolutely has issues when it comes to marginalised people getting chances

There is absolutely a slant towards white voice actors - what I would personally like? Just more opportunities for auditions for people that aren't white
There is most definitely a bit of a thing, speaking mainly of Western VAs, of picking from the same pool of people.
So for me - I just want that world to open up. There is surely not a lack of POC wanting to voice act - so it'd be good for the industry to just make it more accessible to them
And if that means "hey why not have someone of the same race as this char, have a shot at auditioning for the role?" then that's super
Maybe I misunderstood you, but it seemed like you were saying its wrong for a white person to play (voice?) a black character. Even calling it "the opposite of progression". Even if said white person was hired based on merit.
Reread the post - that wasn't me that said that, MyVisionity did (that sounds snarky, I don't mean to be, tone on the net and all)
Last edited by Locust on Sun Jul 05, 2020 7:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by MyVisionity » Sun Jul 05, 2020 7:06 pm

Melee_Sovereign wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 5:29 pm
MyVisionity wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 3:54 pm

White actors voicing Black characters is the opposite of minority progression. There's no "double standard" here. Or at least not one that matters.
All double standards matter. And that's not the opposite of progression. That's literally just someone getting the job because they're qualified for it.
It is in fact the opposite of minority progression. None of this is about simply who is "most qualified" for roles. It's about what it means for Black and minority characters to be voiced by White actors. It's about fighting White supremacy and racism in media. It's about fighting for representation of minorities in media. That includes fighting against White-controlled representations of minorities in media. Which includes the actors and casting.

If it were simply about who was "most qualified" for the role, and we lived in a world free of systemic racism, you might have a point. But it's not, and we don't.

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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by TheBlackPaladin » Sun Jul 05, 2020 7:48 pm

Locust wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:55 pm
In all honesty - for the most part, I don't have a huge problem with a white person voicing a POC (does depend a bit on context, what the role is, etc etc though), it's more the fact that a lot of the acting industry (voice or not) absolutely has issues when it comes to marginalised people getting chances

There is absolutely a slant towards white voice actors - what I would personally like? Just more opportunities for auditions for people that aren't white
There is most definitely a bit of a thing, speaking mainly of Western VAs, of picking from the same pool of people.
So for me - I just want that world to open up. There is surely not a lack of POC wanting to voice act - so it'd be good for the industry to just make it more accessible to them
And if that means "hey why not have someone of the same race as this char, have a shot at auditioning for the role?" then that's super
You 100% nailed what most in the VO community have been hearing from non-white voice actors in light of these recent discussions. Of course, not everybody's stance is universally the same, but what we're hearing very frequently is that the problem isn't so much that white voice actors are playing non-white roles so much as it is that non-white actors aren't even getting the auditions that most white actors are getting...not even, of all things, auditions for POC characters.
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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by jjgp1112 » Sun Jul 05, 2020 9:35 pm

I'm gonna side with ABED though on the whole notion that characters have to be portrayed by people who understand the experience of said character. That begs the question of what even is the point of acting if that's the case, as if there's no line between fantasy and reality.
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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by Peach » Sun Jul 05, 2020 9:37 pm

WittyUsername wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:33 pm
Peach wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:21 pm
If Uub becomes a big character again, he needs to be recasted.

This valley boy voice does not work with him. And it's totally insulting to have a caucasian person play him.
Valley boy?
Because of Funimation's extremely small talent pool during Z and GT, many of the characters are voiced by locals in the area. White people with southern accents. Bulma and Uub were played by white actors from small southern towns. Pan and Uub don't sound their age. Gohan and Kid Goku didn't either. It's very irritating.

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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by ABED » Sun Jul 05, 2020 9:39 pm

Peach wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 9:37 pm
WittyUsername wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:33 pm
Peach wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:21 pm
If Uub becomes a big character again, he needs to be recasted.

This valley boy voice does not work with him. And it's totally insulting to have a caucasian person play him.
Valley boy?
Because of Funimation's extremely small talent pool during Z and GT, many of the characters are voiced by locals in the area. White people with southern accents. Bulma and Uub were played by white actors from small southern towns. Pan and Uub don't sound their age. Gohan and Kid Goku didn't either. It's very irritating.
No child character sounds their age unless the actor is actually that age. It's a convention of the medium. As much as I love Nozawa even she doesn't sound like a 4 year old.
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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by WittyUsername » Sun Jul 05, 2020 9:44 pm

Peach wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 9:37 pm
WittyUsername wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:33 pm
Peach wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:21 pm
If Uub becomes a big character again, he needs to be recasted.

This valley boy voice does not work with him. And it's totally insulting to have a caucasian person play him.
Valley boy?
Because of Funimation's extremely small talent pool during Z and GT, many of the characters are voiced by locals in the area. White people with southern accents. Bulma and Uub were played by white actors from small southern towns. Pan and Uub don't sound their age. Gohan and Kid Goku didn't either. It's very irritating.
Neither Bulma nor Uub/Oob ever struck me as sounding particularly southern.

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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by Melee_Sovereign » Sun Jul 05, 2020 10:23 pm

Locust wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:55 pm

People need only take one look at me or see my name to know I'm not white - hardly need to make a song and dance of my race
That's not what I mean by "wearing your race on your sleeve". But actually, I don't feel like getting into that.

In all honesty - for the most part, I don't have a huge problem with a white person voicing a POC (does depend a bit on context, what the role is, etc etc though), it's more the fact that a lot of the acting industry (voice or not) absolutely has issues when it comes to marginalised people getting chances
I also agree that it depends on context. Now that said, if you're operating under the philosophy "just hire whoever fits", you'll likely arrive to the conclusion that a given minority character should be played by certain minority actor, under said context.

Hopefully that conclusion was arrived at after you've auditioned many different people. But for that to just be decided on way ahead of time, I just find odd and counter-productive. Sometimes it is the right choice for the background of the actor to align with the character they are playing. But sometimes it's not really necessary.

Reread the post - that wasn't me that said that, MyVisionity did (that sounds snarky, I don't mean to be, tone on the net and all)
Oh right, it wasn't you. By bad, sometimes I lose track of who says what in forum discussions.

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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by Sadala Elite » Sun Jul 05, 2020 10:46 pm

jjgp1112 wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 9:35 pm
I'm gonna side with ABED though on the whole notion that characters have to be portrayed by people who understand the experience of said character. That begs the question of what even is the point of acting if that's the case, as if there's no line between fantasy and reality.


Exactly. Isn't the entire point of acting is to pretend to be someone else?

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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by TheBlackPaladin » Sun Jul 05, 2020 11:36 pm

Peach wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 9:37 pm
Because of Funimation's extremely small talent pool during Z and GT, many of the characters are voiced by locals in the area. White people with southern accents.
One of the very interesting things about how the pandemic has affected the dubbing industry is that most dubs are being recorded from home studios during this time. There are some professional studios that are up and running and following some form of safety protocol for voice actors who don't have very good home studios, but pretty much every voice actor who can record from home with good audio quality is opting to stay the hell out of studios for now. Sadly, there's one or two studios I've heard of that have insisted that voice actors come in, that recording from home won't be an option, and that if they don't, they will be re-cast. These studios are jerks, to put it lightly, and the overwhelming majority of the actors who got that notice basically told those studios, "Fine, re-cast me."

In any event, since pretty much all dubs are being recorded from home, that has led to a lot of talent pool crossovers as far as geographic locations are concerned. Lots of LA actors appearing in New York dubs, Dallas actors appearing in LA dubs, etc. There are mixed thoughts on whether or not this will remain the case once the pandemic is over. There are tons of logistical nightmares involved with remotely recording a dub, and normally studios wouldn't even consider doing that...but, yeah, we're not living in normal times. Logistical and technical nightmares aside, FUNimation--and every other dubbing studio--can basically have any actor they want now as far as geography is concerned. Hopefully this opens the door even more to non-white actors.
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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by Cursed Lemon » Tue Jul 07, 2020 6:08 pm

There's been a big hooplah about the VO of Diane from Bojack Horseman being white while the character of Diane is Vietnamese. I contend that if we were speaking of a character from the Boondocks, where not only is the cast majority black but the show itself is a direct commentary on the experience of black Americans, having a white VO cast for a black character would be inappropriate. However, Diane's race has nothing to do with her character, in fact it might have less than nothing to do with her character. She is ethnically Vietnamese but her family are hardline Boston stereotypes, and the only interaction she has with her culture is a flippant trip to Vietnam where she attempts to connect with her cultural "roots", only to come to the conclusion that the whole idea was completely bunk. Not a single conflict in her character arc is race-related and in fact her race is barely spoken of across six whole seasons. Her voice actress put out a statement saying that she wish she wouldn't have taken the role; I'm gonna go ahead and stick my neck out to assert that statement was made under duress. For emphasis, she was very good as Diane.

If the world of voice acting has been difficult to break into for POCs, whether because of active racism or because of benign nepotism, I'm all for efforts to locate and incorporate them into the fold. However, and I say this as godless liberal filth, the lack of nuance/discretion that gives way to mindless mob action by my side of the aisle when it comes to matters like these is intensely annoying.
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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by G1Ravage » Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:21 pm

Cursed Lemon wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 6:08 pm
If the world of voice acting has been difficult to break into for POCs, whether because of active racism or because of benign nepotism, I'm all for efforts to locate and incorporate them into the fold. However, and I say this as godless liberal filth, the lack of nuance/discretion that gives way to mindless mob action by my side of the aisle when it comes to matters like these is intensely annoying.
I agree 150%.

I know many voice actors by name, and who they voice, but typically know next to nothing about what they look like, or where they hail from...unless I happen to visit their wiki page, or see a video of them at a convention panel. As audio commentary tracks on anime releases, as well as video commentary tracks, are becoming more common, I've been pleasantly surprised to learn that there were many more black voice actors in the industry than I realized. (Over the past seven years or so, especially.)

I'm sure that some of that has to do with casting directors trying to have more of a keen eye when searching for talent, and are actually seeking out a more diverse talent pool to pull from. But I also believe that a lot of it is simply happening naturally. Back in the early days of anime dubbing, it was a much, MUCH smaller pool of voice actors. For both time, money, and convenience, they would use whatever talent they had on hand to voice multiple characters in an episode. Breaking into the industry required having a background in acting, and knowing the right people. You can't put together a pool of qualified, diverse actors if these other ethnic groups weren't going into theater in large numbers to begin with. (Or, weren't interested in voice acting, OR lived in locations not known as voice acting hubs, like New York, Dallas, or Los Angeles.)

But just as those in the sakuga fandom refer to the "web-gen" generation of animators who are now breaking into animation in Japan in a big way, we also now have a very diverse and talented class of anime fans who grew up *wanting* to become voice actors, attended many voice actor panels at conventions, listened to their advice, and made the right moves. Almost anyone today with a modicum of talent and ambition can put together a demo tape in their own home, and send it out. Voice acting as a profession is much more prolific and known today, than it has ever been in the past. As such, many more people of all backgrounds are jumping into the pool.

In an audio commentary for the recent One Piece DVD that came out a few weeks ago, FUNimation voice actress Kara Edwards (I believe it was her) talked about how she got her start with FUNimation. If you'll recall, her first roles were on the ollllllld dub of Dragon Ball Z, where she voiced Goten and Videl. FUNimation was looking to expand their pool of talent. So you know what they did? They put an ad out in a local paper. That was it. You don't buy the paper? You ain't gonna see it. Both Kara Edwards and Kyle Hebert auditioned with FUNimation from these ads.

I don't know how many people actually responded to these ads. I'm sure they would have accepted any talent, regardless of race, as long as they auditioned well. I've certainly never heard anyone accuse FUNimation of racial bias in their hiring practices. But such was the times they were in. If they only got 15 decent actors from the auditions, and only two were black, then that was what they had to work with. A lot of the dubbing they were doing was for broadcast TV, and they were no doubt on a tight deadline to get things done. According to the 2000 census, 25% of the Dallas area residents were black. That number actually decreased by 2% in the 2010 census. But two black actors out of 15 would be roughly inline with the overall representation of their population in Dallas. (25% of 15 is 3.75.)

I would say that diversity in acting is definitely universally better in America today, and that's a wonderful thing.

Me personally, I treat actors performing as other races or 'abilities' the same way I treat comedy...with context. There are some horribly dirty comics out there (of all backgrounds and genders) who do some really dirty stand-up, but it's also really funny. As someone with a sense of humor, I appreciate that. If the humor is directed against my own personal heritage or religion, it doesn't bother me in the least. Sometimes I feel slightly uncomfortable for a split second, and then I bust out laughing when I realize how true it is. I remember that we're there to laugh and enjoy ourselves, and that the comic riffs on everyone equally.

If no offense is intended, I take none. End of story. I'm a glass half full type of person.

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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by WittyUsername » Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:41 pm

At this point, I think I feel comfortable in saying that people like Hank Azaria and Mike Henry shouldn’t have stepped down from their roles. Not only do I seriously doubt that many people still care about The Simpsons or Family Guy, but those guys had already been voicing their respective characters for decades. Unless you go back and redub every single one of their past lines, that can’t be undone.

I‘m gonna be honest, I don’t think Apu being voiced by a man of Indian descent or Cleveland being voiced by a black man is going to change much in the grand scheme of things. It’s just going to fuel this mentality among a number of Internet circles that PC culture is full of a bunch of bullies who will antagonize and shame anyone who don’t meet their standards of political correctness, which is harmful to the cause in the long run. That’s precisely the kind of thing that South Park spent an entire season making fun of.

Sure, representation is a good idea, but instead of dwelling on some supporting characters in a couple of animated sitcoms that are long past their respective primes, I think the efforts would be better spent on newer stuff. I mean, are people really looking for representation in a show as notoriously edgy and offensive as Family Guy?

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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by G1Ravage » Tue Jul 07, 2020 9:06 pm

WittyUsername wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:41 pm
I‘m gonna be honest, I don’t think Apu being voiced by a man of Indian descent or Cleveland being voiced by a black man is going to change much in the grand scheme of things. It’s just going to fuel this mentality among a number of Internet circles that PC culture is full of a bunch of bullies who will antagonize and shame anyone who don’t meet their standards of political correctness, which is harmful to the cause in the long run. That’s precisely the kind of thing that South Park spent an entire season making fun of.

Sure, representation is a good idea, but instead of dwelling on some supporting characters in a couple of animated sitcoms that are long past their respective primes, I think the efforts would be better spent on newer stuff. I mean, are people really looking for representation in a show as notoriously edgy and offensive as Family Guy?
Good points as well. Part of the problem is this overwhelming feeling that people (especially white people) need to feel offended on behalf of underrepresented groups. In many instances (Apu included), I see just as many people of color state that they have no issue with it, as I see white people who do have an issue with it. Once it reaches the realm of Internet discussions, certain topics can somehow take on a much larger scale than people actually care about. Twitter does not represent the real world by any margin. Opinions will always vary wildly, and unless you somehow poll every single person on the planet, you'll never know whether the majority are for it, or against it. Whether the matter is even important or not also varies wildly from person to person.

At the end of the day, I personally feel that these gestures by these voice actors to step down from their roles is merely symbolic, further divides people on the issues, and does nothing to help what the true issues are. If Cleveland as a character remains, and is recast with a black actor, how will he be voiced? Will the new actor mimic the old voice? If so, what was the point? If an entirely new voice is used, it'll change the character, and it'll just remind people of this whole mess of a year.

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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by JulieYBM » Tue Jul 07, 2020 9:07 pm

WittyUsername wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:41 pm
At this point, I think I feel comfortable in saying that people like Hank Azaria and Mike Henry shouldn’t have stepped down from their roles. Not only do I seriously doubt that many people still care about The Simpsons or Family Guy, but those guys had already been voicing their respective characters for decades. Unless you go back and redub every single one of their past lines, that can’t be undone.

I‘m gonna be honest, I don’t think Apu being voiced by a man of Indian descent or Cleveland being voiced by a black man is going to change much in the grand scheme of things. It’s just going to fuel this mentality among a number of Internet circles that PC culture is full of a bunch of bullies who will antagonize and shame anyone who don’t meet their standards of political correctness, which is harmful to the cause in the long run. That’s precisely the kind of thing that South Park spent an entire season making fun of.
Boo fuckin' hoo. Who gives a flipping fuck what bigoted asswipes think?
WittyUsername wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:41 pm
Sure, representation is a good idea, but instead of dwelling on some supporting characters in a couple of animated sitcoms that are long past their respective primes, I think the efforts would be better spent on newer stuff. I mean, are people really looking for representation in a show as notoriously edgy and offensive as Family Guy?
Who represents characters matter, on all stages of production and at the stage of reception from the audience. The portrayals we see of a minority group on screen are important because the stories studios decide to tell and the manner in which they decide to tell them informs not only cishet Whites, they inform the minority groups themselves. The self-hating minority does exist, you know. Cultural feedback from both family and media plays an important part in how people see themselves.

I'm doubtlessly projecting a little since I'm part of a minority group that gets massive amounts of negative media portrayals in media and on principle alone I reject similar happening to other groups. I think it's really, really disgusting to have a minority group portrayed in our media--especially our popular media--and then have that minority group's voice completely ignored.
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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by WittyUsername » Tue Jul 07, 2020 9:15 pm

JulieYBM wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 9:07 pm
WittyUsername wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:41 pm
At this point, I think I feel comfortable in saying that people like Hank Azaria and Mike Henry shouldn’t have stepped down from their roles. Not only do I seriously doubt that many people still care about The Simpsons or Family Guy, but those guys had already been voicing their respective characters for decades. Unless you go back and redub every single one of their past lines, that can’t be undone.

I‘m gonna be honest, I don’t think Apu being voiced by a man of Indian descent or Cleveland being voiced by a black man is going to change much in the grand scheme of things. It’s just going to fuel this mentality among a number of Internet circles that PC culture is full of a bunch of bullies who will antagonize and shame anyone who don’t meet their standards of political correctness, which is harmful to the cause in the long run. That’s precisely the kind of thing that South Park spent an entire season making fun of.
Boo fuckin' hoo. Who gives a flipping fuck what bigoted asswipes think?
WittyUsername wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:41 pm
Sure, representation is a good idea, but instead of dwelling on some supporting characters in a couple of animated sitcoms that are long past their respective primes, I think the efforts would be better spent on newer stuff. I mean, are people really looking for representation in a show as notoriously edgy and offensive as Family Guy?
Who represents characters matter, on all stages of production and at the stage of reception from the audience. The portrayals we see of a minority on screen are important because the stories studios decide to tell and the manner in which they decide to tell them informs not only cishet Whites, they inform the minorities themselves. The self-hating minority does exist, you know. Cultural feedback from both family and media plays an important part in how people see themselves.

I'm doubtlessly projecting a little since I'm part of a minority group that gets massive amounts of negative media portrayals in media and on principle alone I reject similar happening to other groups. I think it's really, really disgusting to have a minority group portrayed in our media--especially our popular media--and then have that minority group's voice completely ignored.
I’m not talking about bigots. I’m talking about potential allies. When fighting for any cause, it’s important to avoid leaving a bad impression to the people who are undecided on the matter. Alienating people from any given cause is never a good idea.

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Re: Minority representation for minority characters in Voice acting

Post by JulieYBM » Tue Jul 07, 2020 9:34 pm

WittyUsername wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 9:15 pm
I’m not talking about bigots. I’m talking about potential allies. When fighting for any cause, it’s important to avoid leaving a bad impression to the people who are undecided on the matter. Alienating people from any given cause is never a good idea.
What's the compromise between people who think you shouldn't have direct control over the manner in which the media portrays you and your plights? Making minority groups out to be The Bad Guy is not a particularly rational thing to do.

"You know, I was going to support those [various slurs] but then they recast Cleveland and Quagmire's faggot tranny dadd--I'm sorry, I meant 'mommy'--and now I'm going to shit my pants and not change my pants until I get my way!"

Family Guy and The Cleveland Show1 are massive pop culture influences. It should be scrutinized. Speaking toward a concern of mine, how many trans kids--especially trans kids of color--and teens are going to see shit like that and think that they're monsters? This is the sort of thing we need to be preventing in future media and it starts with involving minority groups in their media portrayal. Using different actors in future episodes is the first step.

1The more research I do into these shows the more sick I become. Jesus fuck.
She/Her | Practice self-care.

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