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3,647 Posts & 2,320 Pages Documenting Dragon Ball, since 1998. We've got you covered!
Published by 29 January 2023, 2:41 PM ESTComment

SHOW DESCRIPTION:

Episode #0497! Mike, Ken, and Randy reconvene once again to review the “Bardock: Alone Against Fate” DLC pack for “Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot”! How does the second season pass kick things off this time around, and how does it compare to content from the first season pass?

REFERENCED SITES:

Our podcast is available via Apple Podcasts and/or Google Podcasts, or you can pop the direct RSS feed into the program of your choice. You can also listen to this episode by directly downloading the MP3 or by streaming it on Spotify, SoundCloud, or YouTube. We invite you to discuss this episode on our forum.

Published by 24 January 2023, 10:37 AM ESTComment

Each month, Toyotarō provides a drawing of a Dragon Ball character — as well as an accompanying comment — on the official Japanese Dragon Ball website. Following up on the wealth of characters already drawn, for his January 2023 entry, Toyotarō has contributed a drawing of Hire Dragon:

Hire Dragon

This is how I imagine it all grown up. I hope it’s still living happily on Mount Pao-tzu.

Hire Dragon debuted in the third Dragon Ball Z film back in 1990 (A Super Decisive Battle for Earth), and subsequently appeared in both the next two films as well as the Garlic Jr. “filler arc” of the Dragon Ball Z television series.

This drawing and comment set has been added to the respective page in our “Translations” archive.

Published by 22 January 2023, 3:31 PM ESTComment

The ninth collected volume of Dragon Ball SD is on its way from Shueisha, with a catalog entry noting an 03 March 2023 release date, clocking in at 192 pages and running at ¥748 + tax.

The release will mark just under a year since the eighth collected volume. The ninth collected volume should pick up from Piccolo’s battle with Freeza in Dragon Ball SD chapter 79.

Dragon Ball SD was a stalwart of Saikyō Jump dating back to its original debut issue, adapting events from the original story in humorous new ways with “chibi” or “super deformed” (the titular “SD”) styled characters. After the original four quarterly issues of the magazine and SD covering four distinct time periods, the magazine shifted to a monthly release and SD reverted back to the proper beginning of the series with a continuous storyline. In 2016, the series skipped ahead from the end of the 22nd Tenka’ichi Budōkai to the Saiyan arc. In conjunction with Saikyō Jump‘s big format refresh in 2021, Dragon Ball SD was moved out of the magazine to a digital-only series on the company’s official YouTube channel; the series briefly returned to print in the August 2022 issue for a special chapter promoting the theatrical film Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero.

Dragon Ball SD is not available in English, though it does currently see a release in certain territories such as Germany and France.

Published by 21 January 2023, 12:09 PM ESTComment

Shueisha and online retailers have listed the twentieth collected volume of the Dragon Ball Super manga series by Toyotarō as releasing 03 March 2023 in Japan for ¥528 + tax.

Following most previous volumes, the upcoming 20th volume should be set to include four Dragon Ball Super manga chapters, spanning chapter 85-88 — this would complete the collection of the “Granolla the Survivor arc” and head one chapter into the new/ongoing “Super Hero arc”, the first chapter of which was serialized last month. The volume is listed as spanning 208 pages, up slightly over the usual 192 pages, no doubt due to the extended page count of the aforementioned first “Super Hero arc” chapter.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ eighty-ninth chapter coming today in the magazine’s March 2023 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner”, “Granolla the Survivor”, and now “Super Hero” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017; the company’s eighteenth collected volume is due out in June 2023.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. Crunchyroll (by way of the merger with FUNimation) owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set in 2020. A complete steelbook “Limited Edition” was released by Crunchyroll this past September.

Published by 19 January 2023, 11:07 AM ESTComment

Following up on its return to serialization last month, Shueisha and Viz have added the official English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s eighty-ninth chapter to their respective Manga Plus and Shonen Jump services, continuing onward into the brand-new “Super Hero arc”. Alongside other initiatives including free chapters and a larger archive for paid subscribers, this release continues the companies’ schedule of not simply simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut to the release date, but to its local time in Japan alongside its serialization in today’s March 2023 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ eighty-ninth chapter coming today in the magazine’s March 2023 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner”, “Granolla the Survivor”, and now “Super Hero” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017; the company’s eighteenth collected volume is due out in June 2023.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. Crunchyroll (by way of the merger with FUNimation) owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set in 2020. A complete steelbook “Limited Edition” was released by Crunchyroll this past September.

Published by 16 January 2023, 4:53 PM ESTComment

SHOW DESCRIPTION:

Episode #0496! Mike and Ken look ahead to the rest of 2023 for the Dragon Ball franchise. What do we know is on the horizon, and how do we think several of the ongoing productions we DO know about will shake out? Tune in for our thoughts, as well as our reactions to YOUR thoughts!

REFERENCED SITES:

Our podcast is available via Apple Podcasts and/or Google Podcasts, or you can pop the direct RSS feed into the program of your choice. You can also listen to this episode by directly downloading the MP3 or by streaming it on Spotify, SoundCloud, or YouTube. We invite you to discuss this episode on our forum.

Published by 11 January 2023, 4:57 PM EST1 Comment

The “Launch Trailer” for this week’s “Bardock: Alone Against Fate” downloadable content pack for Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot concludes with a brief tease at future content: specifically that of the 23rd Tenka’ichi Budōkai.

Taking place immediately before what the television series designated as the “Z” break (in what is otherwise simply “Dragon Ball” beginning to end in its original comic form), the 23rd Tenka’ichi Budōkai sees a freshly-grown Son Goku at his third tournament appearance taking on the reincarnated/reborn-but-also-offspring (it’s complicated…) of the original Demon King Piccolo.

The first entry in the second wave of DLC packs for Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot launches this week alongside new, native PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X|S versions of the full game. The upcoming three entries in this second “season pass” are all “story arcs” rather than “story episodes”; in the first season pass, the Battle of Gods and Resurrection ‘F’ DLC entries were much shorter with a focus on boss fights and level increases, while the third entry — that of Trunks’ future timeline — told a comprehensive, multi-part story.

Developed by CyberConnect2 for Bandai Namco, the action role-playing game released 16 January 2020 in Japan and 17 January 2020 internationally on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC (via Steam). A Nintendo Switch edition came later in September 2021.

Published by 11 January 2023, 4:35 PM ESTComment

The September 2021 issue of Shueisha’s Saikyō Jump magazine kicked off a new “Dragon Ball Super Gallery” series in commemoration of the Dragon Ball franchise’s upcoming 40th anniversary. The new celebration aims to have different artists all contribute their own spin on the original 42 tankōbon covers, with the images and an accompanying comment published as part of the magazine.

Following the previous seventeen entries, this month’s February 2023 issue brings us Kentarō Yabuki (Black Cat, To Love Ru) and their take on the series’ 31st volume cover:

Yabuki commented:

I first got into comics by looking at Dragon Ball, studying how to split pages into panels and having fun drawing the adventures of Goku and the gang on my notebook when I was in elementary school. Who would’ve thought that I would be able to enjoy a new comic with Goku’s adventures even in my forties?… And to top it off, that I would be allowed to contribute a drawing of the Artificial Humans that I like so much to this project? I really want to go back and tell all of this to my younger self. Toriyama-sensei, congratulations on Dragon Ball‘s 40th anniversary!

Yabuki has a fascinating and extensive history with Dragon Ball, extending all the way back to 1995 where he won the “Cool Prize” award for his fan fusion contest submission of “Gohanks”… when he was fifteen years old!

Saikyō Jump is currently a monthly magazine published in Japan by Shueisha under the “Jump” line of magazines. The magazine began as a quarterly publication in 2012, went monthly in 2013, went bimonthly in late-2014, and returned to a monthly format last year (including a digital release for the first time). The magazine’s focus is spin-off and supplementary manga series aimed at a young audience, while also including game promotions, news coverage, and more. The magazine currently serializes content such as Yoshitaka Nagayama’s Super Dragon Ball Heroes: Ultra God Mission!!!! manga series, Yūji Kasai’s Super Dragon Ball Heroes: Avatars!! manga series, and the Dragon Ball GT Anime Comic. For calendar year 2019, Shueisha reported Saikyō Jump‘s circulation down at 130,000, with readership as 58.5% upper elementary school, 28% lower middle school, 11% middle school, and 2.5% high school or older.

Published by 27 December 2022, 4:38 PM ESTComment

Following up on the first, second, and third interviews in this series, our latest translation addition continues with material from 2016’s 30th anniversary Super History Book. Here in the fourth in a five-part series of video game-related interviews, we travel back in time to the heyday of the PlayStation 2 era with producer Ryō Mito discussing the Dragon Ball Z: Sparking! game series, known internationally under the “Budokai Tenkaichi” series title.

In this interview, Mito reminisces about starting a new series with a large character roster, as well as the fan reaction of it being a “God-tier game” by the time they reached METEOR, the third game in the series.

Stay tuned in the coming weeks as we make our way fully through this five-part interview series!

Published by 21 December 2022, 8:46 AM ESTComment

Each month, Toyotarō provides a drawing of a Dragon Ball character — as well as an accompanying comment — on the official Japanese Dragon Ball website. Following up on the wealth of characters already drawn, for his December 2022 entry, Toyotarō has contributed a drawing of Tenshinhan using the Shiyō-ken:

Tenshinhan

Using Shiyō-ken

Although he doesn’t get much chance to shine these days, I want to see Tenshinhan get to do his part using techniques like this.

This drawing and comment set has been added to the respective page in our “Translations” archive.