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Published by VegettoEX
29 November 2021, 10:28 AM ESTComment

Each month, Toyotarō provides a drawing of a Dragon Ball character — as well as an accompanying comment — on the official Japanese Dragon Ball website. Following up on the wealth of characters already drawn, for his November 2021 entry, Toyotarō has contributed a drawing of Resident Number TKM118755 Bulma:

Resident Number TKM118755 Bulma

One of only three people named Bulma in West City. She only appears in one panel and only her face is shown, so I designed her clothes based on the other residents. I wonder what kind of person the remaining Bulma is…?

The character originates in Dragon Ball chapter 68, where after a series of unfortunate events for everyone that Goku runs into in West City, our hero eventually asks a policeman where his friend Bulma lives. It turns out there are actually a few people named “Bulma” living in West City, but the second one that they look up on the policeman’s computer — the daughter of the owner of Capsule Corporation! — is the correct one.

This drawing and comment set has been added to the respective page in our “Translations” archive.

Published by VegettoEX
29 November 2021, 10:00 AM ESTComment

The September 2021 issue of Shueisha’s Saikyō Jump magazine kicked off a new “Dragon Ball Super Gallery” series in commemoration of the Dragon Ball franchise’s upcoming 40th anniversary. The new celebration aims to have different artists all contribute their own spin on the original 42 tankōbon covers, with the images and an accompanying comment published as part of the magazine.

Following the previous three entries, this month’s December 2021 issue brings us Ryūhei Tamura (Beelzebub, Hard-Boiled Cop and Dolphin) and his take on the series’ 38th volume cover:

Tamura commented:

Congratulations to Dragon Ball on its 40th anniversary! The first time I saw Goku’s sons, I thought they were so unbelievably cute that I drew them like crazy. I love both Gohan and Goten. Being reminded once again that that was where my passion for drawing children came from, I chose to redraw the cover to volume 38. I am so honored to have gotten the chance to participate in this project!!

Saikyō Jump is currently a monthly magazine published in Japan by Shueisha under the “Jump” line of magazines. The magazine began as a quarterly publication in 2012, went monthly in 2013, went bimonthly in late-2014, and returned to a monthly format this fall (including a digital release for the first time). The magazine’s focus is spin-off and supplementary manga series aimed at a young audience, while also including game promotions, news coverage, and more. The magazine currently serializes content such as Yoshitaka Nagayama’s Super Dragon Ball Heroes: Big Bang Mission!!! and the Dragon Ball GT Anime Comic. For calendar year 2019, Shueisha reported Saikyō Jump‘s circulation down at 130,000, with readership as 58.5% upper elementary school, 28% lower middle school, 11% middle school, and 2.5% high school or older.

Published by VegettoEX
24 November 2021, 11:41 AM ESTComment

Bandai Namco has announced that the closed beta for the forthcoming Dragon Ball: The Breakers video game will be held next weekend (03 December to 05 December 2021 depending on / according to local time zones), exclusively on the PC via Steam. Registrations are required for the closed beta (separate sign-up links are available for Japan, Europe and North America), with registrations closing next Tuesday, 30 November 2021, and selected users being notified ahead of the beta timeframe.

Alongside the closed beta details, Bandai Namco shared a combination “Closed Beta Test Trailer” and “Game Systems Overview” trailer:

Developed by Dimps, Dragon Ball: The Breakers puts a small group of seven survivors up against a “raider” in an asymmetrical race to survive. Currently scheduled for release some time in 2022, The Breakers will release on the Sony PlayStation 4 (also playable on PlayStation 5), Microsoft Xbox One (also playable on Series S|X), Nintendo Switch, and the PC via Steam. The game will be released an an “accessible pricing” and shares a world with Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2.

Published by Hujio
19 November 2021, 1:40 PM ESTComment

Continuing onward from previous chapters, Shueisha and Viz have added the official English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s seventy-eighth chapter to their respective Manga Plus and Shonen Jump services, continuing the brand-new “Granolla the Survivor arc”. Alongside other initiatives including free chapters and a larger archive for paid subscribers, this release continues the companies’ schedule of not simply simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut to the release date, but to its local time in Japan alongside its serialization in today’s January 2022 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ seventy-eighth chapter coming today in the magazine’s January 2022 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” and “Granolla the Survivor” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. The fifteenth collected volume is due out in January 2022.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set last year.

Published by Hujio
19 November 2021, 12:59 PM ESTComment

The Dragon Ball Official Site has announced the roster of voice actors scheduled for this years Dragon Ball Super panel at Jump Festa ’22, which will be held at the Makuhari Messe convention center in Chiba, Japan between December 18th and 19th. After last year’s event was held virtually due to the pandemic, this year’s Jump Festa will feature in-person programs which will also be simultaneously streamed online.

The Dragon Ball Super panel is scheduled for 4:20 PM JST (2:20 AM EST) on the Jump “Super Stage” and will feature voice actors Masako Nozawa (Son Goku) and Toshio Furukawa (Piccolo), with Nozawa attending remotely. Joining them will be the yet-to-be-announced voice actors for the characters Gamma 1 and Gamma 2, set to debut in the upcoming Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero movie, who will officially be revealed at the event.

The story, script, and character designs for Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero are being crafted by original manga author Akira Toriyama. Shueisha’s executive producer Akio Iyoku has noted that the movie’s story will take place after the events in Dragon Ball Super: Broly, but before the 28th Tenka’ichi Budōkai, and feature the revival of an old foe. The movie’s main staff and cast have yet to be revealed, but it has been noted that the Japanese cast recorded their lines in early October 2021 and the movie itself is being produced almost exclusively with CG. The movie is currently slated for release in Japan sometime in 2022, with no definitive release date set at this time.

Published by VegettoEX
16 November 2021, 4:52 PM ESTComment

Bandai Namco has announced Dragon Ball: The Breakers, an “Asymmetric Online Multiplayer Survival Coop” video game developed by Dimps set for release in 2022 for the PC, Sony PlayStation 4, Microsoft Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch.

Alongside official posts and press articles in Japanese, an official English-language website for the game is open at:

www.bandainamcoent.com/games/dragon-ball-the-breakers

Developed by Dimps, Dragon Ball: The Breakers — widely being compared to the 2016 game Dead by Daylight — puts a small group of survivors up against a “raider” such as Freeza, Cell, or Boo in a quest to do just that: survive. The game will see a closed beta on PC prior to release.

BANDAI NAMCO ENTERTAINMENT AMERICA INC. UNVEILS DRAGON BALL: THE BREAKERS; A NEW SURVIVAL ACTION EXPERIENCE SET IN THE DRAGON BALL UNIVERSE
In the Temporal Seam, No One Can Hear Your Screams

SANTA CLARA, Calif., (November 16, 2021) – Leading video game publisher and developer BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment America Inc. today announced DRAGON BALL: THE BREAKERS which is scheduled to release in the Americas for PlayStation®4, PlayStation®5 (Compatible), Xbox One, Xbox Series X|S (Compatible), Nintendo Switch, and PCs via STEAM® in 2022. DRAGON BALL: THE BREAKERS is an eight-person online multiplayer game that combines both cooperative and competitive dynamics to create a revolutionary asymmetrical online survival action experience set in the DRAGON BALL XENOVERSE universe. A Closed Beta Test will be organized on PC, enabling players to get their hands on the game. More details regarding Closed Beta Test registration will be shared soon.

DRAGON BALL: THE BREAKERS consists of 7v1 matches where seven normal “Survivors” have been sucked into a mysterious phenomenon called the “Temporal Seam” and must contend with the overwhelming power of the eighth player, the franchise iconic rival “Raider,” whose task is to obliterate the Survivor team. The Survivors don’t have any superpowers and must rely on various power-up items, weapons, and pilotable vehicles to battle and evade the Raider while searching for the Super Time Machine to escape oblivion. Concurrently, the Raider will be able to play as Cell, Buu, or Frieza and amass overwhelming power to destroy the Survivor team throughout the match, ensuring complete dominance.

DRAGON BALL: THE BREAKERS also features a Survivor character customization mode which enables players to design their match avatars by using familiar DRAGON BALL Survivor skins and decorative equipment earned with in-game credits or via optional in-game purchases. Additionally, DRAGON BALL: THE BREAKERS will link save data with DRAGON BALL XENOVERSE 2. Stay tuned for more updates in the future.

“The DRAGON BALL series has been a global fan favorite for over 37 years and DRAGON BALL: THE BREAKERS takes the classic over-the-top action formula and offers an innovative twist with its online survival gameplay,” said Lin Leng, Senior Director of Brand Marketing at BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment America Inc. “Both new players and long-time fans can expect an extremely fun and engaging experience; whether playing as a Raider hunting down fellow gamers or as a Survivor, playing cooperatively to team-up against an iconic rival.”

Steeped in a wealth of DRAGON BALL lore and featuring innovative survival action gameplay, DRAGON BALL: THE BREAKERS will be available in the Americas for purchase digitally and at brick & mortar retailers for PlayStation®4, PlayStation®5 (Compatible), Xbox One, Xbox Series X|S (Compatible), Nintendo Switch, and PCs via STEAM® in 2022. For information on this and other products from BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment America Inc., please visit www.bandainamcoent.com or follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/BandaiNamcoUS, or join the conversation on Twitter at https://www.twitter.com/BandaiNamcoUS

Alongside similar information in the game’s press release, a video from producer Ryosuke Hara notes that the game will be released an an “accessible pricing” and that it shares a world with the company’s existing Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2 video game, with plans for linking save data between the two games.

Bandai Namco is currently supporting a range of Dragon Ball video games across various consoles and gaming devices, including three major console titles (Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2, Dragon Ball FighterZ, Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot), two major mobile titles (Dragon Ball: Dokkan Battle, Dragon Ball Legends), as well as the Dragon Ball Heroes franchise largely exclusive to Japan (which is currently celebrating its 11th anniversary). The company recently announced that Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2 and Dragon Ball FighterZ have sold 8 million copies.

Published by VegettoEX
10 November 2021, 2:08 PM ESTComment

Bandai Namco Holdings has posted a ¥39.527 billion (approximately $347 million) profit for the first half of fiscal year 2022, compared to a ¥31.715 billion profit at this same point last year.

namco_bandai_logo_resaved

Dragon Ball remains the company’s best-performing franchise, pulling in ¥61.2 billion this half fiscal year (a slight drop from ¥63 billion at this point last year), though the company is projecting a full fiscal year total of ¥133.5 billion, up from last full fiscal year’s ¥127.4 billion.

In terms of general toys and hobby merchandise (non-video games), the franchise grew from ¥7.4 billion last fiscal half-year to ¥10.1 billion this half-year, with a projected full year jump from ¥15.4 billion last year to ¥17 billion this year.

Published by VegettoEX
08 November 2021, 9:15 AM ESTComment

Viz is set to slowly dish out additional collected volumes of the Dragon Ball Super manga over the course of 2022, with two volumes currently announced for next year.

Volume 15, covering chapters 65-68, is due out 04 January 2022 for $9.99 in print (with a digital version also coming alongside it). These chapters comprise the end of the “Galactic Patrol Prisoner arc” and kick-off the (currently ongoing) “Granolla the Survivor” arc:

Goku finally manages to activate the complete version of Ultra Instinct, and he’s got Moro on the ropes. However, Moro has one more trick up his sleeve… Having stocked Merus’s Ultra Instinct, Moro is about to give Goku a taste of his own medicine! Can Goku win against another user of that divine power?!

Volume 16, covering chapters 69-72, is due out 02 August 2022 for $9.99 in print (with a digital version also coming alongside it), moving onward into the “Granolla the Survivor” arc:

Granolah is the last Cerealian, a people who were wiped out by the Saiyans and Freeza’s army many years ago. When he finds out that the observatory on his planet has found the long-lost twin to the pair of Dragon Balls from planet Cereal that the old Namekian Monaito keeps in their home, Granolah steals it and makes a wish that will allow him to start his quest for revenge against the Saiyans—to become the strongest being in the whole universe! Meanwhile, the Heeters work behind the scenes to put Granolah out of his misery once and for all…by enlisting Goku and Vegeta’s help!

Both Volume 15 and Volume 16 are available for pre-order at Amazon.

Viz is also on tap to release “Akira Toriyama’s Manga Theater” next month, a compilation of the three volumes in the Akira Toriyama’s _____piece Theater (鳥山明○作劇場; Toriyama Akira Marusaku Gekijō) series, themselves collections of various Akira Toriyama one-shots and short series.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ seventy-eighth chapter coming later this month in the magazine’s January 2021 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” and “Granolla the Survivor” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. Japan is set to receive its seventeenth collected volume next month.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set last year.

Published by VegettoEX
03 November 2021, 12:41 PM EDTComment

With the release of Dragon Ball Super manga chapter 77, Bardock — “Burdock” if you rather… or, heck, even “Barduck” — is back in the fandom chatter all over again.

This isn’t actually about how you spell the character’s name, though — that’s another story for another time! For now, let’s talk about titles.

Dragon Ball Super manga chapter 77 is titled 悟空の父 バーダック in Japanese, rendered in Viz’s official English translation as “Bardock, Father of Goku”. That English title might sound a little familiar. Is it just a coincidence?

Furigana

A quick crash course on furigana may be necessary here:

Little hiragana or katakana characters above kanji are meant to act as a pronunciation guide, particularly for younger readers and learners. These are especially helpful for kanji that may have different readings. In the case of many Dragon Ball phrases, furigana is commonly used for: (1) indicating a Chinese versus Japanese pronunciation [see: the Dragon Balls themselves having Chinese pronunciations], or (2) providing an alternate reading for a word that has the same meaning.

This second case is used so often in Dragon Ball that you may not even realize it: “Super Saiyan” is actually written as 超サイヤ人, which might normally be read in Japanese as Chō Saiya-jin… but the スーパー (sūpā) furigana consistently written above tells us to read it as the English word “super”!

(This phrasing is played with, such as in the closing theme to Dragon Ball Z movie 13, which uses the phrase “Chō Saiya-jin pawā!“)

The TV Special Title: Japanese

The the original 1990 Dragon Ball Z television special title seems pretty straight forward at first:

That’s たったひとりの最終決戦〜フリーザに挑んだZ戦士 孫悟空の父〜 or “A Final, Solitary Battle: The Father of Z-Warrior Son Goku, Who Challenged Freeza”…

…except that’s not exactly it.

When read aloud in its next-episode preview, Masako Nozawa (in-character as Goku) reads that final section — which isn’t actually present on-screen in text in this preview — aloud not as “Son Gokū no Chichi” (“Son Goku’s Father”), but as “Kakarotto no Chichi” (“Kakarrot’s Father”).

This additional reading is backed up by newly-added furigana in things like its Daizenshuu 6: Movies & TV Specials entry, as well as the special’s own anime comic release.

This is why our own guides list a romanization of Kakarotto for 孫悟空 in this particular instance rather than Son Gokū:

The TV Special Title: FUNimation

When FUNimation brought the Bardock television special stateside — first on VHS in November 2000, then bilingual on DVD in January 2001 — it received a fairly simplified title of: Bardock — The Father of Goku

Concise, easy to remember, rolls off the tongue nicely. It’s even a nice simplification of the second half of the Japanese title in a way, just prefacing “Bardock” in there where his actual name wasn’t originally there.

The Dragon Ball Super Manga Chapter Title

This brings us back to the Dragon Ball Super manga chapter and any possible reference it may have. In Japanese, the chapter 77 title is:

悟空ごくうちち バーダック

There is indeed furigana atop some of the kanji, guiding us to a full pronunciation of Gokū no Chichi Bādakku. There’s a space between that first part and second part, which we could adapt in a few ways, such as with a comma or a semi-colon depending on how you want to order the possessive. A pretty standard and straightforward translation of this might be “Goku’s Father, Bardock” or “Goku’s Father: Bardock”. You could even flip the order to “Bardock, Goku’s Father” and maintain the same meaning; Viz went with “Bardock, Father of Goku” in this same vein.

So Is That A Reference To Anything?

The manga chapter title could be a reference to the original 1990 Japanese television special: 悟空の父 from the chapter title (dropping the surname) is the exact same set of characters from the anime special. Unlike with the special’s title, the furigana above the character’s name here in the chapter title guides us to directly say the more obvious “Goku” rather than the original Saiyan name of “Kakarrot”.

It is also worth asking whether or not the chapter title in Japanese is a reference to FUNimation’s English title. It seems like a stretch: would Toyotarō even be aware of that English-language title, nevermind feel the need to directly backward-reference it in Japanese? Perhaps surprisingly, Toyotarō — under his old pen-name “Toyble” in the Dragon Ball AF days — penned a blog post in 2006 where he shared his experience importing FUNimation’s DVD of the Bardock special, which at that time was not yet available separately in Japan! (After its inclusion in the first Dragon Ball Z Dragon Box in 2003, the Bardock TV special would see a stand-alone DVD release with the Trunks TV special as the “Special Selection DVD” in 2011.)

This, of course, does not actually prove anything any which way as being an intentional reference or not, but it certainly increases the probability.

As for Viz’s specific title verbiage choice, it could certainly be a reference back to FUNimation’s title for the 1990 television special, particularly with the way it rearranges Bardock’s name to be first followed by the specific phrasing “Father of Goku” (rather than, say, “Goku’s Father”). Loathe as we may be at times to want to assign the word “iconic” to anything out of an international localization, “Bardock — The Father of Goku” is a fairly solid and memorable title, and one worth referencing if the glove fits.

The manga chapter title is also incredibly basic and could be a simple statement, devoid of any deeper meaning or intentional reference. (But that’s no fun!)

And hey, if you think the Bardock title history is interesting, you’re not going to believe where the title “The History of Trunks” actually came from


(NOTE: We were disappointed to see Viz change their established “Burdock” spelling to “Bardock” last month in the Dragon Ball Super manga digital simulpub, which carried forward to chapter 77 this month. We are constantly reevaluating our house style guide, and have made waves of changes over the years both preceding our fusion — back in the separate Daizenshuu EX and Kanzentai days — and following it in the current Kanzenshuu era. The “Burdock” spelling has major precedent and is more in line with the pun and source word spelling, and as such, may be something we switch to in the future.)

Published by VegettoEX
02 November 2021, 9:54 AM EDTComment

If you’re a regular reader of Kanzenshuu, you likely know all the intricacies of release dates for Shueisha publications: Weekly Shōnen Jump comes out each Monday, V-Jump comes out on the 21st of each month (barring a Sunday or holiday, in which case it gets moved up), and Saikyō Jump now comes out on the 4th of each month.

Things were a little more obfuscated back during Dragon Ball‘s original serialization, however, as the date printed on the cover of each Weekly Shōnen Jump was not the actual date the issue went on sale!

In this fun Twitter thread, join us for a quick tour as we answer a reader’s question about when Vegeta first appeared in the manga — you’re bound to learn something new!