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Published by Hujio
10 August 2021, 9:50 AM EDTComment

Each week the recently revamped Dragon Ball Official Site posts a short “Weekly Dragon Ball News” video highlighting the franchise’s most recent news, often focusing on upcoming merchandise. In this week’s video, Dragon Ball Super manga author Toyotarō sat down with the segment’s regular host, and his own editor, “Victory Uchida” to share some behind-the-scenes information about the currently ongoing “Granolla the Survivor” story arc and promote the manga series’ 16th collected volume, which was recently released 04 August 2021.

The video is available subtitled in multiple languages, including English, for all to enjoy. However, we have compiled these main highlights from the interview:

  • After considering bringing back an existing character, Toyotarō ended up making the pitch to Uchida for his own original character Granolla, who would have ties with the Saiyans. The two then developed a general story idea around the character before submitting it to original author Akira Toriyama for review.
  • Toriyama took Toyotarō’s idea and expanded on it, creating a full-fledged story around Granolla. This included adding the Heatas and creating a new set of Dragon Balls, which Toyotarō felt only the original author had the authority to do.
  • Toyotarō's Heatas Design

  • Concerning Granolla’s design, Toyotarō focused on the fact that he was a survivor. However, Toriyama also noted to him that they were not a race with a warrior culture, but were nevertheless militaristic. Not knowing exactly what that meant, Toyotarō settled on a race of sharpshooters, with Granolla being a sniper and incorporating goggles to help with his aim. Being the survivor of an old, near extinct race, he wanted Granollna to have a bit of a retro feel in his design; hence the steampunk aesthetic.
  • Toyotarō's Granolla Design

  • Following Toriyama’s advice of having characters show up in pairs, Oatmeal was added to the story to counter the silence a lone, solitary warrior such as Granolla would create. Oatmeal helps the story move along without requiring Granolla to talk to himself, or have the reader unable to tell what he’s thinking.
  • Toyotarō discusses his attempts to design the Heatas, which were rejected 3 or 4 times before he settled on their final design. While he did twice attempt to design the Sugarians, he kept getting comments back that the “eyes look weird”, so ultimately Toriyama handled them.

Toyotarō will also appear on next week’s “Weekly Dragon Ball News” segment to provide a tutorial on how to draw Granolla, which will be posted on Monday, August 16th.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ seventy-fourth chapter coming today in the magazine’s September 2021 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” and “Granolla the Survivor” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. The fourteenth collected volume is due this September.

Published by VegettoEX
09 August 2021, 10:37 AM EDTComment

Last week’s September 2021 issue of Shueisha’s Saikyō Jump magazine kicked off a new “Dragon Ball Super Gallery” series in commemoration of the Dragon Ball franchise’s upcoming 40th anniversary.

The first contribution to the series, which aims to have different artists all contribute their own spin on the original 42 tankōbon covers, comes courtesy of Masashi Kishimoto (Naruto). The image — Kishimoto’s take on the 11th tankōbon cover — and its accompanying comment are published on the back cover of the magazine; a clean version of the image was also distributed to press in Japan and featured on the official Saikyō Jump website:

Kishimoto commented:

Out of all the many characters in Dragon Ball, my favorite is Kuririn. As I read, I could really empathize with the guy desperately chasing behind the stronger Goku, who was always out in front. I could hardly contain my love for chapters where Kuririn got to play a major role. Congratulations on Dragon Ball‘s 40th anniversary!

The image uses the refreshed 2009 branding style of the tankōbon covers, which lost the solid color banding and corresponding thin lines in favor of larger, separate, and bold “D” and “B” lettering in green with yellow borders.

Saikyō Jump (“The Strongest Jump”) is currently a monthly magazine published in Japan by Shueisha under the “Jump” line of magazines. The magazine began as a quarterly publication in 2012, went monthly in 2013, went bimonthly in late-2014, and returned to a monthly format this month. The magazine’s focus is spin-off and supplementary manga series aimed at a young audience, while also including game promotions, news coverage, and more. The magazine currently serializes content such as Yoshitaka Nagayama’s Super Dragon Ball Heroes: Big Bang Mission!!! and the Dragon Ball GT Anime Comic. For calendar year 2018, Saikyō Jump‘s readership comprised of 58.5% in upper elementary school, 28% in lower middle school, 11% in middle school, and 2.5% in high school or older.

Kishimoto is a long-time fan of the Dragon Ball franchise, noting Akira Toriyama as a source of inspiration. The first run of kanzenban editions of the Dragon Ball manga released from 2003 to 2004 included bonus pamphlets, with every other volume featuring a tribute image and comment from a fellow manga author/artist. Following the debut from Ei’ichirō Oda (One Piece), Kishimoto took the second slot with an image of Son Goku and Kuririn at the Tenka’ichi Budōkai:

Published by Hujio
09 August 2021, 8:36 AM EDTComment

As scheduled, a pre-recorded Comic-Con@Home panel covering the previously announced Dragon Ball Super 2022 film was posted online at 1:00pm EDT on 23 July 2021. The panel featured voice actress Masako Nozawa (Son Goku), Toei Animation producer Norihiro Hayashida, and Shueisha executive producer Akio Iyoku.

Following a “live” performance of “CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA” by Hironobu Kageyama, the panel’s host, Sascha, unveiled the upcoming film’s official title: Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero.

With the reveal of the film’s new title, Akio Iyoku remarked (per the panel’s included subtitles) that, “There’s two ‘supers’ in there, which is great! We really wanted to emphasize that this movie is all about the superhero vibes. Toriyama-sensei, as before, is really focusing on the superhero aspect this time.” As with the previous three films, original author Akira Toriyama is heavily involved with the film’s production, once again providing both the story, script, and character designs. Several of the film’s character designs were also showcased during the panel, including Piccolo, Kuririn, and Pan. As Akio Iyoku points out, Piccolo’s arms are now yellow and his sash (obi) is red, as opposed to pink and blue as used in the TV series up to this point. These colors fall inline with the colors established in the manga, bringing the two mediums more closer together than ever before.

At the moment no specific details are known about the film’s plot, but the panel did provide the first original character designs from Akira Toriyama for the new film, as well as the debut of the setting design for Piccolo’s home on Earth.

While a definitive release date has not been set, it is slated for sometime in 2022. As with the franchise’s most recent film, a simultaneous globalized released is anticipated. To conclude the panel, a preview teaser trailer was debuted, with the panelists providing their own personal thoughts. The trailer showcases an original sequence, that will not appear in the film, to demonstrate the new CG look and style that this film will utilize. Iyoku specifically noted that they wanted to showcase “his movement and feeling” and they are “using different technologies” for this production.

Shortly after the panel’s conclusion, the revamped Dragon Ball Official Site unveiled the film’s official website (https://2022dbs.com), which currently only contains Toriyama’s original comment, the teaser trailer, and a video of the full “Dragon Ball Special” discussion panel at Comic-Con.

Published by VegettoEX
21 July 2021, 11:46 AM EDTComments Off

Each month, Toyotarō provides a drawing of a Dragon Ball character — as well as an accompanying comment — on the official Japanese Dragon Ball website. Following up on the wealth of characters already drawn, for his July 2021 entry, Toyotarō has contributed a drawing of Paikuhan (and others!) from the Afterlife Tournament filler arc of the Dragon Ball Z television series.

Paikuhan
and Other Afterlife Tournament Competitors

From the top it’s ↑ Tolbee, → Furog, ← Caterpie, and ↓ Tapicar!

This drawing and comment set has been added to the respective page in our “Translations” archive.

Published by VegettoEX
20 July 2021, 9:21 PM EDTComments Off

Continuing onward from previous chapters, Shueisha and Viz have added the official English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s seventy-fourth chapter to their respective Manga Plus and Shonen Jump services, continuing the brand-new “Granolla the Survivor arc”. Alongside other initiatives including free chapters and a larger archive for paid subscribers, this release continues the companies’ schedule of not simply simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut to the release date, but to its local time in Japan alongside its serialization in today’s September 2021 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ seventy-fourth chapter coming today in the magazine’s September 2021 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” and “Granolla the Survivor” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. The fourteenth collected volume is due this September.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set last year.

Published by VegettoEX
23 June 2021, 12:47 PM EDTComments Off,

Shueisha has listed the sixteenth collected volume of the Dragon Ball Super manga series by Toyotarō and the second collected volume of the Super Dragon Ball Heroes: Big Bang Mission!!! manga series by Yoshitaka Nagayama as releasing 04 August 2021 in Japan for ¥484 each.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ seventy-third chapter coming this week in the magazine’s August 2021 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” and “Granolla the Survivor” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. The fourteenth collected volume is due this September.

Yoshitaka Nagayama debuted in a supplemental booklet packed in with the December 2013 issue of Saikyō Jump, with Dragon Ball Heroes: Rookie Charisma Mission Episode 0 depicting the daily life and “training” of Engineer Yoshito and new Battle Navigators Tsubasa and Momo-chan in a cartoony style. The series eventually received its own standard serialization in Saikyō Jump beginning in the July 2014 issue, followed by the traditional story serials of Dark Demon Realm Mission! beginning in the September 2016 issue, Universe Mission!! beginning in the May 2018 issue, and now the latest and current series, Big Bang Mission!!!, beginning in the May 2020 issue. The prior two series have been collected in full, and the first collected volume of the Big Bang Mission!!! series saw a release back in December 2020. The various Dragon Ball Heroes manga series remain without an official English translation and release.

Published by VegettoEX
22 June 2021, 2:52 PM EDTComments Off

The latest addition to our “Press Archive” is another fun blast-from-the-past: a general overview of the “anime invasion” from the August 14, 1995 issue of Newsweek, which happens to also mention the impending broadcast of FUNimation’s English dub of the Dragon Ball television series.

Imported by cultists since the ’60s, Japanese animation, or “anime,” is infiltrating the mainstream. Michael Jackson’s “Scream” video lifts images from the anime (pronounced ANNI-may) classic “Akira.” Next month, two Japanese children’s shows, “Sailor Moon” and “Dragon Ball,” will hit Saturday-morning TV here and could ignite the next big merchandising frenzy this Christmas.

Enjoy this article over in our “Press Archive” along with over 100 other historical articles and columns from trade publications as well as video game and anime magazines of the era.

Published by VegettoEX
22 June 2021, 11:39 AM EDTComments Off

Each month, Toyotarō provides a drawing of a Dragon Ball character — as well as an accompanying comment — on the official Japanese Dragon Ball website. Following up on the wealth of characters already drawn, for his June 2021 entry, Toyotarō has contributed a drawing of Chop Chai from the Afterlife Tournament filler arc of the Dragon Ball Z television series.

Chop Chai

He’s a competitor in the Afterlife Tournament. His specialty seems to be splitting into multiple copies of himself. Perhaps doing a match on a team that’s made up entirely of yourselves is the best kind of teamwork?

Chop Chai is likely named after an Indonesian fried noodle dish called Chapuchai (チャプチャイ) in Japanese or cap cai in Indonesian. Many Afterlife Tournament characters are named for foods, with Migoren and Sarte both being similarly named after Indonesian dishes.

Toyotarō noted on Twitter that he will continue with the Afterlife Tournament characters for the foreseeable future in this monthly column.

This drawing and comment set has been added to the respective page in our “Translations” archive.

Published by VegettoEX
22 June 2021, 11:29 AM EDTComments Off

Continuing onward from previous chapters, Shueisha and Viz have added the official English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s seventy-third chapter to their respective Manga Plus and Shonen Jump services, continuing the brand-new “Granolla the Survivor arc”. Alongside other initiatives including free chapters and a larger archive for paid subscribers, this release continues the companies’ schedule of not simply simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut to the release date, but to its local time in Japan alongside its serialization in this week’s August 2021 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ seventy-third chapter coming this week in the magazine’s August 2021 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” and “Granolla the Survivor” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. The fourteenth collected volume is due this September.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set last year.

Published by VegettoEX
08 June 2021, 10:07 AM EDTComments Off

The latest addition to our “Press Archive” is another fun blast-from-the-past: an Internal Correspondence article from the April 1995 issue announcing the forthcoming syndication broadcast debut of the original Dragon Ball television series from FUNimation.

The article is also noteworthy for mentioning Viz’s ongoing negotiations for their Dragon Ball manga license, which was still almost three years off from this point.

Enjoy this article over in our “Press Archive” along with over 100 other historical articles and columns from trade publications as well as video game and anime magazines of the era.