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Published by VegettoEX
25 February 2020, 8:49 AM ESTComments Off

Each month, Toyotarō provides a drawing — as well as a brief comment — on the official Japanese Dragon Ball website. Thus far, Toyotarō has provided drawings of #8, Lunch, Chapa with Oob, Tambourine, Man-Wolf, Tapion, Janenba, Broli, Ozotto, Ginyu, Bardock, Paragus, King Cold, Bardock’s original television special crew, Onio with his wife, Shiirasu, Great Saiyaman, Nail, Toninjinka, Zarbon, Pui-Pui, Slug, Vermoud, Tapikar, Thouser, and Bonyu. For his February 2020 entry, Toyotarō has contributed a new image of Man-Wolf:

Man-Wolf

In Kakarot, we learn there is a drug called Animaline, which lets people turn into animals, but I wonder if this guy is just able by nature to turn into a human when he sees a full moon…

Man-Wolf, in a reversed position with the “wolf” persona in front, was a previous entry in this series back in 2018. Toyotarō’s latest entry here flips that position, and references the “Animaline” (“Animorphaline” in the English localization) side-story in this year’s Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot video game, new information/lore contributed by original author Akira Toriyama himself (per this month’s April 2020 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine).

This drawing and comment set has been added to the respective page in our “Translations” archive.

Published by VegettoEX
20 February 2020, 2:28 PM ESTComments Off

Shueisha has listed an 03 April 2020 release date for the twelfth collected volume of Toyotarō’s Dragon Ball Super manga series, which will retail for ¥440 (+ tax) in print. The volume will pick up with the fifty-third chapter of the series; the eleventh collected volume saw its release in Japan back in December spanning chapters 49-52.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ fifty-seventh chapter coming today in the magazine’s April 2020 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, entering its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” arc. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. The eighth collected volume is due from Viz this March.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set last month.

Published by VegettoEX
20 February 2020, 10:07 AM ESTComments Off

Continuing onward from previous chapters, Shueisha and Viz have added the official English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s fifty-seventh chapter to their respective Manga Plus and Shonen Jump services, moving further into the original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner arc”. Alongside other initiatives including free chapters and a larger archive for paid subscribers, this release continues the companies’ schedule of not simply simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut to the release date, but to its local time in Japan in today’s April 2020 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine in Japan.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ fifty-seventh chapter coming today in the magazine’s April 2020 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, entering its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” arc. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. The eighth collected volume is due from Viz this March.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set last month.

Published by VegettoEX
09 February 2020, 4:07 PM ESTComments Off

Following a tease in last month’s March 2019 issue of V-Jump announcing the “Ultra Instinct” version of Son Goku, Bandai Namco formally unveiled a forthcoming third season of updates coming to Dragon Ball FighterZ in conjunction with the “Red Bull Dragon Ball FighterZ World Finals” event this weekend in France.

Various updates include:

  • A third “FighterZ Pass” comprised of five characters, including Kafla (available February 28th) and Son Goku (Ultra Instinct) (available this spring)
  • A new “Z Assist Select”, allowing players to select from different moves when an assist character is called in
  • Additional updates aiming to improve matches, particularly when one player has a single character left

Congratulations to Goichi “GO1” Kishida on his latest win at the World Finals!

The 3-on-3, “2.5D” fighting game is developed by Arc System Works and is currently available on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC (via Steam). A first “FighterZ Pass” with eight additional playable characters is available for $29.99, with a “FighterZ Pass 2” available for $24.99 adding another six. Said additional paid characters are also all available piecemeal at $4.99 each.

Dragon Ball FighterZ was originally released 26 January 2018 in North America and Europe, and 01 February 2018 in Japan, across the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Alongside its Japanese release, Bandai Namco announced that they had shipped two million copies of the game, making it the fastest-shipping game in the franchise’s history. The game also shipped on the Nintendo Switch back in September 2018.

Published by VegettoEX
08 February 2020, 10:29 AM ESTComments Off

Bandai Namco Holdings has posted a ¥52.904 billion (approximately $482 million) profit for the first three quarters of fiscal year 2020, compared to a ¥53.501 billion profit the same time period last year.

namco_bandai_logo_resaved

Dragon Ball once again handily came in as the company’s best-performing franchise for the first three quarters, pulling in ¥87.9 billion (a dip from last year’s ¥90.8 billion in the same time period); Dragon Ball beat out the number-two franchise, Mobile Suit Gundam, by about ¥25 billion. The company is slightly upping its projection from ¥115 billion to ¥122.5 for full fiscal year 2020, which would still be slightly down from last year’s ¥129 billion.

In terms of general toys and hobby merchandise (non-video games), the franchise also jumped from ¥15.5 billion for the first three quarters of fiscal 2019 to ¥17.2 billion this year’s time period, also slightly upping their projection for the full year from ¥20 to ¥21 billion.

Published by VegettoEX
21 January 2020, 8:24 AM ESTComments Off

Each month, Toyotarō provides a drawing — as well as a brief comment — on the official Japanese Dragon Ball website. Thus far, Toyotarō has provided drawings of #8, Lunch, Chapa with Oob, Tambourine, Man-Wolf, Tapion, Janenba, Broli, Ozotto, Ginyu, Bardock, Paragus, King Cold, Bardock’s original television special crew, Onio with his wife, Shiirasu, Great Saiyaman, Nail, Toninjinka, Zarbon, Pui-Pui, Slug, Vermoud, Tapikar, and Thouser. For his January 2020 entry, Toyotarō has contributed a sketch of Bonyu:

Bonyu.

She’s a character who appears in the game “Kakarot”, which is out now.

It seems she can use a Crusher Ball just like Jheece, who belongs to the same race!

Bonyu is a new character designed by Akira Toriyama for the video game Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot, which launched worldwide this past week. The character, who is said to have once been a part of the Ginyu Special-Squad, appears as part of a specific sub-quest a bit into the game.

This drawing and comment set has been added to the respective page in our “Translations” archive.

Published by VegettoEX
20 January 2020, 12:48 PM ESTComments Off

Continuing onward from previous chapters, Shueisha and Viz have added the official English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s fifty-sixth chapter to their respective Manga Plus and Shonen Jump services, moving further into the original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner arc”. Alongside other initiatives including free chapters and a larger archive for paid subscribers, this release continues the companies’ schedule of not simply simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut to the release date, but to its local time in Japan in today’s March 2020 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine in Japan.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ fifty-sixth chapter coming today in the magazine’s March 2020 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, entering its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” arc. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. The eighth collected volume is due from Viz this March.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set this month.

Published by Hujio
30 December 2019, 2:35 PM EST2 Comments

One staple of Kanzenshuu has always been our authoritatively detailed guides, many of which cover the various animation aspects of the Dragon Ball franchise. When we were first piecing together the “Episode Guide” nearly 15 years ago, the inclusion of complete episode credit listings was a priority, and as time went on we began compiling them in our “Production Guide”. This system worked for quite some time; however, the advent of the Dragon Ball Super TV series quickly made it apparent that this system was not only hard to maintain and organize, but difficult to navigate and search for specific information.

So in 2016 we went back to the drawing board and began working on a new guide, with the main emphasis on functionality. We wanted to create a guide that would be easy to navigate, search, and update, as well as provide easily shareable links to specific animators or pages. In fact, some of the functionality developed for this guide has already been incorporated into other areas of the site, namely the “Translations” archive. At the same time we also wanted to combine most of the site’s animation production related guides, sections, and pages under one roof. Thus, the “Animation Styles Guide” and “Production Guide” have both been removed from the site and incorporated into the new guide. And so, without further ado, I am super excited to unveil my labor of love, the “Animation Production Guide“!

The guide is divided up between general production information and our new Animation Staff Database, which serves as the backbone to the entire guide. This database provides listings of individual episode credits and the main animation staff involved with the Dragon Ball franchise, including a searchable list of all individual staff members stored in the database. In addition, the new Animation Supervisor Catalog provides a more detailed listing and discussion of the various animation studios and supervisors involved with the franchise.

While the guide as it sits now is up-to-date with the most current information, we do want to stress that this is a living guide that will continue to be updated as new information becomes available. It is also a massive guide that is far from being complete with everything we want to include, so bear with us as we continue to add more material. In the meantime, the guide has been added to the main navigation and is live for your viewing pleasure! Also, huge thanks to Ajay for his recommendations, review, and insights!

Published by VegettoEX
20 December 2019, 10:05 AM ESTComments Off

Continuing onward from previous chapters, Shueisha and Viz have added the official English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s fifty-fifth chapter to their respective Manga Plus and Shonen Jump services, moving further into the original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner arc”. Alongside other initiatives including free chapters and a larger archive for paid subscribers, this release continues the companies’ schedule of not simply simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut to the release date, but to its local time in Japan in today’s February 2020 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine in Japan.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ fifty-fifth chapter coming today in the magazine’s February 2020 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, entering its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” arc. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. The seventh collected volume is due from Viz this December.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having just wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set in January 2020.

Published by VegettoEX
20 December 2019, 6:49 AM EST1 Comment

Each month, Toyotarō provides a drawing — as well as a brief comment — on the official Japanese Dragon Ball website. Thus far, Toyotarō has provided drawings of #8, Lunch, Chapa with Oob, Tambourine, Man-Wolf, Tapion, Janenba, Broli, Ozotto, Ginyu, Bardock, Paragus, King Cold, Bardock’s original television special crew, Onio with his wife, Shiirasu, Great Saiyaman, Nail, Toninjinka, Zarbon, Pui-Pui, Slug, Vermoud, and Tapikar. For his December 2019 entry, Toyotarō has contributed a sketch of Thouser:

Thouser.

He’s the leader of the Coola Armored Squadron.

Apparently he’s from the same solar system as Jheese from the Ginyu Special Force!

I hear that Bonyu, who appears in the game Kakarot coming out this January, is also from Jheese’s system, which gets you wondering what kind of relationship the three of them might have had!

Thouser originally appeared as one of Coola’s henchmen in the fifth theatrical Dragon Ball Z film from 1991, performed by Shō Hayami (also having played Zarbon in the television series). With the shift to Hiroaki Miura for Zarbon since Dragon Ball Kai, Thouser remains Hayami’s sole (very occasional) Dragon Ball voice role. Thouser has appeared as a playable character in various video games over the years, including Dragon Ball Z: Sparking! NEO and Dragon Ball: Raging Blast 2.

The tidbit of Thouser hailing from the same solar system as Jheese comes from the special “Attention!! A Super Announcement of 3 Great Jump Anime!!” column in the 1991 No. 25 issue of Weekly Shōnen Jump, released that May, promoting upcoming films. The fifth Dragon Ball Z theatrical film screened alongside two other movies from the Magical Taluluto and Dragon Quest series that July.

This drawing and comment set has been added to the respective page in our “Translations” archive.