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Published by VegettoEX
14 February 2019, 3:49 PM EDT3 Comments

Today’s February 2019 issue of License Global‘s magazine features an extensive spotlight on the Dragon Ball franchise, which includes closer looks at partnerships between Toei Animation, Bandai Namco, and FUNimation, and some of the various companies’ upcoming plans.

Of particular note, the spotlight appears to reveal a forthcoming announcement of a new home video release as well as a North American symphony tour:

“In February, along with Funimation, we’re going to have a 30th anniversary collectible home video release announcement,” says [senior manager of licensing and marketing at Toei Animation, Lisa] Yamatoya. “This summer, we will partner with Overlook to host a ‘Dragon Ball Z’ symphony concert in the U.S. and Canada. The audience can listen to the symphony while clips from the show play, allowing fans to see the story on-screen with live music.”

The article also confirms the Dragon Ball franchise’s return to San Diego Comic Con (as well as tours following at Anime Expo, Crunchyroll Expo, and New York Comic Con), in addition to another appearance in Macy’s annual Thanksgiving Day parade.

The “Dragon Ball Symphonic Adventure” event produced by Overlook Events has been held in France, Spain, and Switzerland, featuring live performances of Shunsuke Kikuchi’s original musical score along with guest vocal performances.

Thanks to TheRed259 on our forum for the heads-up!

Published by VegettoEX
13 February 2019, 9:13 PM EDTComments Off

Two new interviews have been added to our “Translations” archive: those with Dragon Ball Super: Broly director Tatsuya Nagamine and animation supervisor Naohiro Shintani, both coming from the “Super Edition” of the film’s Japanese theatrical attendee program book.

Tatsuya Nagamine
Regarding the direction of the film, Nagamine discusses letting the animators go loose, working with the character of Broli (who had previously been handled by his mentor Shigeyasu Yamauchi), and the process of (not!) consulting with Toriyama himself:

The only time I spoke with [Toriyama] directly was at the film’s screening number zero (an initial private screening for staff members), so I actually didn’t consult with him at all before starting production on it. So I took his script itself as his message saying, “just do it right.” When I was in charge of the Dr. Slump: Dr. Mashirito and Abale-chan film, I created an animated version that didn’t leave out even a single panel of his original work, and it was my personal mission to use that same method this time around, trying not to change lines or add things if possible. However, realistically speaking, I had to make everything fit into a 100 minute timeframe, so… there were lines like, “Yes, Lord Freeza” where I would cut off the “Yes” and leave it as just “Lord Freeza” (laughs), and I shaved off small bits here and there. It couldn’t be too jam-packed though; it needed room to breathe, and I took care to make sure the overall mood of his script remained, along with leaving his nuances and Toriyama-isms intact as much as possible. That was what I felt was the best way to handle his screenplay, and I went about creating the film with that in mind.

Naohiro Shintani
Regarding the designs for and animation in the film, Shintani discusses being selected to work on the film, the particularities he paid attention to, and receiving corrections from Toriyama on the designs for Broli and other characters:

For Cheelye and Lemo, I basically drew them to be as faithful to Toriyama’s designs as possible. Broli was a different story, though. The only designs I received were up to him wearing his armor, and it gave off a very different impression than the Broli of the past. Personally, I had a very strong image of Broli based on the previous movies, so I created my own design for him at Full Power from scratch. I just had the urge to see him lose his shirt and run wild at the end. Toriyama had stated that he didn’t want him to be overly macho, so I aimed to make him look as huge as possible, yet still within the confines of not going overboard with it.

Both interviews have been archived in our “Translations” section.

Published by VegettoEX
11 February 2019, 7:18 PM EDTComments Off

SHOW DESCRIPTION:

Episode #0466! Mike and Julian catch up on listener questions, and end up doing a mini manga historical lesson in the process, discussing all of the various releases in Japan and some of the changes made to each along the way. Tune in for an update on our family name guide and a wealth of other great questions!

SEGMENTS:

  • 00:13 – Introduction
  • 02:38 – Site Teases (Wiki, Family Name Guide, etc.)
  • 09:27 – Listener Questions
  • 50:43 – Wrap-up

Our podcast is available via iTunes and/or Google Play Music, or you can pop the direct RSS feed into the program of your choice. You can also listen to this episode by directly downloading the MP3 or by streaming it on SoundCloud or YouTube. We invite you to discuss this episode on our forum.

Published by VegettoEX
07 February 2019, 3:09 PM EDTComments Off

The official Super Dragon Ball Heroes website has updated with a 24 February 2019 release date for the upcoming eighth episode of the series (“The Ultimate, Worst Warriors Invade! Universe 6 Demolished!”), continuing the brand-new “Universal Survival” arc:

The episode will debut in conjunction with the scheduled Super Dragon Ball Heroes “King Match” game event.

The self-described “promotional anime” began its free online streaming in July 2018, with the initial six episodes covering the “Prison Planet” arc, then moving on to the “Universal Survival” arc. Though the series’ original trailer was available worldwide, the subsequent episode postings themselves have been region-locked to Japan. No home release of the promotional anime has been announced.

Super Dragon Ball Heroes is itself an update and hardware revision to the original Dragon Ball Heroes, a card-based arcade game in which players arrange teammates on a playing field for turn-based battles. Dragon Ball Heroes has seen a variety of multimedia spin-offs and support pieces. Yoshitaka Nagayama’s Super Dragon Ball Heroes: Universe Mission manga (a follow-up to the previous Dark Demon Realm Mission series) currently runs in Shueisha’s bimonthly Saikyō Jump magazine, while Toyotarō’s Dragon Ball Heroes: Victory Mission ran from 2012-2015 in Shueisha’s monthly V-Jump magazine. Three portable game adaptations — Dragon Ball Heroes: Ultimate Mission, Ultimate Mission 2, and Ultimate Mission X — were released on the Nintendo 3DS. A fourth home version, Super Dragon Ball Heroes: World Mission, is due on the Nintendo Switch on 04 April 2019 and internationally 05 April 2019.

Published by VegettoEX
01 February 2019, 8:15 PM EDTComments Off

This week’s release of Videl brings the first true alternate costume to a character in Dragon Ball FighterZ. By holding the L1 (PlayStation 4) / LT (Xbox One) button and pressing the confirmation button, players can switch Videl from her short haircut fighting outfit to her longer-hair school outfit.

The outfit remains throughout all gameplay, including introductory sequences, battles, and post-battle win screens, and can receive “battle damage” as with the standard outfit. Both outfits also receive selectable, alternate color schemes.

The 3-on-3, “2.5D” fighting game is developed by Arc System Works and is currently available on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC (via Steam), and Nintendo Switch. Playable characters include Son Goku, Son Gohan (Cell arc design), Vegeta, Freeza, Cell, Boo (Good), Trunks, Piccolo, Kuririn, #16, #18 (with #17), Yamcha, Tenshinhan (with Chiaotzu), Ginyu (with teammates), Nappa (with Saibaimen), Gotenks, Son Gohan (Boo arc design), Boo (Pure), Hit, Beerus, and Goku Black (with Zamasu), as well as “Super Saiyan God Super Saiyan” (SSGSS, or “Super Saiyan Blue”) versions of Goku and Vegeta that can be accessed early via pre-orders or unlocked through gameplay. The Akira Toriyama-designed “#21” is a new character central to the game’s story mode.

The game’s first (optional) $34.99 “FighterZ Pass” covers eight total additional playable characters (also available individually at $5 each); these include Broli, Bardock, Vegetto, Merged Zamasu, (non-Super Saiyan, “black hair”) Son Goku, and (non-Super Saiyan, “black hair”) Vegeta, Coola, and No. 17.

The game’s recently-revealed “FighterZ Pass 2” debuts with Jiren and Videl this week, with the recent theatrical versions of Broli and Gogeta coming at a later point in time, along with other, unspecified characters.

Dragon Ball FighterZ was originally released 26 January 2018 in North America and Europe, and 01 February 2018 in Japan, with the Switch release coming later in September. Alongside its Japanese release, Bandai Namco announced that they had shipped two million copies of the game, making it the fastest-shipping game in the franchise’s history.

Published by VegettoEX
30 January 2019, 4:29 PM EDTComments Off

Bandai Namco has released patch notes for the latest update to Dragon Ball FighterZ:

HEALTH RECOVERY UPON TAKING DAMAGE:
– Reduce the amount of recoverable health when damaged. (Excluding invincible moves)

KI GAUGE:
– Decrease the amount of Ki Gauge gained when receiving damage from Super Attacks and Meteor Attacks, and increase the amount of Ki Gauge gained when receiving damage from other attacks.
– For a short period of time after using the Ki Gauge, the overall amount of Ki Gauge gained is now reduced.

MID-AIR SMASH ATTACK:
– When the condition for a camera change is met, the camera effect will occur regardless of the height of the character’s position now.

INVINCIBLE SPECIAL MOVES:
– Z Assist and Ultimate Z Change will now be unusable during Invincible Special Moves aside from when it hits.

POWERED-UP SPECIAL MOVE:
– Reduce the amount of Recoverable Health when receiving damage from Power-up Special Moves. (Excluding invincible moves)

SUPER ATTACK:
– Reduce the amount of damage dealt when a move other than Ultimate Z Change connects after a Super Attack hits.
– It is now easier to successfully connect Ultimate Z Change after Super Attacks.

ALL METEOR ATTACKS:
– Increased the minimum damage of all Meteor Attacks.

SPARKING!:
– Sparking! can now be used while blocking. (Includes blocking in mid-air)
– While Sparking! is active, reduce the amount of recoverable health of the opponent when damage is dealt to them. (Excluding invincible moves)
– Increased the start up frames of Sparking! aside from when cancelled from an attack.

VANISH MOVE:
– Camera change is easier to occur when cancelled from an attack.

Z-REFLECT:
– You will be invincible to the opponent’s Sparking! activation after a successful Z-Reflect against an opponent’s attack.

ALL THROW MOVES, DRAGON RUSH:
– Specific throw moves and Dragon Rush cannot connect more than once within a combo.

DRAGON RUSH:
– Decreased the amount of Ki gauge gained and damage dealt.
– After a Dragon Rush during mid-combo, camera change will not occur for subsequent hits.

MID-AIR DRAGON RUSH:
– The opponent will ground slide after a mid-air Dragon Rush during a combo.

GUARD CANCEL CHANGE:
– Invincible state will now last until coming into contact or in close vicinity with the opponent.
– Increased the recovery frames and landing recovery frames when blocked.

GROUND BACKSTEP:
– Increase the distance travelled.

SHENRON (REVIVE ALLIES):
– Increased the health of the revived ally.

SHENRON (MAKE ME IMMORTAL):
– Increased the health recovery rate.

GROUND RECOVERY:
– Reduced the collision from mid-air opponent.

DELAYED GROUND RECOVERY:
– Until completely down, you will now be able to perform the different ground recovery options.

DRAMATIC FINISH:
– Vanish Move will also trigger Dramatic Finish now.

The 3-on-3, “2.5D” fighting game is developed by Arc System Works and is currently available on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC (via Steam), and Nintendo Switch. Playable characters include Son Goku, Son Gohan (Cell arc design), Vegeta, Freeza, Cell, Boo (Good), Trunks, Piccolo, Kuririn, #16, #18 (with #17), Yamcha, Tenshinhan (with Chiaotzu), Ginyu (with teammates), Nappa (with Saibaimen), Gotenks, Son Gohan (Boo arc design), Boo (Pure), Hit, Beerus, and Goku Black (with Zamasu), as well as “Super Saiyan God Super Saiyan” (SSGSS, or “Super Saiyan Blue”) versions of Goku and Vegeta that can be accessed early via pre-orders or unlocked through gameplay. The Akira Toriyama-designed “#21” is a new character central to the game’s story mode.

The game’s first (optional) $34.99 “FighterZ Pass” covers eight total additional playable characters (also available individually at $5 each); these include Broli, Bardock, Vegetto, Merged Zamasu, (non-Super Saiyan, “black hair”) Son Goku, and (non-Super Saiyan, “black hair”) Vegeta, Coola, and No. 17.

The game’s recently-revealed “FighterZ Pass 2” is set to include Jiren and Videl this week, with the recent theatrical versions of Broli and Gogeta coming at a later point in time, along with other, unspecified characters.

Dragon Ball FighterZ was originally released 26 January 2018 in North America and Europe, and 01 February 2018 in Japan, with the Switch release coming later in September. Alongside its Japanese release, Bandai Namco announced that they had shipped two million copies of the game, making it the fastest-shipping game in the franchise’s history.

Published by VegettoEX
30 January 2019, 4:11 PM EDTComments Off

Following the appearance of recent online retailer listings, a new banner across the pre-order page of FUNimation’s online store lists a 16 April 2019 release date for the home video (DVD, Blu-ray, and digital) version of the recent Dragon Ball Super: Broly theatrical film. The film is still screening in theaters internationally, and no Japanese home video release has been announced as of yet.

Ignoring special preview screenings in both the east and west for all of the films, the following overview provides a complete list of theatrical screening and home video release dates for the three major films released since 2013; assuming the April release date for Broly holds true, this would mark the fastest turnaround from a film’s original Japanese theatrical debut to its American home video release:

Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods

  • Japanese (Toei) Theatrical Debut: 30 March 2013
  • Japanese (Toei) Home Video Release: 13 September 2013
  • American (FUNimation) Theatrical Debut: 05 August 2014
  • American (FUNimation) Home Video Release: 07 October 2014

Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection ‘F’

  • Japanese (Toei) Theatrical Debut: 18 April 2015
  • American (FUNimation) Theatrical Debut: 04 August 2015
  • Japanese (Toei) Home Video Release: 07 October 2015
  • American (FUNimation) Home Video Release: 20 October 2015

Dragon Ball Super: Broly

  • Japanese (Toei) Theatrical Debut: 14 December 2018
  • American (FUNimation) Theatrical Debut: 16 January 2019
  • Japanese (Toei) Home Video Release: unknown
  • American (FUNimation) Home Video Release: 16 April 2019
Published by VegettoEX
28 January 2019, 11:05 AM EDTComments Off

In conjunction with this weekend’s Dragon Ball FighterZ “World Tour Finals: Red Bull Final Summoning” tournament in Los Angeles, and following a brief accidental video post, Bandai Namco formally announced the forthcoming second season of paid downloadable content coming in the form of additional characters.

Videl and Jiren join the cast 31 January 2019, with the latest versions of Broli and Gogeta from the current Dragon Ball Super theatrical film also coming at a later date. The promotional video implies at least two more characters have yet to be revealed.

Jiren has been teased over the last few weeks alongside the forthcoming “Game Project Z” as well as in last week’s March 2018 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine in Japan:

Similar to Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2‘s update last month, Dragon Ball FighterZ is set to include the new version of Broli alongside the original version, who was introduced in the initial season pass last year.

The 3-on-3, “2.5D” fighting game is developed by Arc System Works and is currently available on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC (via Steam), and Nintendo Switch. Playable characters include Son Goku, Son Gohan (Cell arc design), Vegeta, Freeza, Cell, Boo (Good), Trunks, Piccolo, Kuririn, #16, #18 (with #17), Yamcha, Tenshinhan (with Chiaotzu), Ginyu (with teammates), Nappa (with Saibaimen), Gotenks, Son Gohan (Boo arc design), Boo (Pure), Hit, Beerus, and Goku Black (with Zamasu), as well as “Super Saiyan God Super Saiyan” (SSGSS, or “Super Saiyan Blue”) versions of Goku and Vegeta that can be accessed early via pre-orders or unlocked through gameplay. The Akira Toriyama-designed “#21” is a new character central to the game’s story mode.

The game’s first (optional) $34.99 “FighterZ Pass” covers eight total additional playable characters (also available individually at $5 each); these include Broli, Bardock, Vegetto, Merged Zamasu, (non-Super Saiyan, “black hair”) Son Goku, and (non-Super Saiyan, “black hair”) Vegeta, Coola, and No. 17.

Dragon Ball FighterZ was originally released 26 January 2018 in North America and Europe, and 01 February 2018 in Japan, with the Switch release coming later in September. Alongside its Japanese release, Bandai Namco announced that they had shipped two million copies of the game, making it the fastest-shipping game in the franchise’s history.

Published by VegettoEX
25 January 2019, 10:12 AM EDT1 Comment

Toei Animation has acknowledged certain instances of visual censorship in their recent remastered Blu-ray release of Dragon Ball Z‘s 11th and 12th theatrical films from 1994 and 1995, respectively. The acknowledgement comes by way of an apology for the packaging’s descriptive text:

<映像表現上の修正の内容>
本件商品の発売にあたり、皆様により楽しんでいただけるように、また、子どもへ与える影響にも配慮したうえで、映像の確認作業を行いました。映像確認作業の結果、表現上の修正を行った映像を本件商品に収録いたしました。

<ジャケットの記載>
本件商品のジャケットに「この作品には、映像、台詞の一部に、現在では不適当と思われる表現もありますが、作品の歴史的価値を重視し、現存する原版のとおり収録してあります。」という注意文を掲載していました。


-Content of Visual Edits-
Approaching the release of the products in question, so that they could be enjoyed by everyone even more thoroughly, as well as out of consideration for their influence upon children, a review of visual content was conducted. As a result of this review, versions of the films which contained edited expressions were included in the final products.

-Jacket Description-
Jackets of the products in question were printed with the following warning: “Certain parts of images and dialogue may contain material considered inappropriate for modern audiences. However, out of respect for historical value of the works, their original editions are maintained.”

Those wishing to seek a refund are able to fill out the respective form on Toei’s website through January 2020. New jackets with an “accurate” description may also be requested, and new versions printed from today moving forward will have the adjusted text. No mention is made of replacing discs with unaltered content or future re-releases.

In effect, Toei has apologized for the misleading statement on the packaging, rather than the new, otherwise-unannounced censorship in the product itself. These particular scenes remain untouched in the versions currently available for streaming on Amazon Prime and Netflix in Japan, which launched ahead of the Blu-ray release. Additional still-formally-unannounced changes have also been made to certain films, such as digital paint jobs correcting previously-unfinished animation.

Back in November, Toei apologized for an instance of flipped artwork on the back of the third volume’s cover art, offering replacements to consumers.

Three volumes covering the first six Dragon Ball Z films were released in November, followed by three volumes covering the next six Dragon Ball Z films in December, with a final two volumes released earlier this month rounding out the company’s new remastering of the original 17 theatrical films produced during the series’ original serialization.

While no international release of the films’ new remastering has been announced, Toei’s recent limited theatrical run of previous features in America was clearly based on this new print.

The films last saw a home video release in Japan within 2006’s remastered “Dragon Box: The Movies” DVD box set which was subsequently broken out as individual DVD releases over the course of 2008-2009.

Thanks to friends of the site kei17 for the above Piccolo comparison images and Cipher for translations.

Published by VegettoEX
23 January 2019, 10:51 AM EDT4 Comments

A spotlight on various Toei properties by WorldScreen.com appears to reveal and confirm additional episodes of the Dragon Ball Super television series from Toei Animation:

The company is also making more episodes of Dragon Ball Super, a Japanese fantasy martial arts action series in the Dragon Ball media franchise that follows Goku in the aftermath of Majin Buu’s defeat and as God of Destruction Beerus awakens.

The spotlight comes during this week’s National Association of Television Program Executives’ event in Miami. WorldScreen.com has previously reported on various international licensing agreements for the Dragon Ball franchise, such as extensive Latin American deals.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub airing on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its seventh box set this coming April.

Special thanks to @Mendinso on Twitter and everyone else who brought this to our attention.

UPDATE 1: Anime News Network received a curiously-phrased denial from Toei Animation regarding the statement of “more episodes”-

International media news website World Screen posted a spotlight on Toei Animation on Monday and said that the company is “making more episodes of Dragon Ball Super.” However, Toei Animation denied having “mentioned or announced” more episodes of Dragon Ball Super, and told ANN that the report “is not true at this moment.”

UPDATE 2: A “correction” posted to WorldScreen.com this evening states-

Correction: The previously written article contained inaccurate information regarding the production of new Dragon Ball Super episodes. Toei Animation does not plan on producing new television episodes at this time.