Name Pun Round-up

Discussion regarding the entirety of the franchise in a general (meta) sense, including such aspects as: production, trends, merchandise, fan culture, and more.

Moderators: Kanzenshuu Staff, General Help

User avatar
Herms
Kanzenshuu Co-Owner & Administrator
Posts: 10527
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 6:40 pm
Location: Jupiter
Contact:

Name Pun Round-up

Postby Herms » Fri Mar 12, 2010 4:22 am

----Notice:This old thread is part of my series of guides. To avoid necro-posting, please post any comments you have in the sticky thread for my guides, rather than here. Thanks!----

In response to the thread in the questions forum on name puns, I’ve decided to start a thread compiling every known name pun. This is draft one. It’s not proofread at all, isn’t very well organized, and of course isn’t perfectly complete. So I want people to point out who/what is missing or needs expansion/correction. And then eventually the finished version will become a page on Kanzentai or something.

Entries is this guide are generally set up like this:
Character Name:
Pun explanation and whatnot. If there’s a quote from Toriyama or a guidebook that leaves nothing more to add, I’ll quote that and not bother with this. [guide source, if any, are written in brackets]
Toriyama/Daizenshuu explanation: “Quotes from Toriyama or the daizenshuu on the source of the name.”
Source Spelling: The name’s source in Japanese (kanji or katakana or whatever) and Romanized.
Name Spelling: The actual character name in Japanese and Romanized. This way you can directly see what sort of alternations where made to the source to create the name. For names taken directly from the source without any changes (like Piccolo), I’ll just write “sama”.

Sources for Toriyama and daizenshuu name pun confirmation are like this:

[D6]: Daizenshuu 6
[D10]: Daizenshuu 10
[DBF]: DragonBall Forever
[SEG]: Super Exciting Guide: Character Volume
[GTPF]: DragonBall GT Perfect Files Vol.1

Sometimes I’ll cite a guidebook without actually quoting from it, if it’s not really worth giving a full quote.

Well, I think that’s more or less everything. I’m kinda tired, so if I did something stupid I’ll fix it tomorrow.

Goku and Family

Son Goku
The name of the monkey king from the Chinese fantasy novel Journey to the West, which DragonBall is based on to a certain extent. “Son Gokuu” is the Japanese reading of the character’s name, while the Chinese reading is “Sūn Wùkōng”. The 悟/go means roughly to understand or to percieve. More importantly, it's used to write the verb satoru (悟る), from which the name of the Buddhist concept of satori derives. 空 can mean sky, empty, or void. It's the kanji for sora, the Japanese word for sky, which you might be familiar with if you're a Kingdom Hearts fan. When it's read as kara, it means 'empty'. When you put these two characters together, you get the meaning of "Percieving the Void", "Aware of Vacuity", or various other translations. In the story of Journey to the West, the monkey king is given this name by a Buddhist sage who he studies under. For a family name, the sage gives him 孫/Son, meaning “grandchild”, because it’s written with the radical for “monkey”.
Toriyama Explanation: “This name was taken completely from that of the protagonist of Journey to the West. This was because I originally planned on him being an actual monkey.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: 孫悟空/Sūn Wùkōng (Chinese), Son Gokuu (Japanese)
Name Spelling: 孫悟空 /Son Gokuu

Son Goten
The joke behind Goten's name is that it replaces the character for 'sky' in Goku's name with the character for heaven (天). As Toriyama explains, the idea is that instead of merely perceiving the sky, Goten perceives the heavens.
Toriyama Explanation: “The characters have the meaning of ‘Understanding the Heavens’, which is on an even bigger scale than ‘Goku’ [‘Understanding the Sky’ and various other interpretations].” [DBF]
Name Spelling: 孫悟天 /Son Goten

Son Gohan
Comes from御飯 (ご飯)/gohan, which literally means rice, but can also mean a meal in general (飯/han=rice while 御/go is simply an honorific prefix). In Gohan’s name, the go is written with 悟, the kanji meaning “to understand” which is used in Goku and Goten’s name, rather than 御, the kanji used for the food.
Toriyama Explanation: “He inherited this name from Goku’s dead grandfather.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ご飯/gohan
Name Spelling: 孫悟飯/Son Gohan

Pan
Pan is the Japanese word for bread, derived from the Portuguese “pão” (compare “pan” in Spanish and “pain” in French).
Toriyama Explanation: “Well, to put it simply, she’s the child of gohan, so how about bread?” [as noted above, gohan means ‘rice’ in Japanese. Here Toriyama uses the actual kanji for rice rather than the ones used to write Gohan’s name] [DBF]
Source Spelling:: パン/pan
Name Spelling: same

Chi-Chi
Taken from 乳/chichi is Japanese for “breast” or “milk”, fitting in with her father’s bovine theme.
Toriyama Explanation: “Since she’s the daughter of Gyuumao [the Ox Demon King], I chose chichi because it’s a cow-related name that was also girlish.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: 乳/chichi
Name Spelling: チチ/

Gyuumao
The name means “Ox Demon King”, and is the name of a demon from Journey to the West. The entire Mt. Frypan storyline from early in DB is adapted from the Fire Mountain episode in JttW, and Gyuumao was part of that.

Saiyan and Tsufruian Stuff
The name of the race itself comes from yasai, Japanese for “vegetable”.
Source Spelling: 野菜/yasai
Name Spelling: サイヤ人/Saiya-jin

Kakarot
A play on “carrot”. Perhaps Toriyama picked this vegetable for Goku’s Saiyan name because its orange color matches his orange Turtle School uniform?
Toriyama Explanation: “Saiyan is, of course, a pun on vegetable. Although they’re a fighting race, I decided on the ambience of reversing ‘vegetable’ [yasai in Japanese]. Because of this, the Saiyans all have names that are puns off of vegetable names. ‘Kakarot’ comes from ‘carrot’.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: キャロット/kyarotto
Name Spelling: カカロット/Kakarotto

Vegeta
Derived from “vegetables”. Because the Saiyans are all named for vegetables, its fitting that their planet and rulers would be named after the word “vegetable” itself.
Toriyama Explanation: “Since he’s the prince of the Saiyans, his name was taken directly from ‘vegetable’.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ベジタブル/bejitaburu
Name Spelling: ベジータ/Bejiita

Raditz
Toriyama Explanation: “From the vegetable ‘radish’.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ラディッシュ/radisshu
Name Spelling: ラディッツ/Radittsu

Nappa
Named for 菜っ葉/nappa, which refers to leafy vegetables. There appears to be no intended connection to the Chinese Napa cabbage, which is called taihakusai in Japanese.
Toriyama Explanation: “This might just be my dialect, but leafy vegetables like spinach are called ‘nappa’ , so I took it directly from that.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: 菜っ葉/nappa
Name Spelling: ナッパ/Nappa

Bardock
Named after burdock, particularly greater burdock (gobou, whose roots are used in meals in Japan. In the DB Forever name pun guide, Toriyama has trouble remembering if Bardock even appeared in the manga, but a note in parenthesis points out the pun.
Toriyama Explanation: “I don’t really remember this. Did he even appear in the original story [i.e. the manga]? If he was in the original story, then his name was definitely taken from a vegetable. (Bardock=greater burdock)” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: バーダック/Baadakku
Name Spelling: same

For Bardock's crew members, see the section on the Bardock special.

Great Saiyaman
Basically just a typical Super Sentai-type name. The jin in “Saiya-jin” is essentially just swapped out for the English word “man”.

Great Saiyaman No.2
Probably a reference to the anime Yatterman, where Yatterman’s girlfriend dresses up as “Yatterman No.2”. In anime, manga, and whatnot, the English word “man” is often used in characters’ names, but it’s use isn’t limited to men, as seen in names like “Devilman Lady” and

SaibaiMan
Named from the Japanese word saibai, meaning ‘cultivation’, making them the “Cultivation Men”. For some reason or another, Funi leaves the second “i” off of “Saibai” for their spelling of the name.
Source Spelling: 栽培/saibai
Name Spelling: 栽培マン/Saibaiman

Tsufruians
The race the Saiyans wiped out in order to take full control of Planet Vegeta. In contrast to the Saiyans, who are named for vegetables, they are named after “fruits”.
Source Spelling: フルーツ/furuutsu
Name Spelling: ツフル人/Tsufuru-jin

For Tullece, Broli, Paragus, or Tarble, see the sections on their respective movies.

For the Tsufruians Dr. Raichi and Hatchi-Hyack, see the section on "Plan to Exterminate the Saiyans".

Bulma’s Family

Bulma
Named after bloomers, a female garment which originally were like very baggy, full-length pants (sort of a cross between a dress and pants), but which in Japan came to refer to female gym shorts. They are named after 19th century women’s rights advocate Amelia Bloomer.
Toriyama Explanation: “Since she was a girl I didn’t want a cute name, but something that would be silly and that females would recognize. So I did this.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ブルマー/burumaa (also speltブルマ/buruma, ブルーマ/buruuma, or ブルーマー/buruumaa)
Name Spelling: ブルマ/Buruma

Dr. Brief
Bulma’s family has an underwear theme to their names, and so her father is named for the briefs, tight-fitting male underwear.
Toriyama Explanation: “Because it’s underwear-related”
Source Spelling:: ブリーフ/Buriifu
Name Spelling: same

Bulma’s mother
Bulma’s mother is actually never actually named during the series, but in the DB Forever name pun guide, Toriyama says that if he had bothered to name her, he would have used “Panchy”, a play on “panty”/”panties”.
Toriyama Explanation: “Now that you mention it, she didn’t have a name, did she? Supposing I did name her, I would have probably used ‘Panchy’. Not ‘Panty’.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: パンティー/pantii
Name Spelling: パンチー/Panchii

Trunks
Toriyama Explanation: “He’s part of Bulma’s family, so his name was taken from underwear, as well as from sports wear.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: トランクス/Torankusu
Name Spelling: same

Bra
Toriyama Explanation: “From the others you can see that Bulma’s family have underwear-related names, so obviously hers is from brassiere.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ブラ/Bura
Name Spelling: same

Friends & Allies

Kuririn
There are a few things going on with Kuririn’s name, though Toriyama doesn’t really explain any of it (see below). First, kuri-kuri bouzu means a clean-shaven head, which certainly fits him. Second, 栗/kuri is Japanese for “chestnut”, which besides tying back into his “smooth head” image, is carried over into the name of his daughter (and in the anime, his early girlfriend). One of the title pages also shows Kuririn riding an air bike with the栗/kuri kanji on the front. Finally, the “rin” on the end of his name may be a reference to the Shaolin monks (少林/Shourin in Japanese), a staple of martial arts films. “Shaolin” more or less translates to “little forest”, and the temple where Kuririn trained prior to become Kame-sennin’s pupil was called the Oorin Temple (多林寺/Oorin-ji), “big forest temple”, an obvious play on the name Shaolin. The Oorin uniform worn by Kuririn and his formal seniors at Oorin Temple are also clearly based on the Shaolin uniform.
Toriyama Explanation: “This is a name that I decided completely based on just the ambience from the character’s image. At that point, I didn’t think this was going to be a character that would continue to appear for a long time afterwards, so I used this half-baked naming.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: くりくり/kuri-kuri 栗/kuri, 少林/Shourin
Name Spelling: クリリン/Kuririn

Yamcha
Comes from Yum Cha, a form of Chinese dining consisting of drinking tea while eating dim sum.
Toriyama Explanation: “This was also taken from a form of Chinese cuisine. Originally the name was just ‘Yum Cha’ itself, but that didn’t go over too well [here Toriyama spells ‘Yamcha’ in kanji with a katakana reading, like the Japanese word for Yum Cha, instead of just in katakana like it’s written in the series]. ” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: 飲茶/yamucha
Name Spelling: ヤムチャ/Yamucha

Muten Roushi (Kame-sennin)
武/mu stands for all things martial, while 天/ten means “heaven” and 老師/roushi means an old master or teacher. For the name “Kame-sennin”, 亀/kame means “turtle”, while 仙人/sennin is a type of sage or saint in Japanese folklore. To quote the Encyclopedia Mythica: “The immortal spirit of a saint living in the mountains in Japanese mythology. This saint, a hermit, who has acquired so much merit by his asceticism that he can perform miracles, such as speaking after death, flying on the back of a tortoise or on a cloud, or causing a gourd to give birth to a horse. Sennins may speak to mortals in dreams or appear in the shape of ordinary men. They are accompanied by their familiars: a toad, a horse, or a tortoise.” The Japanese sennins are derived from the Xian of Chinese Daoism.
Toriyama Explanation: “There really isn’t any great reason; ‘Kame-sennin’ just didn’t seem like all that amazing a name for whatever reason, so I thought up a name that sounded suitably renowned and powerful.” [DBF]

Oolong
Named for Oolong tea.
Toriyama Explanation: “I thought of including Chinese tea, so for these two I used Oolong Tea and Pu’er Tea.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ウーロン茶 (烏龍茶)/Uuron-cha
Name Spelling: ウーロン/Uuron

Puar
Like Oolong, he’s named for a tea: Pu-erh tea.
Toriyama Explanation: “I thought of including Chinese tea, so for these two I used Oolong Tea and Pu-erh Tea.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: プーアル茶 (普洱茶)/Puuaru-cha
Name Spelling: プーアル/Puuaru

Yajirobe
A 弥次郎兵衛/yajirobee is a type of Japanese balancing toy.
Toriyama Explanation: “Since I imagined him as a Japanese person, I just used a Japanese-like name.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: 弥次郎兵衛 (やじろべえ)/yajirobee
Name Spelling: ヤジロベー/Yajirobee

Lunch
Most likely this comes from the English word “lunch”, the most important meal of the day (screw breakfast), considering the prominence of food puns throughout DB. However, there’s no official confirmation of this, and the same katakana can also be used for the English word “Launch” (hence the Funi spelling for this character).
Toriyama Explanation: “I can’t remember at all. It was probably just something or another.” [DBF]
(Probable) Source Spelling:: ランチ /Ranchi
Name Spelling: same

Marron
In keeping with her father’s chestnut theme, she is named after “marron’, French for chestnut.
Toriyama Explanation: “Because she’s Kuririn’s (栗/kuri) child, I just took her name straight from marron.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: マロン/maron
Name Spelling: マーロン/Maaron

Oob
Being the reincarnation of Boo (ブウ/Buu), his name is “Boo” written in reverse: Oob (ウーブ/Uubu). Goku even points this out in the series.
Toriyama Explanation: “It’s a name like if you took the original, Boo, and reversed it.”

Crane School

Tao Pai Pai
The kanji mean “Peach White White”, and it’s intended as a pseudo-Chinese name. Accordingly, it’s written in kanji (桃白白) with a katakana furigana reading (タオパイパイ), indicating that the kanji have a Chinese reading rather than a Japanese one (similar to Shenlong’s name or the names of the dragonballs). The proper way of rendering this Chinese reading in English would be "Tao Bai Bai".
Toriyama Explanation: “I wanted to use a name that would be a complete reversal of his image, a cute Chinese name, so I used this. I don’t even know if this name works as an actual Chinese name.” [DBF]
Name Spelling: 桃白白 (タオパイパイ)/Taopaipai

Tsuru-sennin
Means “crane sennin”; a sennin being a mythical holy sage (for more details, see Kame-sennin’s entry). Cranes and turtles are paired together in Japanese art, so it’s a fitting animal motif for the rival of Kame-sennin (the turtle sennin) to have.
Toriyama Explanation: “There’s no great reason. I thought ‘If not turtles, how about cranes’?” [DBF]
Name Spelling: 鶴仙人/Tsuru-sennin

Tenshinhan
Named for 天津飯/Tenshinhan (aka tenshindon), a quasi-Chinese dish actually invented in Japan, consisting of a crabmeat omelet over rice. It gets its name from the fact that it was originally made using high-quality rice (飯/han) from the Chinese city of Tianjin (天津; Tenshin is the Japanese reading of the city’s name). The character’s name is written in kanji (天津飯) with a katakana furigana reading (テンシンハン/Tenshinhan), but unlike the other pseudo-Chinese characters, this is actually the regular Japanese reading for the kanji, despite being written in katakana.
Toriyama Explanation: “Even though he’s a strong, cool guy, I used a well-known name from Chinese cuisine just to be silly. For me, I chose the basis for each name based mostly on silliness, which is why they usually end up being as stupid as this.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: 天津飯/tenshinhan
Name Spelling: 天津飯 (テンシンハン)/Tenshinhan

Chaozu
Taken from 餃子/jiǎozi (gyouza in Japanese), Chinese dumplings, aka pot stickers. “Chaozu” is a Japanese approximation of the Mandarin reading of the kanji. Like the other characters with Chinese (or pseudo-Chinese names), his name is written in kanji (餃子) with a katakana furigana reading (チャオズ/Chaozu) to indicate that it has a foreign reading.
Toriyama Explanation: “Of course, this was taken from the Chinese reading of gyoza” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: 餃子/gyouza; jiaozi
Name Spelling: 餃子(チャオズ)/Chaozu

Gods and co.

Shenlong
Written 神龍/Shenron, it means "Dragon God". "Shenlong" is a Chinese reading of the kanji. In Japanese normally they would be read as Shinryuu (like the Final Fantasy secret boss).

Karin-sama
Named for かりん糖/karintou, a deep-fried Japanese snack. “Tower” in Japanese is 塔/tou, and so the Karin Tower is カリン塔/Karin-tou, a homonym for the candy. Karin himself is then simply named after his tower.
Toriyama Explanation: “This was taken from the Karin Tower (from the karintou snack); since he’s the tower’s owner he’s named Karin. ” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: かりんとう (かりん糖; 花林糖)/karintou
Name Spelling: カリン/Karin
カリン塔/Karin-Tou

Kami (God)
Taken straight from 神/kami, Japanese for “god” or “spirit”. In this case, it refers specifically to the God of Earth (Chikyuu no Kami). It’s simply a title, not an actual character’s name, and over the course of the series both the child of Katattsu and Dende serve this role. However, since the child of Katattsu is too much of a twit to remember his own name, we’re left with little else to call him, so the term is much more closely associated with him (and of course, Dende doesn’t serve as god for nearly as long). He’s often referred to as神様/Kami-sama, sama being a Japanese honorific showing great respect, since generally people try to show respect to God. However, people who really hate him, like Piccolo or Garlic Jr., don’t do this.

Enma Daio
This is taken straight from the閻魔大王/Enma-Daiou, “Great King Enma”, the Japanese name for the Hindu and Buddhist deity Yama, judge of the dead. 大王/daiou means “great king”, while 閻魔/Enma is simply an attempt at picking kanji that phonetically approximate “Yama”; 閻/en means “mansion” and 魔/ma means “demon” or “magic”.

Kaio
Kaio's name is made up of 界/kai, 'world', and 王/ou, 'king', making him “King of the Worlds”. The mark he wears on his clothes and prints on Goku’s uniform is a combination of界 and 王.
Toriyama Explanation: “Because he’s the king of the worlds [sekai no ou]. ” [DBF]
Name Source: 世界の王/sekai no ou
Name Spelling: 界王/Kaiou

Kaioshin
As said above, “Kaio” means “King of the Worlds”. 神/shin means god, making Kaioshin essentially mean “God of the Kaios” or “God of the Kings of the Worlds”. As Piccolo says in the series, he’s effectively the god of the gods.
Name Spelling: 界王神/Kaioushin

Bubbles
Toriyama Explanation: “Michael Jackson’s pet chimpanzee was named Bubbles, so I used it to be silly.” [DBF]

Mister Popo
Toriyama Explanation: “I think I named him this simply because of the sound.” [DBF]
Name Spelling: ミスター・ポポ/Misutaa Popo

Kibito
Taken from tsukibito, Japanese for attendant, since he serves as Kaioshin’s attendant.
Toriyama Explanation: “Since he’s Shen’s attendant, I took his name from tsukibito ” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: 付き人/tsukibito
Name Spelling: キビト/Kibito

Mister Satan and co.

Mister Satan
His name is taken from “Satan”. To quote Asimov’s Guide to the Bible: “The Hebrew word satan means ‘adversary’; that is, one who opposes. It does not necessarily have to have a supernatural sense, and is occasionally used in the Bible to represent an ordinary human adversary. […] Sometime after the Babylonian captivity, however, the notion arose that there was a supernatural Adversary; a being whose official duty it was to work for man’s evil as God worked for man’s good.” And so gradually the term took on the meaning of demon king and whatnot it has today. As far as DB goes though, the name is just supposed to sound like a tough fighter’s name, and is just a stage name. As Toriyama has recently revealed in the Super Exciting Guides, Mister Satan’s real name is actually “Mark” (マーク/Maaku), a re-arrangement of悪魔/akuma, “devil”, in keeping with his satanic theme.
Toriyama Explanation:

[DBF]
“Since he’s a professional grappler, I used a name that would make him sound like one. Because this is his ring name, I think his actual name is probably something different.”

[SEG]
“’Mister Satan’ is a ring name, and his real name is different. Mister Satan’s real name is ‘Mark’. (this is a pun on akuma]) In the region where Satan lives, family names aren’t separated from given names, making his name only ‘Mark’. His daughter ‘Videl’ is not a ring name, but her real name. This is a pun on ‘devil’.”

(Mister Satan)
Source Spelling: サタン/Satan
Name Spelling: ミスター・サタン/Misutaa Satan

(Mark)
Source Spelling:: 悪魔/akuma
Name Spelling: マーク/Maaku

Videl
Following her father’s demonic theme, her name is an anagram of “devil”.
Toriyama Explanation: “Since she’s Satan’s daughter, to go along with that I wanted to give her a demonic name taken from ‘devil’ , but since ‘devil’ wasn’t very girlish I used ‘Videl’.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: デビル/Debiru
Name Spelling: ビーデル/Biideru

Bee
Buu’s dog. This is a joke derived from Japanese alphabetical order, which goes a-i-u-e-o for each starting sound (so a-i-u-e-o, followed by ka-ki-ku-ke-ko, sa-shi-su-se-so, etc). For each starting sound, “e” follows “u”, and so if you go over a row from ブウ/Buu you get ベエ/Bee. This name should be pronounced like the English word “bay” rather than like “bee” the insect, and so Viz spells it “Bay”. However, in this case the joke is entirely on how the name is spelt and the pronunciation is of secondary importance, so I think it should be kept as “Bee”. You don’t really need to know anything about Japanese to see a connection between “Buu/Boo” and “Bee”.
Toriyama Explanation: “It’s the name you get when you shift the letters for ‘Buu’ over one row.” [DBF]

Piza
Named after pizza.
Source Spelling:: ピザ/piza
Name Spelling: ピーザ/Piiza

Piroshiki
Named after pirozhki, Russian fried buns stuffed with things like meat or rice.
Source Spelling: ピロシキ/piroshiki
Name Spelling: same

Karoni
Named after macaroni.
Source Spelling:: マカロニ/makaroni
Name Spelling: カロニー/Karonii

All Things Namekian

Polunga
In-universe, this is supposed to mean “god of dreams” in the Namekian language. Out-universe…well, see below.
Toriyama Explanation: “I don’t remember this one either, but it was probably just a completely random name.” [DBF]
Name Spelling: ポルンガ/Porunga

Piccolo
Named after the piccolo, a small kind of flute (“piccolo” is Italian for “small”). In-universe, “piccolo” is supposed to mean “another world” in the Namekian language.
Toriyama Explanation: “I decided that to be silly I’d use a cute name for a scary guy. From that, Piccolo’s henchmen became a series of musical instruments.” [DBF]
Source Spelling: ピッコロ/Pikkoro
Name Spelling: same

Tambourine
Named for the tambourine, a percussion instrument.
Toriyama Explanation: “These [Piccolo’s henchmen] are all musical instruments.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: タンバリン/tanbarin
Name Spelling: same

Piano
Named for the piano. The instrument’s name actually comes from pianoforte, meaning soft and loud, since it can produce both kinds of notes (piano itself means soft). Maybe Piano was named this because he’s so weak compared to the other henchmen?
Toriyama Explanation: “These [Piccolo’s henchmen] are all musical instruments.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ピアノ/piano
Name Spelling: same

Cymbal
A percussion instrument.
Toriyama Explanation: “These [Piccolo’s henchmen] are all musical instruments.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: シンバル/shinbaru
Name Spelling: same

Drum
Another instrument. Drums are big and fat, kind of like him.
Toriyama Explanation: “These [Piccolo’s henchmen] are all musical instruments.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ドラム/doramu
Name Spelling: same

Planet Namek and Namekians
A play on the word namekuji, slug. 星/sei is Japanese for planet or star, and so a person from Planet Namek is called a Namekku-seijin.
Toriyama Explanation: “Since ‘Namekian’ itself is taken from namekuji because of the antennas they have on their heads, they all get their names from slugs and the similar snails.” [DBF]
Source Spelling: ナメクジ (蛞蝓)/namekuji
Name Spelling: ナメック星人/Namekku-seijin

Muuri
From the second half of katatsumuri, one of the Japanese words for snail.
Toriyama Explanation: “Since ‘Namekian’ itself is taken from namekuji [slug] because of the antennas they have on their heads, they all get their names from slugs and the similar snails. “Muuri” is from katatsumuri” [DBF]
Source Spelling: カタツムリ(蝸牛)/katatsumuri
[u]Name Spelling:
ムーリ/Muuri

Katattsu
Kami/Piccolo’s parent. Named for the first half of katatsumuri, one of the Japanese words for snail.
Source Spelling:: カタツムリ(蝸牛)/katatsumuri
Name Spelling: カタッツ/Katattsu

Kargo
Toriyama Explanation: “Obviously, this comes from the snail cuisine escargot.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: エスカルゴ/esukarugo
Name Spelling: カルゴ/Karugo

Dende
A play on denden-mushi, one of the Japanese words for snail.
Toriyama Explanation: “From denden-mushi” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: デンデンムシ (蝸牛)/denden-mushi
Name Spelling: デンデ/Dende

Tsuuno
From tsuno, Japanese for “antenna”. In Viz he’s named “Caracol”, Spanish for snail.
Toriyama Explanation: “From a snail’s antenna” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: 角/tsuno
Name Spelling: ツーノ/Tsuuno

Nail
Toriyama Explanation: “From the English name for snail.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: スネイル/suneiru
Name Spelling: ネイル/Neiru

Maima Region
Where Freeza’s ship lands on Namek. Comes from 舞舞/maimai, one of several Japanese words for snail. This place is called the Shell Region in Viz.

Pilaf and co.

Pilaf
Named for rice pilaf. His (self-appointed) title, 大王/daiou, means “great king’ and is used for such people as Alexander the Great and King Kamehameha I. Clearly he has an overrated opinion of himself.
Toriyama’s Ceaselessly Helpful Explanation: “It seems that I wanted to give them a food theme.” [DBF]
Name Spelling: ピラフ/Pirafu

Shuu (Soba), Mai
Named for shumai, Chinese dumplings served with dim sum. Shuu’s alternate name, Soba, comes from thin Japanese buckwheat noodles.
Toriyama Explanation: “Shuu and Mai make “shumai”. Soba was probably just a name that I thoughtlessly gave him when I thought I hadn’t already given him a name. Knowing that from beginning now, it looks pretty bad.” [DBF]
(Shuu and Mai)
Source Spelling:: 焼売(しゅうまい)/shuumai
Name Spelling: シュウ/Shuu and マイ/Mai
(Soba)
Source Spelling:: 蕎麦 (そば)/soba
Name Spelling: ソバ/Soba

Red Ribbon Army
All its members are named for colors, generally taken from the English words for them. I don’t think there’s any real meaning behind “red ribbon” itself, other than the alliteration.
Toriyama Explanation: “The military personnel of the Red Ribbon Army all have the names of colors, so it’s the same for this group. I more or less picked the color of each character’s image.” [DBF]

Commander Red
The army is named after him. Or perhaps he’s named for the army? He has red hair in the anime, while in the manga he has white hair and a red eye-patch.
Source Spelling: レッド/reddo
Name Spelling: same

Adjunct Black
Presumably named for his dark skin.
Source Spelling: ブラック/burakku
Name Spelling: same

Colonel Silver
Source Spelling: シルバー/shirubaa
Name Spelling: same

General White
The color white matches the snow setting of the Muscle Tower arc.
Source Spelling: ホワイト/howaito
Name Spelling: same

Sergeant Metallic
Named after the word for “metallic”, since he’s a robot made from metal and all. Actually, in DB Forever and the SEG, he's listed with the other color-based RR members, so apparently he was named this on the idea that "metallic" was a color.
Source Spelling: メタリック/Metarikku
Name Spelling: same

Sergeant Master Murasaki
Named for murasaki, Japanese for “purple”. He’s distinguished from the rest of the RR Army members by being named for a Japanese word for a color, rather than an English one.
Source Spelling: 紫/murasaki
Name Spelling: ムラサキ/Murasaki

Murasaki’s Brothers
Unnamed in the series, but in the Adventure Special and Daizenshuu 7 they’re given as Kon (Navy Blue), Cha (Brown), Aka (Red), Ao (Blue/Green). They follow Murasaki in being named for the Japanese words for colors, rather than English ones like the rest of the army.
Source Spelling: 紺, 茶, 赤, 青/kon, cha, aka, ao
Name Spelling: コン、チャ、アカ、アオ/Kon, Cha, Aka, Ao

General Blue
His name matches the water theme of his arc.
Source Spelling: ブルー/buruu
Name Spelling: same

Dock
The fat member of Blue’s corps, who leads the attack on Kame House. He’s only named in the anime. Apparently he’s named after “dock”, in keeping with the water setting of the Blue arc.
Source Spelling: ドック/dokku
Name Spelling: same

Yellow
Kind of matches the color of his tiger fur.
Source Spelling: イエロー/Ieroo
Name Spelling: same

Violet
Matches her hair color.
Source Spelling: バイオレット/baioretto
Name Spelling: same

Copper
Source Spelling: カッパー/kappaa
Name Spelling: same

Brown
Source Spelling: ブラウン/buraun
Name Spelling: same

Androids

Hatchan (Android No.8)
A play on hachi/”eight” and chan, a Japanese honorific that’s sort of a cutesy term of endearment.
Source Spelling: 八/hachi + ちゃん/chan
Name Spelling: ハッチャン/Hacchan

Cell
Named for the fact that he’s made up of the cells of the Earth’s greatest fighters, and he absorbs people, merging with that at a cellular level, and all that jazz.
Toriyama Explanation: “Since this character absorbed many humans and transformed, his name has the meaning of ‘cell’ in English.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: セル (CELL)/Seru
Name Spelling: same

Freeza and co.

Freeza
I’m going to quote two Toriyama explanations this time, since I think one kind of clarifies the other, and they help explain the underlying logic for name puns in general: as a way of making Toriyama’s job easier.
Toriyama Explanation:

[DBF]
“I took his name from ‘freezer’, since that went along with vegetables (Saiyans) and milk (Ginyu). Actually, it would have been more correct to use refrigerator, but that wouldn’t have gotten the joke across so I used freezer.”

[SEG]
“It’s a real pain to decide on the names for lots of characters. If you unify the names into a series, it makes it easy to think them up. For instance, there’s Freeza, who directed the Saiyans and the other evil aliens. Strictly speaking, a ‘freezer’ is a reitouko, but I named him with the image of a refrigerator [reizouko] in mind. So, the names would be unified as food items that one puts inside [a refrigerator]. The Saiyans are vegetables, the Ginyu Special-Squad are dairy products, that kind of thing.
Source Spelling:: フリーザー/furiizaa
Name Spelling: フリーザ/Furiiza

King Cold
A play on the English word “cold”, in keeping with his sons’ icy names. The character's name, however, is not spelled exactly like "cold" is in Japanese (see below). Like Pilaf, his Japanese title is 大王/daiou, meaning “great king’, and used for such people as Alexander the Great and King Kamehameha I.
Toriyama Explanation: “From the image of a refrigerator, I came up with ‘cold’.” [DBF]
Source Spelling: コールド/Koorudo
Name Spelling: コルド/Korudo

Kyui
Toriyama Explanation: “I don’t have a single memory of this, but I’d think that it’s probably from the kiwi fruit. It’s the same reasoning behind Zarbon and Dodoria below: using fruit rather than vegetables, since the character isn’t a Saiyan.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: キウイ/kiui
Name Spelling: キュイ/Kyui

Zarbon:
Taken from zabon, the Japanese name for pomelo, a citrus fruit whose green color matches Zarbon’s skin.
Toriyama Explanation: “This is taken straight from zabon. That big thing that’s like an orange.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ザボン/zabon
Name Spelling: ザーボン /Zaabon

Dodoria:
Named after the durian fruit, which are as spiky as he is.
Toriyama Explanation: “It’s a pun on durian .” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ドリアン/dorian
Name Spelling: ドドリア/Dodoria

Apule
Toriyama Explanation: “From ‘apple’.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: アップル/appuru
Name Spelling: /アプールApuuru

Ginyu Special-Squad
Each member of the squad is named for a dairy product. The Special-Squad itself (特戦隊/toku-sentai in Japanese) is named after the Super Sentai series, a genre of Japanese children's television programs that feature teams of costumed superheroes battling monsters. These shows are produced by Toei, owner of Toei Animation, the animation studio responsible for DragonBall, DragonBall Z, and DragonBall GT. Footage from Japanese sentai shows were edited, dubbed, and combined with new footage of American actors to create Power Rangers. Sentai shows typically feature teams of five costumed heroes, each one a different color, who fight using elaborate poses that originated in Kabuki theater. The connection to the Ginyu Special-Squad should be obvious. In his Daizenshuu 2 interview, Toriyama admits this connection, saying his inspiration was his son’s love of sentai shows. The Great Saiyaman also shows a strong sentai influence.

Ginyu
From milk, specifically cow’s milk.
Toriyama Explanation: “This is of course from gyuunyuu. I thought it’d be good to think of the names from things that you put in refrigerators, so I was able to complete the names for the Freeza-related characters without much difficulty.”
Source Spelling:: 牛乳/gyuunyuu
Name Spelling: ギニュー/Ginyuu

Gurd
Toriyama Explanation: “I thought that I’d name all of Ginyu’s underlings after dairy products, and Gurd is taken from yogurt.”
Source Spelling:: ヨーグルト/yooguruto
Name Spelling: グルド/Gurudo

Jheeze
Toriyama Explanation: “This is a pun on cheese.”
Source Spelling:: チーズ/chiizu
Name Spelling: ジース/Jiisu

Butta
Toriyama Explanation: “Butter of course.”
Source Spelling:: バター/bataa
Name Spelling: バータ/Baata

Recoome
Toriyama Explanation: “It’s cream.”
Source Spelling:: クリーム/kuriimu
Name Spelling: リクーム/Rikuumu

Babidi and co.

Dabra
Toriyama Explanation: “This was taken from the famous magic word ‘abracadabra’.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: アブラカダブラ/aburakadabura
Name Spelling: ダーブラ/Daabura

Bibidi:
Bibidi, his son Babidi, and his creation Majin Boo are all named for the magic phrase “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo”, which originated in one of the songs from the Disney animated version of Cinderella. The phrase has since become commonly used as a generic magical phrase. Toriyama doesn’t specifically mention the Disney connection in DB Forever, but he’s admitted many times to being a fan of Disney movies (noting in his Daizenshuu 6 that 101 Dalmatians had a huge influence on him).
Toriyama Explanation: “This is the first part of the magic word below. [bibbity-boppity-boo]”
Source Spelling:: ビビデバビデブー/bibide-babide-buu
Name Spelling: ビビディ/Bibidi

Babidi
Toriyama Explanation: “This is taken from the famous magical word ‘Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ビビデバビデブー/bibide-babide-buu
Name Spelling: バビディ/Babidi

Majin Boo
As mentioned, “Boo” comes from “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo”. A 魔人/majin (literally a magical or demonic person), is a general term for beings from mythology or fiction who possess strong magical powers and other abilities that far surpass that of ordinary people. The term is often used in Japanese to refer to the jinn (genie) of Arabian folklore, or the Hindu asura, while the “genie of the lamp” from the story of Aladdin is commonly called the “majin of the lamp” in Japanese.
Toriyama Explanation: “It’s the last part of the above magic word [Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo].” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ビビデバビデブー/bibide-babide-buu
Name Spelling: ブウ/Buu

Yakon
He probably gets his name from tekumaku-mayakon, a magical chant that originates from the late 1960s anime Himitsu no Akko-chan (most of the following is from the show’s Japanese Wikipedia entry ). In the show, Akko-chan uses this phrase to transform through the power of a magic compact mirror given to her by a mirror spirit. All she has to do is say “Tekumaku-mayakon, become a _____”, and fill in what it is she wants to become. “Tekumaku-mayakon” is actually an abbreviation of “Technical Magic My Compact”. In order to turn back to normal, she must say “Rami-pasu rami-pasu ru ru ru” (rami-pasu being ‘Super Mirror’ in reverse).
Source Spelling:: テクマクマヤコン/Tekumakumayakon
Name Spelling: ヤコン/Yakon

Pui-Pui
In keeping with the “magic” theme of Babidi and co., he probably gets his name from Chichin-puipui, a Japanese good luck charm that mothers, nurses, and the like use when children hurt themselves. I suppose it’s similar to saying “Let me kiss it to make it stop hurting.” It’s also used as a magic chant in ninja shows and Arabian Nights-themed shows aimed at children. It has also been used as the name for several children's shows. Apparently Arnold Schwarzenegger made a commercial in Japan where he sang this chant to the tune of Leningrad (don’t ask me…).
Source Spelling:: ちちんぷいぷい/chichin-puipui
Name Spelling: プイプイ/Puipui

21st Tenkaichi Budoukai

Namu:
This comes from the Buddhist phrase 南無阿弥陀仏/namu-amida-butsu (originally namo'mitābhāya. in Sanskrit), an invocation of Amitābha, the “Buddha of Infinite Light”. The phrase is used as a chant during meditation. In the series, Namu himself says this chant when performing the Tenku-Pekeji-Ken on Goku (in Viz this is rendered “In the name of the Buddha!”). Incidentally, according to the guidebooks Namu has two younger brothers named Ami and Dabu, whose names are also clearly derived from this.
Toriyama Explanation: “I don’t remember at all, but wouldn’t his name probably just be derived from ‘Namu-amida-butsu’?” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: 南無阿弥陀仏/Namu-amida-butsu
Name Spelling: ナム/Namu

Bacterian
Toriyama Explanation: “A took his name from bacteria, because of his dirty image. However, now that I think about it, if there were no bacteria we wouldn’t be able to live. Sorry bacteria.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: バクテリア/bakuteria
Name Spelling: バクテリアン/Bakuterian

Ran-Fan
Toriyama Explanation: “When I was working in an advertising company, female underwear was called ‘Ran-Fan’. This comes from an abbreviation of ‘Lingerie and Foundation’. The character has that sort of image.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ランジェリー・ファンデーション/Ranjerii Fandeeshon
Name Spelling: ランファン /Ran-Fan

Giran
He’s described in the manga and by Toriyama in the DB Forever pun guide as a 怪獣/kaijuu, meaning “monster”, but often used specifically for giant “suitmation” movie monsters like Godzilla and Rodan, so he’s named to sound like one. Compare “Giran” to “Angiras” or “Rodan.
Toriyama Explanation: “It simply feels like a typical monster [kaijuu] name. ” [DBF]
Name Spelling: ギラン/Giran

Jackie Chun
Toriyama Explanation: “Of course, this comes from slightly distorting the name of my beloved Jackie Chan.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ジャッキー・チェン/Jakkii Chen
Name Spelling: ジャッキー・チュン /Jakkii Chun

22nd Tenkaichi Budoukai

King Chapa
Toriyama Explanation: “In Indian cuisine there’s a dish called chapatti, and he looked Indian, so I took his name from there.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: チャパティ/chapati
Name Spelling: チャパ/Chapa

Panputto
Toriyama Explanation: “Um…I can’t even remember the character. It’s a Tai-esque name though, so I guess he was that sort of character.” [DBF]
Name Spelling: パンプット/Panputto

23rd Tenkaichi Budoukai

Shen
Taken from the Japanese approximation of the Chinese reading of 神, 'god', which is the same place the shen in Shenlong comes from. The normal Japanese readings of the kanji are kami for the kun reading (like in Kami’s name) and shin for the on reading (like in Kaioshin). The name itself is written in katakana, not kanji, perhaps to further disguise his true identity.
Toriyama Explanation: “From the Chinese reading of神/kami.”
Source Spelling:: 神/shin or kami, shen in Chinese
Name Spelling: シェン/Shen

Ma Junior
Ma means “demon” while “junior” means, well, junior. Here ma is written in katakana rather than kanji. In other words, it’s written to signify simply the sound “ma”, rather than to convey the specific meaning of “demon”. There’s no real equivalent to this sort of thing in English, but it’s sorta like phonetically spelling things either to obscure their meaning, or just to look cool (light as “lite”, “Froot Loops” instead of “Fruit Loops”…well, I guess that’s done because they don’t contain any actual fruit per say). Anyway, with this spelling he’s not exactly blatantly calling himself a demon. “Junior” is written in katakana as well, and not as “Jr.”, which is actually used in Japanese, like when writing Garlic Jr.’s name (ガーリックJr.).
Source Spelling: 魔Jr./ma jyunia
Name Spelling: マジュニア/Ma Jyunia

25th Tenkaichi Budoukai

Idasa
An anagram of dasai, meaning lame or out of fashion.
Toriyama Explanation: “Personally, I can’t think of his hairstyle as being at all cool, so I made his name a pun on dasai ” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ダサイ/dasai
Name Spelling: イダーサ /Idaasa

Ikose:
An anagram of sekoi, meaning petty or small-minded
Toriyama Explanation: “This is a pun on sekoi” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: セコイ/sekoi
Name Spelling: イコーセ/Ikoose

Pyontatto
This is one of the kids from the Youth Division. He makes his opponent cry.
Toriyama Explanation: “I don’t think this name is supposed to sound like much of anything. I can’t remember.” [DBF]

Webley
Pyontatto’s opponent, who bursts into tears. Probably named for Webley & Scott guns.
Toriyama Explanation: “I don’t really remember, but I think this was probably taken from England’s cool-looking Webley revolvers.” [DBF]

Kira
Toriyama Explanation: “I think that I took this from ‘killer’, like an assassin. ” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: キラー/kiraa
Name Spelling: キーラ /Kiira

Jewel
Toriyama Explanation: “He’s a snobby character, so I took his name from jewels.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: ジュエル/jyueru
Name Spelling: ジュエール /Jyueeru

Mighty Mask
Toriyama Explanation: “The characters are completely different, but there used to be this cartoon (probably American) called Mighty Mouse, which as the name suggests was about a powerful mouse; I just took the ambience of the name from there.” [DBF]

28th Tenkaichi Budoukai

Mou Kekko:
Written with the kanji for “ferocious”, “blood”, and “tiger”, seemingly a suitable name for this giant, mean-looking guy. However, it’s actually a play on mou kekkou, a Japanese phrase that effectively means something like "I'm fine", or “that’s enough”. Like if a waiter offers you more bread or something and you don’t need any more, that sort of thing.
Toriyama Explanation: “The characters on their own seemed strong, but of course this is a worthless pun on the phrase mou kekko.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: もう結構/mou kekkou
Name Spelling: 猛血虎/Mou Kekko

Captain Chicken
Toriyama Explanation: “I imagined him as a chicken-version of Captain America.” [DBF]
Name Spelling: キャプテン・チキン/

Otoko-Suki
A play on 男好き/otoko-zuki, “boy-crazy”.
Source Spelling: 男好き/otoko-zuki
Name Spelling: オトコスキー/otoko-sukii

Knock
Probably a pun on “knock out”, which is exactly what happens to him.
Source Spelling: ノックアウト/nokku-auto
Name Spelling: ノック/Nokku

Uranai Baba and co.

Uranai Baba
占い/Uranai means fortune-telling or divination, while baba is a fairly rude term for an older woman, kind of like “hag” or “crone”. Therefore, she’s the Fortune-telling Crone. ババ

Dracula Man
Because he’s Dracula, man.

Suke-san [usually called the Invisible Man in English versions]
透ける/sukeru means “transparent”, or “see-through”, while san is a Japanese honorific more or less equivalent to “mister”. So basically he’s “Mr. See-Through”. The name may further be a reference to the Mitokoumon character Sasaki Sukesaburou (佐々木助三郎), called “Suke-san”(助さん) for short. Mitokoumon was a fictionalized version of the travels of Tokugawa Mitsukuni (aka Mito Mitsukuni), which has been adapted into several TV dramas. To quote this forum, the story is about how ‘former Vice Shogun Mito Mitsukuni travelled incognito around Japan with his retainers ‘Suke-san’ and ‘Kaku-san’ righting injustice”.
Toriyama Explanation: “It’s embarrassing to explain, but since he’s see-through [suketeiru] he’s Suke-san.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: 透ける/sukeru + さん/san
Name Spelling: スケさん/Suke-san

Mummy-kun
Named after miira, Japanese for “mummy”, which is derived from the Portuguese mirra, meaning “myrrh” (myrrh being used as an embalming ointment to make mummies). Kun is a Japanese honorific generally used for males which one is on familiar terms with. I guess the joke is that it’s a rather cutesy thing to call a centuries-old mummy.
Source Spelling: ミイラ (木乃伊)/miira
Name Spelling: ミイラくん/Miira-kun

Akkuman:
This come from slightly altering 悪魔/akuma, “devil”, then combining it with “man”. Kinda like naming a demon-based superhero “Deman” or something.
Toriyama Explanation: “Since he’s demonic I named him Akkuman, but I carelessly forgot and made a manga that was also named “AkkuMan” [generally spelt “Ackman” in alphabet]. I guess it’s a pretty simple idea” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: 悪魔/akuma + マン/man
Name Spelling: アックマン/Akkuman

Misc

Mutaito
武/mu refers to the martial arts (it’s the same kanji used to write the bu in budoukai), while 泰斗/taito is an abbreviation of 泰山北斗/taizanhokuto, meaning a great authority; the phrase comes from the New Book of Tang. Therefore, “Mutaito” essentially translate to “a great authority of the martial arts”.
Toriyama Explanation: “Sorry, but I don’t remember” [DBF]

Shapner
A play on “pencil sharpener”.
Source Spelling: シャープナー/shaapunaa
Name Spelling: シャプナー/Shapunaa

Erasa
A player on “eraser”
Source Spelling: イレイサー/ireisaa
Name Spelling: イレーザ/ireeza

Randosel Town
In keeping with the school theme for some of the character/place names during Gohan’s stint as a high school student, this comes directly from ランドセル/randoseru, “backpack” or “satchel”, which derives from the German raenzel. Accordingly, in Viz the place is called “Backpack Town”.
Source Spelling: ランドセル/randoseru
Name Spelling: same

Sno
Toriyama Explanation: “She’s a girl from a cold village, so her name comes from ‘snow’.”
Source Spelling:: スノー/sunoo
Name Spelling: スノ/Suno

Bora
Toriyama Explanation: “I don’t think there’s any particular meaning.”
Name Spelling: ボラ/Bora

Upa
Toriyama Explanation: “If I’m not mistaken, I think it was that my assistant Matsuyama had I dog named this at his parents’ house, and I said ‘Ah, that’s a good name!’”
Name Spelling: ウパ /Upa

Grandma Paozu
The old lady who gives Bulma and Goku the 6-star ball in exchange for beating Oolong. For whatever reason her name was left out of the Viz translation. She’s named after baozi (read as Paozu in Japanese), Chinese steamed buns, similar to the Japanese manjuu, steamed buns with red bean paste filling. Mt. Paozu, Goku and family’s home in the anime, is named for the same thing.
Toriyama Explanation: “I think that’s the Chinese name for manjuu.”
Source Spelling:: 包子/baozi or paozu
Name Spelling: パオズ/Paozu

Hejj, Hogg, & Lee
The 3 girls Oolong kidnaps. Like Grandma Paozu, their names are left out in Viz.
Toriyama Explanation: “When I was trying to think of what to name these characters, my eyes fell on a Tamiya plastic tank model with the nickname “Hedgehog”. Sure enough, Lee is also the nickname of a tank.” [DBF]

Toninjinka
The boss of the Rabbit Gang. His name translates to “Rabbit who Turns People into Carrots”, the “Carrotizer Bunny”, in other words.
Toriyama Explanation: “Just like his name says. He’s a rabbit [to] that transforms [ka] people into carrots [ninjin].” [DBF]
Name Spelling: 兎人参化/Toninjinka

Gerinovitch
A philosopher mentioned by one of Gohan’s high school teachers. Possibly named for geri, “diarrhea”. In Viz his name is therefore changed to some variant on “diarrhea”, though I can’t remember exactly what it is.
Source Spelling: 下痢/geri
Name Spelling: ゲリノビッチ/Gerinobicchi
Last edited by Herms on Mon Apr 25, 2011 1:47 pm, edited 9 times in total.
Kanzenshuu: Is that place still around?
Sometimes, I tweet things
We might, if they screamed all the time, for no good reason.

User avatar
Herms
Kanzenshuu Co-Owner & Administrator
Posts: 10527
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 6:40 pm
Location: Jupiter
Contact:

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby Herms » Fri Mar 12, 2010 4:23 am

Part II, with anime characters, and random grab-bag stuff

DB Filler

RR Army Arc

Doctor Frappe:
Named for frappe, which in Japanese refers to shaved ice flavored with syrup.
Source Spelling:: フラッペ/furappe
Name Spelling: same

Pre-22nd TB Filler

Kinkaku, Ginkaku
Their names mean “Gold Horn” and “Silver Horn”, and they are named after a pair of demon kings who appear in Journey to the West. The JttW characters had a man-eating gourd just like the DB pair.

Hyouga Tenron
豹牙/Hyouga means “leopard-fang”, and 天龍/Tenron means “heavenly dragon”.

Chin Taiken and Chin Shouken
大拳/Taiken means “big fist” while 小拳/Shouken means “little fist”.

Shura
His name probably comes from “asura”, Hindu demons written as 阿修羅/ashura in Japanese.
Source Spelling:: 阿修羅/ashura
Name Spelling: シュラ/Shura

Mera, Gora
Their names are probably a play on Ox-Head (牛頭/Gozu) and Horse-Face (馬頭/Mezu), demons who guard Hell in Buddhist folklore. The “zu” in Gozu and Mezu has simply been replaced with “ra”, probably to match Shura’s name.

Inoshikachou
A combination of 猪/inoshishi (boar), 鹿/shika (deer), and 蝶/chou (butterfly), the three animals which make up this chimera. Why would anyone think of sticking these 3 animals together? Well, in the Japanese card game Koi-Koi, inoshikachou/Boar-Deer-Butterfly is one of the yaku, the special card combinations one tries to form in the game to score points. Koi-Koi is played on hanafuda cards, which depict animals, among other patterns. So to get an inoshikachou yaku, one simply combines the boar, deer, and butterfly cards. Apparently this scores 5 points.
Source Spelling:: 猪鹿蝶/Inoshikachou
Name Spelling: イノシカチョウ/Inoshikachou

Tanmen
“Tanmen” is also the name of a salty ramen topped with sautéed vegetables.
Source Spelling:: タンメン/Tanmen
Name Spelling: same

Pinfu and Metanki Village
Both taken from Mahjong terms; Pinfu is named directly from one, while Metanki Village comes from mentanpin.
Source Spelling:: メンタンピン/mentanpin
Name Spelling: メンタンキ/mentanki

Pre-23rd TB Filler

Goro-Goro Mountains
Goro-goro is the Japanese onomatopoeia for the sound of thunder.

Mint
From…mint.

The Mousse Family
A huge family Goku meets in the anime while training for the 23rd TB. Just to be incredibly lazy, here’s Hujio’s explanations of these guy’s names.

Mousse (ムース; Muusu)
The father of the family, he is named after mousse, a light and creamy dessert typically made from egg and cream. In Japanese, mousse is simply written as ムース, exactly the same as the character is named.

Écla (エクレ; Ekure)
The mother of the family is named after a french pastry, known as the éclair, a long thin pastry filled with a cream and topped with icing. Interestingly, and I assume this is a completely unrelated coincidence, éclair is French for "lightning". And as you may recall, in this series of specific filler episodes, Goku is trying to learn how to become faster than lightning. Anyway, in Japanese éclair is written as エクレア (ekurea), making it pretty easy to pick up the character's name pun.

Puri (プーリ; puuri)
The youngest child of the family, she is named after pudding, specifically for custard pudding . In FUNimation's English dub she's renamed "Cupcake", for some unknown reason. In Japanese, pudding is written as プリン (purin), which is quite similar to the character's name.

Crepe (クレプ; kurepu)
The second youngest child of the family, she is named after crêpe, a type of very thin pancake popular in France, and now internationally. In FUNimation's English dub she's renamed "Pudding", but I assume most American's know what a crêpe is these days, right? Her name is only missing the vowel elongation, as crêpe is written as クレープ (kureepu) in Japanese.

Donuts (ドナッツ; donattsu)
He is the third youngest child of the family, and is obviously named after the worldwide famous deep-fat-fried pastry known as the donut, or doughnut. The spelling of his name does differ slightly from the proper Japanese writing of donuts (ドーナツ; doonatsu), with the emphasis being placed on the last consonant.

Jelly (ゼリ; zeri)
The fourth youngest child of the family, she is named after what most countries would call fruit preserves, but is simply called "jelly" in North America. Jelly is written as ゼリー (zerii) in Japanese, elongating the last vowel.

Bisce (ビスケ; bisuke)
Bisce appears to be a twin with Jelly as they look almost identical and wear the same type of clothes, but while it is strongly hinted at, it is never actually confirmed. His name most likely comes from what most Americans call a biscuit, rather than the English biscuit, which is a small, sweetened, and flour based product, very similar to what Americans would consider a cookie. I say this because most Americans put jelly on the biscuits, further enforcing the notion that the two characters are twins. However, in the FUNimation English dub, he is renamed "Jam", most likely to even further connect him with his "twin" sister Jelly. While I'm not so sure it was really warranted to dumb it down that much, it does still retain their connection. So I guess I can't complain too much, right? Anyway, biscuit is written as ビスケット (bisuketto) in Japanese. I will note that oddly enough, the name Bisuke, written in katakana, is actually a common Japanese female name.

Bavaro (ババロ; babaro)
The fourth oldest child of the family, he is name after bavarois, or Bavarian cream, which is a classic Swiss dessert. The dessert is a gelatin-thickened cream pastry flavored with liqueur. Bavarois is written as ババロア (babaroa) in Japanese. FUNimation chose to rename the character "Cream Puff", which fits the character well and gets the name pun across.

Choco (チョコ; choko)
The third oldest child of the family, he is named after chocolate. His name isn't actually a shortening of the word, as in Japanese "chocolate" is simply written as チョコ (choko), just as the characters name is written. In the FUNiamtion English dub, the character is simply called "Cocoa", which again, makes much more sense to most Americans.

Cooky (クッキー; kukkii)
She is the second oldest child of the family and is named after the cookie. In Japanese, cookie is simply written as クッキー, exactly the same as the character is named. However, the word クッキー can also be translated as biscuit, depending on the context and origin of the word, which I discussed earlier in regards to the character Bisce.

Chouc (シューク; shuuku)
The oldest child of the family, he is named after the French pastry chou à la crème, a sphere of light airy pastry split and sandwiched with a thick layer of whipped cream. The phrase is written in Japanese as シュー・クリーム (shuu kuriimu). As you can see, the last part of the phrase was left out of his name. Now, I'm guessing that FUNimation got the characters all sorts of confused, because they renamed this character "Crepe", even though they had already renamed the original "Crepe" to "Pudding", and renamed "Pudding" to "Cupcake".

Mt. Frypan Filler

Jasmine
Named for Jasmine Tea. Since he’s a pig man from Oolong’s hometown, he’s likewise named after a tea.
Source Spelling:: ジャスミン茶/Jasumin-cha
Name Spelling: ジャスミン/Jasumin

Unnan
Named for Yunnan tea, the general name for the tea from China’s Yunnan province. Puar’s namesake Pu-erh tea comes from Yunnan.
Source Spelling:: 雲南茶/Unnan-cha
Name Spelling: ウンナン/Unnan

Grandma Hakkake
A play on both 八角形/hakkaku-kei, “octagon”, and歯が欠ける( /ha ga kakeru, to have teeth broken or missing. The joke is that Goku and Chi Chi seek her out expecting her name to mean the former, but find out it means the later.

Annin
Named after 杏仁豆腐/annin-doufu, almond jelly, a Chinese dessert. Her godly title, Taijouroukun (太上老君), is taken straight from one of the names of Laozi, the founder of Taoism (specifically, it's the name of the deified Laozi). Laozi, as Taijouroukun, appears in Journey to the West, where he tries to destroy the monkey king by placing him inside his mystical furnace. Goku's encounter with Annin seems to be loosely based on this episode.
Source Spelling:: 杏仁豆腐/annin-doufu
Name Spelling: アンニン/Annin

DBZ Filler

Saiyan Arc Filler

Nemuria Ruins
Almost certainly a reference to the fabled lost continent of Lemuria. It’s possibly also a pun on nemuri, “sleep”, in keeping with how the excavation robot slumbered here.
Source Spelling: レムリア/Remuria and 眠り/nemuri
Name Spelling: ネムリア/Nemuria

Phantom Saiyans
Though they’re given no specific names in the actual series or any guidebooks, in the Famicom game “DBZ: Kyoushuu! Saiya-jin”, they are named “Broco” (ブロッコ/Burokko) and “Onion” (オニオン/Onion), puns on broccoli and, well, onions.

Planet Arlia
As it happens, this planet’s name matches the Japanese spelling for “Aryan”: Planet Arlia is アーリア星/Aaria-sei, while the Aryan race is アーリア人/Aaria-jin. The names for the planet’s inhabitants seem to have an “ancient/fabled civilization” theme, so could the Aryan race be what they were thinking of? Alternatively, or perhaps additionally, it could be a play on ari, Japanese for ant. This sort of matches the planet’s insectoid race, though they look more like grasshoppers than ants.

Lemuria
Her name exactly matches that of the fabled lost continent of Lemuria, originally proposed to explain how lemurs were distributed throughout the world, but later adopted by all sorts of occult/theosophist sorts as the supposed home of all sorts of ancient super-races.
Source Spelling: レムリア大陸/Remuria-tairiku
Name Spelling: レムリア/Remuria

Atla
His name probably comes from the lost continent of Atlantis.
Source Spelling: アトランティス/Atorantisu
Name Spelling: アトラ/Atora

King Moai
“Moai” is the name for the Easter Island statues.
Source Spelling: モアイ/Moai
Name Spelling: same

Yedi
His (its?) name is extremely close to how “yeti” is spelled in Japanese, so I’m guessing it’s a play on that. This doesn’t really fit with the “ancient/fabled civilization” theme of the other Arlians, though they all fit into a general “mysteries of the world” theme, and both the yeti and the fabled city of Shangri-la are usually placed in the Himalayas.
Source Spelling:: イエティ/ Ieti
Name Spelling: イエディ/Iedi

Gozu, Mezu
Named for Ox-Head (Gozu) and Horse-Face (Mezu), the guardians of Hell in Chinese mythology.
Source Spelling:: 牛頭馬頭/Gozu-Mezu
Name Spelling: ゴズ, メズ/Gozu, Mezu

Fake Namek and Real Namek

Raichi
Named for lychee, a subtropical fruit tree.
Source Spelling:: ライチ/raichi
Name Spelling: Same

Zarkuro
Derived from the Japanese name for pomegranate.
Source Spelling:: ザクロ/zakuro
Name Spelling: ザークロ/Zaakuro

Oren
Taken from “orange”. One should never compare him to Appule.
Source Spelling:: オレンジ/orenji
Name Spelling: オーレン/Ooren

Blueberry
Named for, well, blueberries. Actually his name is spelled differently than the word blueberry itself is in Japanese, but I can’t think of a way to convey that which doesn’t look really stupid. Buluberi? Well, whatever.
Source Spelling:: ブルーベリー/buruuberii
Name Spelling: ブールベリ/buuruberi

Raspberry
Named for raspberries. Again, his name isn’t spelled quite the same as the actual word raspberry in Japanese, but frankly I don’t care enough about him or his partner to work out spellings to appropriately convey this.
Source Spelling:: ラズベリー/razuberii
Name Spelling: ラーズベリ/Raazuberi

Garlic Jr. Arc

The Four Heavenly Kings of the Demon Realm
The title for Garlic Jr.’s four henchmen from his filler arc. The term “Four Heavenly Kings” (四天王/shiten-nou in Japanese) originally referred to four Buddhist gods who guarded over the cardinal directions, similar to the Kaios in DB. The term has come to be commonly used for any group of 4 people famous in a particular field (Hironobu Kageyama, for instance, is sometimes counted as one of the shiten-nou of anime songs). It’s also often used for groups of 4 boss characters in manga, anime, or video games. The term pops up in Pokemon (as the Japanese name for the Elite 4), Sailor Moon (as generals of the Dark Kingdom), Kinnikuman (for Kinnikuman Zebra’s team), Toriko (used for the top 4 gourmets), and lots more. So these guys are like that, only for Garlic Jr.’s Demon Clan.

Vinegar
Named directly after vinegar.
Source Spelling:: ビネガー/binegaa
Name Spelling: same

Gashew
Named for sugar.
Source Spelling:: シュガー/shugaa
Name Spelling: ガッシュ/Gasshu

Zard
Named for salt.
Source Spelling:: ソルト/soruto
Name Spelling: ゾルド/Zorudo

Tard
Named for mustard.
Source Spelling:: マスタード/masutaado
Name Spelling: タード/Taado

Maron
In keeping with Kuririn’s chestnut theme, she’s named for “marron”, French for a particular kind of chestnut. Unlike Kuririn’s daughter, her name is spelled exactly like the katakana spelling for “marron”, although the alphabet spelling of Kuririn’s daughter’s name matches the actual French spelling of “marron”.
Source Spelling: マロン/maron
Name Spelling: same

Other Post-Freeza Pre-Android Filler

Shuu Sai-aku
Sai is written with the kanji for “disaster”, and aku with the kanji for “evil”. Also, together sai-aku is a homonym for 最悪, “the worst”. So in other words, it’s an evil name for an evil tutor. 周/Shuu (Zhou in Chinese) is an actual Chinese family name.
Source Spelling: 最悪/sai-aku
Name Spelling: 周災悪/Shuu Sai-aku

Yuzukar
Probably comes from “used car”, in keeping with him being old.

Cynthia
Her name is spelled exactly like the name “Cynthia” is in Japanese, but it’s probably also a pun on shinsha, “new car”, the opposite of her partner’s name.
Source Spelling:: 新車/shinsha
Name Spelling: シンシア/Shinshia

Pre-Cell Games Filler

Bourbon
From bourbon whisky.
Source Spelling: バーボン/Baabon
Name Spelling: same

Lime
From “lime”.
Source Spelling: ライム/raimu
Name Spelling: same

Rao Chuu
This is the name of Lime’s grandfather, which is apparently only revealed in the credits. It derives from raochuu (laojiu in Chinese), Chinese fermented alcohol, in particular Shaoxing wine. The kanji itself mean “old alcohol
Source Spelling:: 老酒/, ろうしゅ/roushu, ラオチュー/raochuu, ラオチュウ/raochuu
Name Spelling:[/u] ラオ・チュウ/Rao Chuu

Vodka
Named directly after vodka, Russian distilled liquor. There seems to be something of an alcohol theme running through the filler characters from the 9 days leading up to the Cell Games.

Anoyo-Ichi Budoukai

Paikuhan
Named after 排骨/paikuu, “pork ribs”, and 飯/han, “rice”; in other words, pork ribs with a side of rice.
Source Spelling:: 排骨飯/paikuu-han
Name Spelling: パイクーハン/Paikuuhan

Migoren
Named after Mee goreng, a common Indonesian fried egg noodles dish.
Source Spelling:: ミーゴレン/miigoren
Name Spelling: ミゴレン/Migoren

Sarte
A play on Satay.
Source Spelling:: サテ/sate
Name Spelling: サーテ/Saate

Olibue
Named after the olive.
Source Spelling: オリーブ/oriibu
Name Spelling: オリブー/Oribuu

Chapu-Chai
Named straight from chapuchai, which is apparently some variant of Chop suey. In Japanese, Chop suey itself is チャプスイ/chapusui, so you can see the connection
Source Spelling: チャプチャイ/chapuchai
Name Spelling: same

Catapi
Named after the humble caterpillar.
Source Spelling: キャタピラ/kyatapira
Name Spelling: キャタピー/kyatapii

Jinkyo
Named after kyoujin, “giant”.
Source Spelling: 巨人/kyoujin
Name Spelling: ジンキョウ/Jinkyou

Tolbie
Named for the beetle, which he resembles.
Source Spelling: ビートル/biitoru
Name Spelling: トルビー/Torubii

Tapikar
His name probably comes from tapioca, meaning he’s kinda infringing on Tapion’s turf.
Source Spelling: タピオカ/tapioka
Name Spelling: タピカー/Tapikaa

Frog
I think it’s more than obvious where this froggy-looking fighter’s name comes from. This is actually another instance of the name not being spelled exactly like the source, but it being kinda hard to really convey that with an alphabet spelling without looking like you’re just being obtuse (Fulog?). Incidentally, the Chrono Trigger character’s name is originally “Kaeru”, Japanese for frog, so these two characters’ names aren’t very similar in Japanese.
Source Spelling: フロッグ/furoggu
Name Spelling: フーログ/Fuurogu

Maraiko
Named directly after a type of Chinese castella sponge cake.
Source Spelling: マーライコー/maaraikoo
Name Spelling: same

Aqua
Derived from “aqua”, since he’s a fish guy and all.
Source Spelling: アクア/akua
Name Spelling: アークア/Aakua

Great Saiyaman Arc

Angela
This is an actual name, derived from “angel”. This contrasts nicely with Videl’s devil-derived name.

TV Special 1

Tohma
Derived from “tomato”. I wonder if they named him after a red vegetable because he ends up providing Bardock’s blood-stained bandanna?
Source Spelling:: トマト/tomato
Name Spelling: トーマ/Tooma

Selipa
An anagram of “parsley”
Source Spelling:: パセリ/paseri
Name Spelling: セリパ/Seripa

Toteppo
Taken from “potato”
Source Spelling:: ポテト/poteto
Name Spelling: トテッポ/Toteppo

Panpukin
From “pumpkin”.
Source Spelling:: パンプキン/panpukin
Name Spelling: パンブーキン/Panbuukin

Tooro
The last surviving Kanassian, only named in the credits. Since Planet Kanassa itself is named for fish, he also has a fish-derived name: it’s taken from toro, fatty tuna used in sushi. Scientists have shown that toro is the most delicious thing in the history of ever, tied with peanut butter M&Ms.
Source Spelling:: トロ/toro
Name Spelling: トオロ/Tooro

GT

Giru
Apparently he’s simply named for the fact that he constantly makes “giru-giru” noises.

Don Kia [GTPF]
In keeping with Planet Imegga’s money theme, he’s named after akindo, merchant.
Source Spelling:: 商人/akindo
Name Spelling: ドン・キアー/Don Kiaa

Redict [GTPF]
Don Kia’s bodyguard. Continuing the money theme, his name comes from “credit”.
Source Spelling:: クレジット/kurejitto
Name Spelling: レジック/Rejikku

Futopa
An inhabitant of Imegga who I’m pretty sure is only named in the credits. His name comes from futoppara, “generous”.
Source Spelling:: 太っ腹/futoppara
Name Spelling: フトパ/Futopa

Riruka
Comes from kariru, “to borrow”.
Source Spelling: 借りる/kariru
[u]Name Spelling:
[/u]: リルカ/Riruka

Esuka
Comes from kaesu, “to return/pay back”.
Source Spelling:: 返す/kaesu
Name Spelling: エスカ/Esuka

Gel
Going by Imegga’s money theme, my guess is he’s named for “Geld”, German for money. Their respective katakana spellings are very similar.
Source Spelling:: ゲル/geru
Name Spelling: ゲール/Geeru

Shila
In keeping with the money theme, I’m guessing this comes from “schilling”, but I’m really not sure. Since her partner is (probably) named for German money, it’d make sense for her to be named after Austrian currency.

Zunama [GTPF]
A pun on namazu, “catfish”. Catfish are also said to be able to predict earthquakes.
Source Spelling:: ナマズ/namazu
Name Spelling: ズーナマ/Zuunama

Para Para Brothers
Named after Para-Para, a Japanese synchronized dance.

Mucchi Mocchi
He’s named for the fact that he carries around a whip. Muchi=whip and mochi=carry. God GT had some lame name puns.

Leon
Who’s this guy? Well, he’s a lion who showed up on Planet Lood. Leon=lion. Did I mention how GT has some lame name puns?

Lood [GTPF]
This is essentially “doll” written backwards.
Source Spelling:: ドール/dooru
Name Spelling: ルード/Ruudo

Doltakki [GTPF] otaku
He’s a doll otaku, and so his name is a combination of “doll” and “otakki”, another term for “otaku”.
Source Spelling:: ドール/dooru + オタッキー/otakkii
Name Spelling: ドルタッキー/Dorutakkii

Doctor Mu [GTPF]
He creates machine mutants, so his name is simply “mutant” minus the “tant”.
Source Spelling:: ミュータント/myuutanto
Name Spelling: ミュー/Myuu

General Rild [GTPF]
An anagram for “drill”.
Source Spelling:: ドリル/doriru
Name Spelling: リルド/Rirudo

Nehji
Derived from neji, Japanese for “screw”. The entire Sigma Squad seems to have a fastener tool theme.
Source Spelling:: ネジ /neji
Name Spelling: ネージ/Neeji

Nut
Taken directly from “nut”. The hardware hastener that it, not the food.
Source Spelling:: ナット/natto
Name Spelling: Same

Vis
Taken from “vis”, the French word for “screw”.
Source Spelling:: /
Name Spelling: /

Rivet
Taken from “rivet”.
Source Spelling:: リベト/ribeto
Name Spelling: リベット/Ribetto

Baby [GTPF]
Taken straight from the English word baby, since when he first appears he has a baby-like form.
Source Spelling:: ベビー/Bebii (there are also a couple different ways of writing the English word “baby” in katakana)
Name Spelling: same

Su Gorou and Su Kogorou
This comes from sugoroku, a Japanese dice game. 五郎/Gorou is an actual Japanese given name. Su Gorou’s son’s name, 小五郎/Kogorou, is another actual given name, and is simply the kanji for “little” added on to “Gorou”, making it an appropriate name for the little space tanuki.
Source Spelling:: 双六/ sugoroku
Name Spelling: スー五郎/Suugorou

Palace
Goten’s girlfriend. Her name comes from, well, palace. Why? For one she’s a sheltered rich girl, so I guess a swanky word like “palace” fits her. But more importantly, one of the Japanese words for palace is…goten (御殿), a homonym for her boyfriend’s name. This is easily the most subtle and clever name pun in GT, not that this says a whole hell of a lot.

Longe, Hammer, and Axe
The names of the 3 Baby-infected guys who fight Goten, who are named in the credits. Longe comes from ロン毛/ronge, “long hair”, Hammer comes straight from hammer, and Axe from axe.

Magure
The wimpy kid who manages to beat Goku at the Tenkaichi Budoukai in GT by sheer, unbelievable luck. Hence, his name is a pun on Maguure is a pun on magure, meaning ‘fluke’.
Source Spelling: 紛れ/magure
Name Spelling: マグーレ/Maguure

Bish
He lives in a fishing town, and so is named after “fish”. His pet seagull “Gull” has an equally brilliant name pun. OK, OK, English-based name puns like these aren’t as obvious to a Japanese audience, but still, “Bish”?
Source Spelling:: フィッシュ/fisshu
Name Spelling: ビッシュ/Bisshu

DB Movie 1

Gurumes: [D6]
Daizenshuu Explanation: “The name of Movie 1’s enemy, King Gurumes, is a pun on the word gourmet, meaning fine dining or a connoisseur of good food. At the time, there was a gourmet boom, with numerous collections of TV shows and magazines. King Gurumes was a character who adopted and embraced that trend.”
Source Spelling:: グルメ/gurume
Name Spelling: グルメス/Gurumesu

Bongo: [D10]
From vongole, as in spaghetti alle vongole, spaghetti with clam sauce.
Source Spelling:: ボンゴレ/bongore
Name Spelling: ボンゴ/Bongo

Pasta [D10]
Taken directly from “pasta”.
Source Spelling:: パスタ/ pasuta
Name Spelling: same

DB Movie 2

Lucifer [D6]
The short version is that this is simply the name of the devil, which is all the movie makers had on their mind (see below). The long versions is that “Lucifer” means “light-bearer” in Latin and originally simply referred to the morning star. It was used in Latin translations of the book of Isaiah to translate the Hebrew helel, “shining one”, which is used to mockingly describe the Babylonian king during a passage predicting said king’s fall from power. The passage describing the Babylonian king’s fall was later interpreted as describing the fall of Satan from heaven, and so “Lucifer” came to be treated as Satan’s original angelic name, back before his fall. Anyway, it’s kinda funny that the movie staff chose a name meaning “light-bearer” for a character who tries to blow up the sun.
Daizenshuu Explanation: “Lucifer in Movie 2 was a character modeled after a demon from the Bible.” [D6]
Source Spelling: ルシフェル/Rushiferu, but other spellings like ルシファー/Rushifaa are also used
Name Spelling: ルシフェル/Rushiferu

Ghaster: [D10]
As Daizenshuu 10 says, this comes from “gas table”, essentially a stove.
Source Spelling:: ガステーブル/gasuteeburu + el
Name Spelling: ガステル/Gasuteru

DBZ Movie 1

Garlic and Garlic Jr.: [D10]
All the bad guys in this movie are named for spices, and so this father-son duo are named directly after garlic.
Source Spelling:: ガーリック/gaarikku
Name Spelling: same

Ginger: [D10]
Named directly after “ginger”.
Source Spelling:: ジンジャー/jinjaa
Name Spelling: same

Nikki: [D10]
“Nikki” is Japanese for “cinnamon”.
Source Spelling:: ニッキ (肉桂)/nikki
Name Spelling: ニッキー/Nikkii

Sansho: [D10]
From sanshou, Sichuan pepper.
Source Spelling:: サンショウ (山椒)/sanshou
Name Spelling: サンショ/Sansho

DBZ Movie 2

Dr. Uiro [D6]
From uirou , a steamed rice cake that is one of the regional foods of Nagoya. His name is also spelled exactly like the name “Willow” is in katakana.
Daizenshuu Explanation: “Moving on, the names of the enemies who appeared in “The Strongest Guy in the World” all got their names from Nagoya specialties, such as uirou, Nagoya kochin, kishimen, ebi-fry, and misokatsu. These name puns were thought of by scenario writer Takao Koyama.”
Source Spelling:: ういろう(外郎)/uirou
Name Spelling: ウィロー/Uirou

Dr. Kochin: [D6]
His name comes from Nagoya Kochin, a special breed of free-range chicken raised in Nagoya.
Source Spelling:: 名古屋コーチン/Nagoya koochin
Name Spelling: コーチン/Koochin

Kishime: [D6]
From kishimen, a noodle made of flat strips; it’s another Nagoya regional specialty.
Source Spelling:: きしめん(棊子麺)/kishimen
Name Spelling: キシーメ/Kishiime

Ebifurya: [D6]
From ebi fry, that is, fried prawn.
Source Spelling:: エビフライ(海老フライ)/ebi-furai
Name Spelling: エビフリャー/Ebifuryaa

Misokattsun: [D6]
From misokkasa, miso lees.
Source Spelling:: 味噌カツ/
Name Spelling: ミソカッツン/Misokattsun

Bio-Men: [D10]
So named because they were created through bio-engineering. You probably already knew that, but Daizenshuu 10 bothers to point it out, so I figured I might as well include it.

DBZ Movie 3

Tullece: [D10]
In keeping with the Saiyan vegetable theme, he’s named for lettuce.
Source Spelling:: レタス/retasu
Name Spelling: ターレス/Taaresu

Amond: [D10]
From almond.
Source Spelling:: アーモンド/aamondo
Name Spelling: アモンド/Amondo

Daizu: [D10]
From daizu, “soybean”.
Source Spelling:: 大豆/daizu
Name Spelling: ダイーズ/Daiizu

Kakao: [D10]
From cacao.
Source Spelling:: カカオ/kakao
Name Spelling: same

Rezun]: [D10]
From raisin.
Source Spelling:: レーズン/reezun
Name Spelling: レズン/Rezun

Rakasei: [D10]
From rakkasei, “peanut”.
Source Spelling:: 落花生/rakkasei
Name Spelling: ラカセイ/Rakasei

DBZ Movie 4

Slug: [D10]
Since Namekians are named for slugs and snails and such, he’s named straight from the English word slug.
Source Spelling:: スラッグ/suraggu
Name Spelling: same

Angira: [D10]
Slug’s main henchmen are named after アンドロメダ星雲/Andoromeda-seiun, the Andromeda Galaxy: Angiras+Dorodabo+Medamatcha+Zeiun. Daizenshuu 10 says this naming scheme was chosen because they come from space. In addition to this official meaning, it’s possible that Angira’s name was also influenced in part by Anguirus (アンギラス/Angirasu), a monster from the Godzilla series.
Source Spelling:: アンドロメダ星雲/Andoromeda-Seiun
Name Spelling: アンギラ/Angira

Dorodabo: [D10]
Like the others, his name officially comes from “Andromeda Galaxy”. His name may also be influenced by the legend of Dorotabo, a ghostly, mud-covered torso that sticks out from the ground and wails on moonlit nights.
Source Spelling:: アンドロメダ星雲/Andoromeda-Seiun
Name Spelling: ドロダボ /Dorodabo

Medamatcha: [D10]
Again, his name officially comes from “Andromeda Galaxy”. In addition, his name may be partially derived from medama, “eyes”, since he has particularly big ones.
Source Spelling:: アンドロメダ星雲/Andoromeda-Seiun
Name Spelling: メダマッチャ /Medamaccha

Zeiun: [D10]
Derived from seiun, the “galaxy” in “Andromeda Galaxy”. Actually, nowadays seiun technically means “nebula” and not “galaxy”, but it was previously used for both. These days in Japanese the Andromeda Galaxy is called Andoromeda-ginga, rather than seiun.
Source Spelling:: アンドロメダ星雲/Andoromeda-Seiun
Name Spelling: ゼエウン /Zeeun

Kakuja: [D10]
From kagakusha, “scientist”.
Source Spelling:: 化学者/kagakusha
Name Spelling: カクージャ/Kakuuja

Gyushu
The other of Slug’s loser scientists. Possibly named for shugyou, “the pursuit of knowledge”.

DBZ Movie 5

Coola
Since his younger brother is named after the freezer, it’s fitting that he be named after a cooler. There’s a little bit more to it than that though…
Daizenshuu Explanation: “You’d normally think that since his younger brother is Freeza (Freeza=freezer) that his name would be Coola (cooler), but it’s not that simple. The truth is that it involves the Shizuoka dialect. The producer Mr. Morishita, who is from Shizuoka, was worried that ‘Cooler’ would be too direct, and remembered that in the dialect of his hometown one said ‘meshi demo kuura’ [sort of equivalent to ‘Let’s chow down’] when eating. Because of this, they used the Shizuoka dialect…and so they decided on the name Coola!! To think that it was so complicated a process…” [D6]
Source Spelling:: クーラー/kuuraa and メシでも食うら/meshi demo kuura
Name Spelling: クウラ/Kuura

Sauser: [D10]
From “Thousand Island Dressing”.
Source Spelling:: サウザンアイランド・ドレッシング/Sauzan-Airando Doresshingu
Name Spelling: サウザー/Sauzaa

Dore: [D10]
From “dressing”
Source Spelling:: ドレッシング/doresshingu
Name Spelling: ドーレ/Doore

Neiz: [D10]
From “mayonnaise”
Source Spelling:: マヨネーズ/mayoneezu
Name Spelling: ネイズ/Neizu

DBZ Movie 6

Metal Coola [D10]
Because he’s Coola, only made of metal you see. And no, he’s not “meta” in any way.

Big Gete Star
From getemono, meaning something that is a combination of different things or simply low quality; sort of similar to saying that something is ‘thrown together’. And of course it’s big, and, well, not actually a star, but a heavenly body of some sort.
Daizenshuu Explanation: “[…] there are also amazingly direct names like the Big Gete Star, called that because it was a huge thrown-together [getemono] planet.” [D6]
Source Spelling:: 下手物/getemono
Name Spelling: ビッグゲテスター/Biggu Gete Sutaa

DBZ Movie 7

Android No.13 [D10]
Besides following the main naming scheme for Gero’s androids, “13” was chosen because of its status as an unlucky number, and because it hadn’t been used for an android in the main story. 14 and 15 were then just filled in from there.

DBZ Movie 8

Broli: [D10]
Another Saiyan, another vegetable. This one’s from “broccoli”, a legendary vegetable said to delight in destruction and slaughter. The United Nations estimates that trillions of people die every day from broccoli-related accidents.
Source Spelling:: ブロッコリー/burokkorii
Name Spelling: ブロリー/Burorii

Paragus: [D10]
From “asparagus”
Source Spelling:: アスパラガス/Asuparagasu
Name Spelling: パラガス/Paragasu

Shamo:
Possibly derived from 軍鶏/shamo, a gamecock, specifically a Japanese breed of chicken used for cockfighting. Or maybe it just comes from inverting mosha-mosha, “shaggy” or “bushy”, which kind of describes this race’s hair.

Moa
Search me. Who is Moa, anyway?

DBZ Movie 9

Bojack: [D6]
From the adjective boujakubujin, meaning “arrogant” or “audacious”.
Daizenshuu Explanation: “In The Galaxy at the Brink!!~, Gohan was in the leading role as the one who protects Earth. The name of Bojack, who fought with Gohan, is a pun on the word boujakubujin, which means egotistical. Incidentally, the second half, bujin, was used for his underling Bujin.”
Source Spelling:: 傍若無人/boujakubujin
Name Spelling: ボージャック/Boojakku

Gokua: [D10]
From goku-aku, meaning heinous or otherwise extremely evil.
Source Spelling:: 極悪/goku-aku
Name Spelling: ゴクア/Gokua

Bido: [D10]
From hidou, meaning “unjust” or “inhumane”
Source Spelling::非道/hidou
Name Spelling: ビドー /Bidoo

Zangya: [D10]
From zangyaku, meaning “cruel”.
Source Spelling:: 残虐/zangyaku
Name Spelling: ザンギャ/Zangya

Bujin [D10]
From the second half of boujakubujin, meaning “pretty much like Donald Trump”.
Source Spelling:: 傍若無人/boujakubujin
Name Spelling: ブージン/Buujin

Gyousan Money, Okkane Money, and Doll Money
The family name “Money” comes from, well, “money”. Gyousan means “a lot”, while “Okkane” comes from okane, Japanese for “money”, and Doll comes straight from doru, the Japanese word for “dollar”.

Udo
A contestant Gohan beats easily. Probably named for the Udo plant, and in particular the phrase udo no taiboku, meaning a good-for-nothing (since the Udo plant isn’t very sturdy).

Dosukoi
A sumo wrestler. Accordingly, “Dosukoi” is a chant sumo wrestlers say.

Kung-Fun
A kung-fu fighter. You get 3 guesses as to where his name comes from, but the first 2 don’t count, and neither does the last one.

DBZ Movie 10

Koko:
Her and Natade Village itself are named for nata de coco, coconut milk.
Daizenshuu Explanation: “However, let’s change the subject to Koko, the girl from Natade Village, who appears in A Dangerous Pair!!~. As many people know, her name comes from the highly fashionable desert, nata de coco [coconut milk].” [D6]
Source Spelling:: ナタ・デ・ココ/Nata De Koko
Name Spelling: ココ/Koko

Natade Village
See above.

DBZ Movie 11

Baron Jager Batta
Named for jaga bataa, buttered potato, as well as danshaku-imo, Irish cobbler potato. The joke is that danshaku is Japanese for “baron”, and so this guy is an actual baron. His hideout, Castle May Queen, is named directly after the May Queen potato.
Source Spelling:: じゃがバター/jaga bataa+ 男爵芋/danshaku-imo
Name Spelling: ジャガー・バッタ男爵/Jagaa Batta Danshoku

Doctor Kori, Nain, and Men-Men
Kori and Nain are possibly named for 懲りない/korinai, meaning “obstinate” and generally not learning one’s lesson. Men-men could be from 面々, which can mean people, and so together the 3 would form korinai men-men, “people who never learn”. This seems like an apt description for anyone stupid enough to bring Broli back to life. Furthermore, Baron Batta has a Bubastis-like genetically modified pet named Hei, and so Japanese Wikipedia says that Hei, Kori, Nain, and Men-Men are together specifically a reference to Hei no Naka no Korinai Men-Men, “Stubborn People Inside the Walls”, a novel by Jouji Abe. It seems to fit, but it’s a pretty odd reference for DB.

DBZ Movie 12

Janenba:
Ja means “evil”, nen means “thought”, and ba means “wave”, so together the name means a wave of evil thoughts, like what came out of the Spirits Laundering Machine to form Janenba.
Daizenshuu Explanation:“This is a contraction of ja-aku na nenpa [evil thought waves]. You could call this an appropriate name for a hell beast.” [D10]
Source Spelling:: 邪念な念波/ja-aku na nenpa
Name Spelling: ジャネンバ/Janenba

Psyche Oni [D7]
As his Daizenshuu 7 bio explains, he’s an oni who happens to be a fan of “psychedelic rock”, so his name is a contraction of that.
Source Spelling:: サイケデリックロック/saikederikku rokku
Name Spelling: サイケ鬼/Saike-oni

DBZ Movie 13

Tapion:
A pun on tapioca. In Daizenshuu 6’s character design section, it’s revealed that he was originally going to be flat-out named “Tapioca”, but Toriyama advised them to change the name to something less direct.
Source Spelling:: タピオカ/tapioka
Name Spelling: タピオン/Tapion

Minoshia:
Most likely this is a slightly modified reversal of ヤシの実/yashi no mi, “coconut”, especially since his home planet itself is named “Konats”, an obvious play on coconut. Though in katakana his name ends in an “a” and not a “ya”, interestingly the Jump Anime Collection volume for DBZ movie 13 and other Japanese dodads actually spell his name in alphabet as “Minoshiya”, so it does seem yashi no mi is what they had on their mind. Additionally, “Minoshia” works as a reversal of足のみ/ashi-nomi, “only the legs”, and well as 足の身/ashi-no-mi, “leg section”, both of which suit him.
Source Spelling:: ヤシの実/yashi no mi
Name Spelling: ミノシア/Minoshia

Planet Konats:
From “coconuts”
Source Spelling:: ココナッツ/kokonattsu
Name Spelling: コナッツ星/Konattsu-sei

Hoi:
Not sure on this one. “Hoi” is a phrase that seems to crop up a lot in magic chants, like Uranai Baba’s divination chant or the chant to summon the ghostly fire Hoi-Hoi-Bi. Alternatively, it could come from回鍋肉 (ホイコーロー)/hoikooroo (“hui guo rou” in Chinese), “twice-cooked pork”.
Source (?) Spelling:: 回鍋肉 (ホイコーロー)/hoikooroo
Name Spelling: ホイ/Hoi

Hildegarn
Daizenshuu Explanation: “Then there’s the unusual unique naming, this time for Hildegarn from Dragon Fist Explosion!!~. The entire staff puzzled over what to name this enemy, who gave assistant producer Mr. Sei-ichi Hiruta a shock [the Japanese sound effect for shock is “ga~n”]. That being the case, they used Mr. Hiruta’s name: Mr. Hiruta went “ga~n”, Hiruta-garn, and so Hildegarn…This sounds like a lie, but it’s the truth.” [D6]
Source Spelling:: 蛭田/Hiruta + ガーン/gaan
Name Spelling: ヒルデガーン/Hirudegaan

Plan To Exterminate the Saiyans

Doctor Raichi
From lychee, a subtropical fruit tree. This is the exact same thing the fake Namekian Raichi is named after, though the two characters’ names are spelling slightly differently in Japanese, with the fake Namekian having an extended “i” sound on the end of his name (ライチー/Raichii), which the doctor lacks (ライチ[/i]Raichi[/i]). This makes the doctor’s name be exactly the same as its namesake, while the fake Namekian’s is just slightly different.
Source Spelling:: ライチ/Raichi
Name Spelling: same

Hatchi-Hyack
This probably comes from 八百屋/yaoya, “greengrocer”, a store that specializes in fruits and vegetables. See, the 八百/yao part means “eight hundred”; normally 800 is read as happyaku, but this an alternative reading. 800 in Japanese is shorthand for “a whole lot” (similar to how the number 40 is used throughout the Bible), and ya means “shop”, so in theory a yaoya would be a shop that sells all kinds of stuff, though in practice they focus on fruits and vegetables. Anyway, though together八百 reads as yao or happyaku, apart八 (8) is read as hachi (among other things) while 百 (100) is read as hyaku. You can then see how hachi and hyaku could be altered into “Hatchi-Hyack”, and a greengrocer fits in with the Tsufuru fruit theme very well. Alternatively (or additionally), switch it around and “Hatchi-Hyack” could be a play not on 800 but on 108 (百八/hyaku-hachi), which in Buddhism is the number of worldly thoughts and passions, and pops up a lot in manga and anime as a mystical number.
Source Spelling:: 八百屋/yaoya or百八/hyaku-hachi
Name Spelling: ハッチヒャック/Hacchi-Hyakku

Super Jump Anime Tour Special

Tarble:
Just like his older brother, his name comes from “vegetable”.
Source Spelling:: ベジタブル/bejitaburu
Name Spelling: ターブル/Taaburu

Gure:
Possibly a pun on “grape”, or perhaps also the alien Greys, which she somewhat resembles?
Source Spelling:: グレープ/gureepu or グレー/guree
Name Spelling: グレ/Gure

Abo and Kado:
Taken directly from “avocado”.
Source Spelling:: アボカド/abokado
Name Spelling: アボ/Abo、カド/Kado

Planets

Planet Kanassa
Derived from sakana, Japanese for “fish”.
Source Spelling:: 魚/sakana
Name Spelling: カナッサ星/Kanassa-sei

Planet Meat
From “meat”.
Source Spelling: ミート/miito
Name Spelling: ミート星/Miito-sei

Planet Konats
A pun on “coconut”
Source Spelling:: ココナッツ/kokonattsu
Name Spelling: コナッツ星/Konattsu-sei

Planet Makyo
Written with魔/ma, the kanji for “demon” or “magic”, 凶/kyou, meaning evil or disaster, and 星/sei, planet or star. The place is supposed to be Garlic Jr and co.’s home planet, so it’s supposed to be a planet and not a star, but it’s called “Makyo Star” in the dub.
Name Spelling: 魔凶星/Makyou-sei

Planet Metamor
Derived from metamorphose, meaning a transformation.
Source Spelling: メタモルフォーゼ/metamorufooze
Name Spelling: メタモル星/Metamoru-sei

Planet Litt
A pun on “little”. The home planet of the race which the small fighting suits that Gohan and Kuririn wear were made for. Vegeta fights some of these guys in the Garlic Jr. arc. The planet is called “Lilliput” in the Viz manga.
Source Spelling: リトル/ritoru
Name Spelling: リット星人/Ritto-sei

GT Planets

Planet Imegga [GTPF]
A pun on gametsui, “greedy”, in keeping with the planet’s money theme.
Source Spelling: がめつい/gametsui
Name Spelling: 惑星イメッガ/Wakusei-Imegga

Planet Monmath [GTPF]
From “mammoth”
Source Spelling: マンモス /manmosu
Name Spelling: 惑星モンマース/Wakusei-Monmaasu

Planet Calvo [GTPF]
From “volcano”, the planet’s sole prominent landmark.
Source Spelling: ボルケーノ/borukeeno
Name Spelling: 惑星ケルボ/Wakusei-Kerubo

Planet Bihe [GTPF]
From hebi, “snake”, referring to the snake-like monster that inhabit (well, they really look more like worms, but whatever).
Source Spelling: ヘビ (蛇)/hebi
Name Spelling: 惑星ビーへ/Wakusei-Biihe

Planet Rudeze [GTPF]
This is the planet where Pan tries to run away, so its name comes from deru ze, “I’m leaving!”.
Source Spelling: 出るぜ/deru ze
Name Spelling: 惑星ルーデゼ/Wakusei-Ruudeze

Planet M2 [GTPF]
A contraction of “machine mutant”.
Name Spelling: 惑星M2/Wakusei-Emu Tsuu

Planet Pital [GTPF]
From “hospital”, since it’s a giant hospital.
Source Spelling: ホスピタル/hosupitaru
Name Spelling: 惑星ピタル/Wakusei-Pitaru

Planet Tsufuru: [GTPF]
Like the race itself, this comes from “fruit”.
Source Spelling: フルーツ/furuutsu
Name Spelling: ツフル星/Tsufuru-sei

Places and Things (aka stuff I forgot earlier)

Papaya Island:
Named for the papaya fruit.

Jingle Village
It’s a snowy village, so perhaps “jingle” is a reference to Christmas (“jingle all the way” and all that).

Ginger Town
Named for ginger.

Dorian Airport
Possibly named for the durian fruit, same as Dodoria.

Wukong Hospital
Seemingly named for the monkey king Son Wukong, Goku’s namesake (see Goku’s entry for more details).

Basil Airport and Basil Town
Named for the basil herb.

Randosel Tower
Named after randoseru, “backpack”, the same as the minor town from the manga.

“Aru Village”
The pseudo-name of Oolong’s village, as seen in the anime. Essentially it’s the Japanese equivalent of saying “a village” or “some village”, so it’s not really a proper name.

Parsley Town
From parsley.

Pepper Town
From pepper. Man, towns have really direct names. Did they just use up all their creativity on the characters?

Mount Kiwi
Named for the kiwi fruit, just like Freeza’s good Kyui.

Mountain of the Five Elements
Named for the mountain under which the monkey king was imprisoned for 500 years in Journey to the West.

Mount Frypan
Named after a frying pan. Since it’s hot and all. The mountain is based off of Fire Mountain from Journey to the West.

Mount Frappe
From frappe, like the doctor.

Ryuga Valley
Means “Dragon Fang”. Where Goku first meets Shuu and Mai in the anime.

Urameshiya
A combination of urameshi, the wail of ghosts, and meshiya, “eating house”. Hence it’s a restaurant for ghosts and monsters.

Kinto-un
Paraphrasing Shinobi-03, this is taken straight from Sun Wukong’s cloud-riding technique in Journey to the West. The name is Jin Dou Yun in Chinese and means “summersault cloud”.

Nyoibo
Named after Sun Wukong’s cudgel in Journey to the West. Its name is Riyu Bang in Chinese, and means As-One-Wishes Rod.

Bashosen
Means “banana leaf fan”. It’s based off a similar fan in Journey to the West.

Ajissa Plants
Derived from ajisai, Japanese for hydrangea. They’re the unique trees of Planet Namek. Toriyama says in the SEG that he picked the name because snails like hydrangea plants. In Viz the trees are flat-out called “hydrangea”.
Source Spelling: アジサイ (紫陽花)/ajisai
Name Spelling: アジッサ/ajissa

Katchin Steel
Comes from kachin, the Japanese sound effect for metallic clanging or clanking noises.

Bruits Waves
Probably named after fruit, or maybe “brute”, in that the Oozaru transformation these waves enable is brutish.

Kiri
Probably an anagram of riki, “power”.

Zeni
Comes from 銭/zeni, an colloquial Japanese term for money,
Source Spelling: 銭/zeni
Name Spelling: ゼニー/zenii

PP Candy
Named for how one induces diarrhea in whoever eats them by going “piiiii-piiiii”.

Sasa-Nishiki
Murasaki’s sword. Sasanishiki is a breed of rice.

Dr. Slump Characters

Norimaki Household
Norimaki Arale
Her family name is taken from norimaki, rice wrapped in seaweed. Meanwhile, “Arale” comes from arare, short for arare-mochi, square roasted pieces of mochi flavored with soy sauce or sugar. Norimaki arare, therefore, is arare-mochi wrapped in seaweed.
Source Spelling: 海苔巻き/norimaki + あられ/arare
Name Spelling: 則巻 アラレ/Norimaki Arare

Norimaki Senbei
Named after senbei, thin, flat, rice crackers; norimaki senbee refers to senbei wrapped in seaweed.
Source Spelling: 海苔巻き煎餅/norimaki-senbei
Name Spelling: 則巻千兵衛/Norimaki Senbee

Norimaki Midori
Senbei’s wife, and Arale’s formal teacher. “Midori” means “green”. Her maiden name is “Yamabuki”, taken from a golden yellow Japanese rose. In DB, Gohan describes the color of Goku’s martial arts uniform as the color of this rose.

Norimaki Turbo
Senbei and Midori’s son. Named because of Senbei’s car fixation . In the future, he gets a younger sister named “Nitro”.

Norimaki Gajira
Arale’s angelic companion, who eventually splits into two. Arale names him by combining the names of two famous giant monsters, “Gamera” and “Gojira” (Godzilla).

Soramame Family

Soramame Tarou
Arale’s friend, who wears shades. His family has a bean theme. “Soramame” (literally “sky bean”) is the Japanese name for the broad bean, while “Tarou” is a generic Japanese name for the firstborn son.

Soramame Peasuke
A pun on ピース/piisu, “peas”, and 助/suke, a common element in Japanese given names.

Soramame Kurikinton
Tarou and Peasuke’s rather Clint Eastwood-ish father. “Kurikinton” refers to mashed sweet potatoes sweetened with chestnuts. It’s a regional specialty of the city of Nakatsugawa, in Gifu Prefecture.
Source Spelling: 栗きんとん/kurikinton
Name Spelling: 空豆 クリキントン/Soramame Kurikinto

Soramame Mame
Tarou and Peasuke’s mother, who might not actually appear in DB, now that I think of it. Anyway, her name simply comes from mame, Japanese for “bean” or “pea”.

Tsun Family

Tsun Tsukutsun
Arale’s pseudo-Chinese friend. His name comes from tsutsuku, meaning to poke or prod.

Tsun Tsuntsunodanoteiyuugou
Tsukutsun’s mother. Her name comes from the Tsunoda bike company, who had a popular commercial called “Tsun-Tsun Tsunoda’s T.U. Model”, with “T.U.” being a reference to the first two letters in “Tunoda”, the original alphabet spelling of the company’s name from back when they were first founded.
Source Spelling: つんつんツノダのテーユー(T.U)号/tsun-tsun Tsunoda no Teeyuu gou
Name Spelling: 摘詰角田野廷遊豪 /Tsun Tsuntsunodanoteiyuugou

Others

Kimidori Akane
Arale’s friend. Her family has a color theme running through it. 木/ki means “tree” and 緑/midori means “green”, and is a homonym for黄緑/kimidori, “pea green”, while Akane is a pun on aka, “red”. Her older sister, who appears briefly in DB, is named “Aoi” (blue/green). Their mother is named “Murasaki” (purple), and their father is “Kon” (navy blue).

Obotcha Man
A pun combining obotchama with “man”. Obotchama is a variant on obotchan, a polite term for someone’s son, often used to refer to a son from a wealthy family. It has connotations of said son being sheltered or spoiled, and in this sense is used to refer to Gohan in the title of DBZ’s first episode. Obotcha Man is named this for his extremely prim and proper manner. The character was originally named “Caramel Man No.4”, since he was one of Dr. Mashirito’s series of robots created to beat Arale and/or take over the world (a clear parallel to Gero and his androids). After the character joined Arale and co.’s side, Toriyama asked readers to come up with a new name for him, and “Obotcha Man” was the result.

Suppa Man
A pun on suppai, meaning “sour”, and “Superman”, the name of a certain dickish superhero. Suppa Man’s secret identity is 暗悪健太/Kura’aku Kenta, a pun on Clark Kent. 暗/kura=dark, 悪/aku=evil, and 健太/Kenta is a common Japanese given name.

Nikochan
A green alien who resides in Penguin Village, generally against his will. His name is possibly a reference to the children’s TV program Romper Room, the Japanese version of which featured a “Niko-Chan Balloon”.

Gala & Pagos
Two Penguin Village policemen who appear in the anime. Their names combine to form “Galapagos”, a reference to the Galapagos Islands.
Source Spelling: ガラパゴス諸島/Garapagosu-Shotou
Name Spelling: ガラ, パゴス/Gara, Pagosu

Kurigashira Daigorou
Arale’s big-headed teacher. “Kuri-Gashira” means “chestnut-head”, a reference to his enormous, chestnut-shaped head, while “Daigorou” is a Japanese name meaning “big fifth son”.
Name Spelling: 栗頭 大五郎/Kurigashira Daigorou

Sarada Kinoko
The little girl on the tricycle. “Sarada” is a pun on “salad”, while “Kinoko” means “mushroom”. So in other words it’s a pun on the mushrooms you put in a salad. In keeping with this theme, she has a little sister named “Lettuce”.
Source Spelling: サラダ/sarada + キノコ(茸)/kinoko
Name Spelling: 皿田 きのこ/Sarada Kinoko
Last edited by Herms on Sun Feb 20, 2011 3:44 pm, edited 6 times in total.
Kanzenshuu: Is that place still around?
Sometimes, I tweet things
We might, if they screamed all the time, for no good reason.

User avatar
Hujio
Kanzenshuu Co-Owner & Administrator
Posts: 2456
Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2004 1:28 pm
Location: Nebraska
Contact:

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby Hujio » Fri Mar 12, 2010 4:32 am

Woohoo! I've wanted to do this forever, so I'm glad you're making some headway with it. :D

So get to it people, help is make a new guide!! Look at me, I'm shaking with excitement...
:: [| Heath "Hujio" Cutler |] ::
:: [| Kanzenshuu |] - [| Twitter |] ::

Piccolo Daimaoh
Born 'n Bred Here
Posts: 5397
Joined: Thu Jan 14, 2010 11:49 pm

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby Piccolo Daimaoh » Fri Mar 12, 2010 5:51 am

Whoa! That's dedication.


Dr. Gero might not have a name pun, but "yeros" in Greek can mean old or strong (which are both applicable to Dr. Gero). It's just a coincidence, since Toriyama obviously doesn't know Greek.

User avatar
mysteriousdbzgt
Beyond-the-Beyond Newbie
Posts: 349
Joined: Fri Feb 23, 2007 12:50 pm
Location: United Kingdom, london
Contact:

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby mysteriousdbzgt » Fri Mar 12, 2010 6:17 am

This was so interesting to read, I knew Toriyama used puns on names, but I didn't know he used them on that many! I don't remember there being a character called Jasmine, that's my name!
Last edited by mysteriousdbzgt on Thu Mar 18, 2010 1:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Just another Dragon Ball fangirl in the world.

DB & Tiger and Bunny are my main fandoms, along with many other animes.

Deviantart Profile/ Tiger & Bunnyftw tumblr/ mysteriousdbzgt tumblr

User avatar
SuperSaiyan3Goku
Advanced Regular
Posts: 1455
Joined: Wed Mar 07, 2007 9:14 pm
Location: In the middle of nowhere, across from Planet Vegeta

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby SuperSaiyan3Goku » Fri Mar 12, 2010 6:30 am

Damn, I don't think my brain can handle so many words XD

But I'll give it a read when I get around to it, or when it goes up on Kanzentai. :P
Next quest: ????????????

Fan of Dragon Ball Z and various other Anime since '98! ^^

List of Anime I own or have watched - http://myanimelist.net/animelist/SSJ3Goku

User avatar
Adamant
I Live Here
Posts: 2912
Joined: Wed Jan 21, 2004 1:02 pm
Location: Viking Land
Contact:

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby Adamant » Fri Mar 12, 2010 8:10 am

Herms wrote:King Cold
Taken straight from the English word “cold”, in keeping with his sons’ icy names. Like Pilaf, his Japanese title is 大王/daiou, meaning “great king’, and used for such people as Alexander the Great and King Kamehameha I.
Toriyama Explanation: “From the image of a refrigerator, I came up with ‘cold’.” [DBF]
Source Spelling: コルド/Korudo
Name Spelling: same


The word "cold" is written コールド, so like Freeza, he has the extended wovel cut. I like the spelling "Kold", only thing you can really do with his name to distance it from the word.

Herms wrote:Moa
Search me. Who is Moa, anyway?


Green guy who looks like he has an H on his face. Don't remember what role he played, and can't be arsed to watch the movie to check, but there you go.
Satan wrote:Lortedrøm! Bøh slog min datter ihjel! Hvad bilder du dig ind, Bøh?! Nu kommer Super-Satan og rydder op!

User avatar
SHINOBI-03
I Live Here
Posts: 2522
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 7:47 am
Location: United Arab Emirates, Dubai
Contact:

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby SHINOBI-03 » Fri Mar 12, 2010 10:39 am

Love it! But... is it just me, or are we missing the Spice Boys?

Also... it's an honor to have my name mentioned here! ((Although the number is wrong))

Moa
Search me. Who is Moa, anyway?


The guy who got killed by Paragus.
My Dragon Ball Story (500th post)
My Anime List
My Manga List

Big Momma wrote:This is Daizex. There's gonna be complaints and groaning no matter what. ;)

Anime Insider magazine wrote:If police officers in the future dress like prostitutes, then what do prostitutes in the future wear?

User avatar
Drabaz
Advanced Regular
Posts: 1101
Joined: Tue Jul 25, 2006 7:49 pm
Location: Maryland
Contact:

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby Drabaz » Fri Mar 12, 2010 2:11 pm

In the first episode of Dragonball Z, before we meet Gohan for the first time, we see Chi-Chi calling for Gohan. Are we suposed to think that she's yelling for Goku by calling out "food's ready!"?
My Dragon Ball AMV's:
Pain into Power - Gohan Tribute - Best Character Profile at AnimeNext
The Dragon Ball Life - Original DB only AMV - Coordinators Choice at Anime Conji
When I See You Again [NEW!!!] - Goku & Krillin AMV - Best Drama at Otakon

ChaojiShucaiRen
Newbie
Posts: 49
Joined: Thu Feb 11, 2010 1:05 pm
Location: The Big Pie in the Sky

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby ChaojiShucaiRen » Fri Mar 12, 2010 2:18 pm

Herms wrote:In response to the thread in the questions forum on name puns, I’ve decided to start a thread compiling every known name pun. This is draft one. It’s not proofread at all, isn’t very well organized, and of course isn’t perfectly complete. So I want people to point out who/what is missing or needs expansion/correction. And then eventually the finished version will become a page on Kanzentai or something.

Entries is this guide are generally set up like this:
Character Name:
Pun explanation and whatnot. If there’s a quote from Toriyama or a guidebook that leaves nothing more to add, I’ll quote that and not bother with this. [guide source, if any, are written in brackets]
Toriyama/Daizenshuu explanation: “Quotes from Toriyama or the daizenshuu on the source of the name.”
Source Spelling: The name’s source in Japanese (kanji or katakana or whatever) and Romanized.
Name Spelling: The actual character name in Japanese and Romanized. This way you can directly see what sort of alternations where made to the source to create the name. For names taken directly from the source without any changes (like Piccolo), I’ll just write “sama”.

Sources for Toriyama and daizenshuu name pun confirmation are like this:

[D6]: Daizenshuu 6
[D10]: Daizenshuu 10
[DBF]: DragonBall Forever
[SEG]: Super Exciting Guide: Character Volume
[GTPF]: DragonBall GT Perfect Files Vol.1

Sometimes I’ll cite a guidebook without actually quoting from it, if it’s not really worth giving a full quote.

Well, I think that’s more or less everything. I’m kinda tired, so if I did something stupid I’ll fix it tomorrow.

Goku and FamilySon Goku
The name of the monkey king from the Chinese fantasy novel Journey to the West, which DragonBall is based on to a certain extent. “Son Gokuu” is the Japanese reading of the character’s name, while the Chinese reading is “Son Wokong”. The 悟/go means roughly to understand or to percieve. More importantly, it's used to write the verb satoru (悟る), from which the name of the Buddhist concept of satori derives. 空 can mean sky, empty, or void. It's the kanji for sora, the Japanese word for sky, which you might be familiar with if you're a Kingdom Hearts fan. When it's read as kara, it means 'empty'. When you put these two characters together, you get the meaning of "Percieving the Void", "Aware of Vacuity", or various other translations. In the story of Journey to the West, the monkey king is given this name by a Buddhist sage who he studies under. For a family name, the sage gives him 孫/Son, meaning “grandchild”, because it’s written with the radical for “monkey”.
Toriyama Explanation: “This name was taken completely from that of the protagonist of Journey to the West. This was because I originally planned on him being an actual monkey.” [DBF]
Source Spelling:: 孫悟空/
Name Spelling: 孫悟空 /Son Gokuu




A very small and nitpicky correction, but it should be spelled Sūn Wùkōng.
I’ve got a lovely bunch of Dragonballs
There they are all standing in a row
Big ones, small ones, some as big as your head!

User avatar
Chuquita
Namekian Warrior
Posts: 14109
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2004 2:16 am
Location: New Jersey
Contact:

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby Chuquita » Fri Mar 12, 2010 2:45 pm

This is such an interesting guide! X3
My deviantart : Dragon Ball doodles and comics
My tumblr : Assorted goods and stuff
---
Piccolo: Listen...in the instant he moves to attack...he's open... We'll use that instant...
Vegeta: Good plan. I hope it works.
Piccolo: ...
Vegeta: Don't look at me. You'll miss your instant.
Piccolo: So confident...I hope to see your face when Son Gokû arrives...
Vegeta: Oh? And who's that? Your secret weapon?

User avatar
VegettoEX
Kanzenshuu Co-Owner & Administrator
Posts: 15416
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2004 3:10 pm
Location: New Jersey
Contact:

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby VegettoEX » Fri Mar 12, 2010 2:48 pm

Well, I guess I'll stop pouring info into the previous thread :P.
:: [| Michael "VegettoEX" LaBrie |] ::
:: [| Kanzenshuu |] - [| VegettoEX.com |] ::

User avatar
Adamant
I Live Here
Posts: 2912
Joined: Wed Jan 21, 2004 1:02 pm
Location: Viking Land
Contact:

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby Adamant » Fri Mar 12, 2010 2:50 pm

Drabaz wrote:In the first episode of Dragonball Z, before we meet Gohan for the first time, we see Chi-Chi calling for Gohan. Are we suposed to think that she's yelling for Goku by calling out "food's ready!"?


Not Goku, but Gohan, yes. The line is, from what I remember, "Gohan-chan! Gohan yo!" The first sentence is the character's name, the second is about food.
Satan wrote:Lortedrøm! Bøh slog min datter ihjel! Hvad bilder du dig ind, Bøh?! Nu kommer Super-Satan og rydder op!

User avatar
Tanooki Kuribo
I Live Here
Posts: 4563
Joined: Wed Sep 08, 2004 12:23 am
Location: Brooklyn, New York
Contact:

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby Tanooki Kuribo » Fri Mar 12, 2010 2:57 pm

Wow, how very interesting. Thanks for putting this together.

User avatar
desirecampbell
Moderator
Posts: 4289
Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 9:55 pm
Location: Ontario, Canada
Contact:

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby desirecampbell » Fri Mar 12, 2010 10:22 pm

Adamant wrote:
Drabaz wrote:In the first episode of Dragonball Z, before we meet Gohan for the first time, we see Chi-Chi calling for Gohan. Are we suposed to think that she's yelling for Goku by calling out "food's ready!"?


Not Goku, but Gohan, yes. The line is, from what I remember, "Gohan-chan! Gohan yo!" The first sentence is the character's name, the second is about food.


"Gohan" literally means rice, but is used as a general term for a meal. That's the joke, that his name is lunch and it's time for lunch. For an English example, a man named William is being handed a slip of paper containing a list of his expenses: "Bill! Bill."

Olivier Hague
I Live Here
Posts: 2171
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 12:09 pm

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby Olivier Hague » Sat Mar 13, 2010 1:01 am

Herms wrote:The kanji mean “Peach White White”, and it’s intended as a pseudo-Chinese name. Accordingly, it’s written in kanji (桃白白) with a katakana furigana reading (タオパイパイ), indicating that the kanji have a Chinese reading rather than a Japanese one (similar to Shenlong’s name or the names of the dragonballs).

And interestingly (?), the pinyin should really be "Taobaibai". The "strong" Chinese "b-" sound is often rendered as a "p-" sound in Japanese, hence the "taopaipai" kana. But I guess we're all used to spell the name as "Taopaipai" in alphabet (heck, that's also how it's spelled on official Japanese merchandise).
We don't care about "jiaozi" either, now that I think about it... Despite the fact we spell the name of the dragon as "Shenlong" rather than "Shenron", as seen in the Daizenshû and such.

The character’s name is written in kanji (天津飯) with a katakana furigana reading (テンシンハン/Tenshinhan) to indicate that it has a foreign (ie Chinese) reading, although unlike Chaozu, “Tenshinhan” is actually also the normal Japanese reading for the kanji.

Hmm... I actually believe that reading really is the normal Japanese reading (on reading) of the kanji. If that were an actual phonetic reading of the Chinese pronunciation, it would probably be something like "tienchinhan" in kana.
Katakana don't necessarily imply that you're dealing with a phonetic reading of a foreign pronunciation. The main characters of Saint Seiya, for example, all have their names written in kanji with the pronunciation in katakana besides them, and they're all Japanese names.

Name Spelling: ジャッキー・チュン /Jakki Chun

'Should be "Jakkii".

Source Spelling: イレイサー/ereisaa
Name Spelling: イレーザ/Ereeza

'Should be "ireisaa" and "ireeza".

Source Spelling: ジャスミン茶/Jazumin-cha

'Should be "jasumin-cha".

How sloppy!

(nah! great job, Herms, as usual!)

User avatar
linkdude20002001
I Live Here
Posts: 2289
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2005 4:22 pm
Location: Lynnwood, Washington
Contact:

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby linkdude20002001 » Sat Mar 13, 2010 4:21 am

Pan: Isn't the French word for bread "pan", not "pain"?
Vegeta: it should be "his name", not "he ".
Bardock: messed up URL.

User avatar
Herms
Kanzenshuu Co-Owner & Administrator
Posts: 10527
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 6:40 pm
Location: Jupiter
Contact:

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby Herms » Sat Mar 13, 2010 4:39 am

Adamant wrote:The word "cold" is written コールド, so like Freeza, he has the extended wovel cut. I like the spelling "Kold", only thing you can really do with his name to distance it from the word.

D'oh! Thanks for pointing that out, I apparently didn't look closely enough at how the word was spelled in Cold's DB Forever name pun entry. Fixed now.

Adamant wrote:Green guy who looks like he has an H on his face. Don't remember what role he played, and can't be arsed to watch the movie to check, but there you go.

Ah, thanks. Though I still can't think of what his name could be a pun on. Well, whatever.

SHINOBI-03 wrote:Love it! But... is it just me, or are we missing the Spice Boys?

By George, you’re right! Here they are:

The Four Heavenly Kings of the Demon Realm
The title for Garlic Jr.’s four henchmen from his filler arc. The term “Four Heavenly Kings” (四天王/shiten-nou in Japanese) originally referred to four Buddhist gods who guarded over the cardinal directions, similar to the Kaios in DB. The term has come to be commonly used for any group of 4 people famous in a particular field (Hironobu Kageyama, for instance, is sometimes counted as one of the shiten-nou of anime songs). It’s also often used for groups of 4 boss characters in manga, anime, or video games. The term pops up in Pokemon (as the Japanese name for the Elite 4), Sailor Moon (as generals of the Dark Kingdom), Kinnikuman (for Kinnikuman Zebra’s team), Toriko (used for the top 4 gourmets), and lots more. So these guys are like that, only for Garlic Jr.’s Demon Clan.

Vinegar
Named directly after vinegar.
Source Spelling:: ビネガー/binegaa
Name Spelling: same

Gashew
Named for sugar.
Source Spelling:: シュガー/shugaa
Name Spelling: ガッシュ/Gasshu

Zard
Named for salt.
Source Spelling:: ソルト/soruto
Name Spelling: ゾルド/Zorudo

Tard
Named for mustard.
Source Spelling:: マスタード/masutaado
Name Spelling: タード/Taado

="SHINOBI-03"]Also... it's an honor to have my name mentioned here! ((Although the number is wrong))

Whoops, sorry. I’ll go fix that. Incidentally, would it be OK if I just quoted in full the stuff you wrote awhile back on the Nyoibo and other Journey to the West-derived stuff? Oh, and I thought I heard somewhere that Toninjinka was named after some demon from Journey to the West. Is that true?

ChaojiShucaiRen wrote:A very small and nitpicky correction, but it should be spelled Sūn Wùkōng.

Ah, thanks. One of these days I really need to learn how to type diacritical marks like that.

VegettoEX wrote:Well, I guess I'll stop pouring info into the previous thread :P.

Huh, I didn’t realize you were continuing to update your post in that thread. I was originally going to just post all this in that previous thread, but my notes ended up being so long, and it seemed that the previous thread had died down, so I decided to start this new thread.

Olivier Hague wrote:And interestingly (?), the pinyin should really be "Taobaibai". The "strong" Chinese "b-" sound is often rendered as a "p-" sound in Japanese, hence the "taopaipai" kana. But I guess we're all used to spell the name as "Taopaipai" in alphabet (heck, that's also how it's spelled on official Japanese merchandise).
We don't care about "jiaozi" either, now that I think about it... Despite the fact we spell the name of the dragon as "Shenlong" rather than "Shenron", as seen in the Daizenshû and such.

Yeah, I’m completely inconsistent with how I deal with the Chinese/pseudo-Chinese character names, largely due to my unfamiliarity with Chinese.

Olivier Hague] Hmm... I actually believe that reading really is the normal Japanese reading (on reading) of the kanji. If that were an actual phonetic reading of the Chinese pronunciation, it would probably be something like "tienchinhan" in kana.
Katakana don't necessarily imply that you're dealing with a phonetic reading of a foreign pronunciation. The main characters of Saint Seiya, for example, all have their names written in kanji with the pronunciation in katakana besides them, and they're all Japanese names. [/quote]
Yeah, I wasn’t sure about that part. Tenshinhan seemed to be the ordinary Japanese reading, but the katakana threw me off, and I didn’t know what the Chinese reading would be. Thanks for clearing that up.

Thanks for pointing out those other little screw-ups too. I’ll get those fixed.

[quote="linkdude20002001 wrote:
Pan: Isn't the French word for bread "pan", not "pain"?

I’m no French expert, but I got “pain” off of French Wikipedia.

Vegeta: it should be "his name", not "he ".
Bardock: messed up URL.

Fixed now.
Kanzenshuu: Is that place still around?
Sometimes, I tweet things
We might, if they screamed all the time, for no good reason.

User avatar
SHINOBI-03
I Live Here
Posts: 2522
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 7:47 am
Location: United Arab Emirates, Dubai
Contact:

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby SHINOBI-03 » Sat Mar 13, 2010 5:21 am

Herms wrote:
SHINOBI-03 wrote:Also... it's an honor to have my name mentioned here! ((Although the number is wrong))

Whoops, sorry. I’ll go fix that. Incidentally, would it be OK if I just quoted in full the stuff you wrote awhile back on the Nyoibo and other Journey to the West-derived stuff? Oh, and I thought I heard somewhere that Toninjinka was named after some demon from Journey to the West. Is that true?


Hmm... I'm not sure... I would recognize the Chinese names, but not their Japanese equivalents... but there was an enemy rabbit spirit who impersonated the Indian princess, and turned out to be the pet rabbit of the moon goddess. Another demon that comes in mind, is Yellow Robe Demon who turned Xuanzang into a tiger, and that reminded me of Toninjinka turning Bulma into a carrot.

It's been some time since I watched or read Xiyouji-related things...!

Oh, and yes, I allow you.
My Dragon Ball Story (500th post)
My Anime List
My Manga List

Big Momma wrote:This is Daizex. There's gonna be complaints and groaning no matter what. ;)

Anime Insider magazine wrote:If police officers in the future dress like prostitutes, then what do prostitutes in the future wear?

User avatar
linkdude20002001
I Live Here
Posts: 2289
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2005 4:22 pm
Location: Lynnwood, Washington
Contact:

Re: Name Pun Round-up

Postby linkdude20002001 » Sat Mar 13, 2010 5:45 am

-You forgot the katakana for Cold's name.
-ジース/Jiisu would be Jheese in English, right? And not Jheeze?

You're probably right about the "pan" thing. Someone told me it was French for bread, but they were probably just confused.


Return to “General Franchise Discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: 8000 Saiyan, BlueBasilisk, rereboy, Robo4900, VDenter and 20 guests