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Published by VegettoEX
30 January 2019, 4:29 PM EDTComment

Bandai Namco has released patch notes for the latest update to Dragon Ball FighterZ:

HEALTH RECOVERY UPON TAKING DAMAGE:
– Reduce the amount of recoverable health when damaged. (Excluding invincible moves)

KI GAUGE:
– Decrease the amount of Ki Gauge gained when receiving damage from Super Attacks and Meteor Attacks, and increase the amount of Ki Gauge gained when receiving damage from other attacks.
– For a short period of time after using the Ki Gauge, the overall amount of Ki Gauge gained is now reduced.

MID-AIR SMASH ATTACK:
– When the condition for a camera change is met, the camera effect will occur regardless of the height of the character’s position now.

INVINCIBLE SPECIAL MOVES:
– Z Assist and Ultimate Z Change will now be unusable during Invincible Special Moves aside from when it hits.

POWERED-UP SPECIAL MOVE:
– Reduce the amount of Recoverable Health when receiving damage from Power-up Special Moves. (Excluding invincible moves)

SUPER ATTACK:
– Reduce the amount of damage dealt when a move other than Ultimate Z Change connects after a Super Attack hits.
– It is now easier to successfully connect Ultimate Z Change after Super Attacks.

ALL METEOR ATTACKS:
– Increased the minimum damage of all Meteor Attacks.

SPARKING!:
– Sparking! can now be used while blocking. (Includes blocking in mid-air)
– While Sparking! is active, reduce the amount of recoverable health of the opponent when damage is dealt to them. (Excluding invincible moves)
– Increased the start up frames of Sparking! aside from when cancelled from an attack.

VANISH MOVE:
– Camera change is easier to occur when cancelled from an attack.

Z-REFLECT:
– You will be invincible to the opponent’s Sparking! activation after a successful Z-Reflect against an opponent’s attack.

ALL THROW MOVES, DRAGON RUSH:
– Specific throw moves and Dragon Rush cannot connect more than once within a combo.

DRAGON RUSH:
– Decreased the amount of Ki gauge gained and damage dealt.
– After a Dragon Rush during mid-combo, camera change will not occur for subsequent hits.

MID-AIR DRAGON RUSH:
– The opponent will ground slide after a mid-air Dragon Rush during a combo.

GUARD CANCEL CHANGE:
– Invincible state will now last until coming into contact or in close vicinity with the opponent.
– Increased the recovery frames and landing recovery frames when blocked.

GROUND BACKSTEP:
– Increase the distance travelled.

SHENRON (REVIVE ALLIES):
– Increased the health of the revived ally.

SHENRON (MAKE ME IMMORTAL):
– Increased the health recovery rate.

GROUND RECOVERY:
– Reduced the collision from mid-air opponent.

DELAYED GROUND RECOVERY:
– Until completely down, you will now be able to perform the different ground recovery options.

DRAMATIC FINISH:
– Vanish Move will also trigger Dramatic Finish now.

The 3-on-3, “2.5D” fighting game is developed by Arc System Works and is currently available on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC (via Steam), and Nintendo Switch. Playable characters include Son Goku, Son Gohan (Cell arc design), Vegeta, Freeza, Cell, Boo (Good), Trunks, Piccolo, Kuririn, #16, #18 (with #17), Yamcha, Tenshinhan (with Chiaotzu), Ginyu (with teammates), Nappa (with Saibaimen), Gotenks, Son Gohan (Boo arc design), Boo (Pure), Hit, Beerus, and Goku Black (with Zamasu), as well as “Super Saiyan God Super Saiyan” (SSGSS, or “Super Saiyan Blue”) versions of Goku and Vegeta that can be accessed early via pre-orders or unlocked through gameplay. The Akira Toriyama-designed “#21” is a new character central to the game’s story mode.

The game’s first (optional) $34.99 “FighterZ Pass” covers eight total additional playable characters (also available individually at $5 each); these include Broli, Bardock, Vegetto, Merged Zamasu, (non-Super Saiyan, “black hair”) Son Goku, and (non-Super Saiyan, “black hair”) Vegeta, Coola, and No. 17.

The game’s recently-revealed “FighterZ Pass 2” is set to include Jiren and Videl this week, with the recent theatrical versions of Broli and Gogeta coming at a later point in time, along with other, unspecified characters.

Dragon Ball FighterZ was originally released 26 January 2018 in North America and Europe, and 01 February 2018 in Japan, with the Switch release coming later in September. Alongside its Japanese release, Bandai Namco announced that they had shipped two million copies of the game, making it the fastest-shipping game in the franchise’s history.

Published by VegettoEX
30 January 2019, 4:11 PM EDTComment

Following the appearance of recent online retailer listings, a new banner across the pre-order page of FUNimation’s online store lists a 16 April 2019 release date for the home video (DVD, Blu-ray, and digital) version of the recent Dragon Ball Super: Broly theatrical film. The film is still screening in theaters internationally, and no Japanese home video release has been announced as of yet.

Ignoring special preview screenings in both the east and west for all of the films, the following overview provides a complete list of theatrical screening and home video release dates for the three major films released since 2013; assuming the April release date for Broly holds true, this would mark the fastest turnaround from a film’s original Japanese theatrical debut to its American home video release:

Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods

  • Japanese (Toei) Theatrical Debut: 30 March 2013
  • Japanese (Toei) Home Video Release: 13 September 2013
  • American (FUNimation) Theatrical Debut: 05 August 2014
  • American (FUNimation) Home Video Release: 07 October 2014

Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection ‘F’

  • Japanese (Toei) Theatrical Debut: 18 April 2015
  • American (FUNimation) Theatrical Debut: 04 August 2015
  • Japanese (Toei) Home Video Release: 07 October 2015
  • American (FUNimation) Home Video Release: 20 October 2015

Dragon Ball Super: Broly

  • Japanese (Toei) Theatrical Debut: 14 December 2018
  • American (FUNimation) Theatrical Debut: 16 January 2019
  • Japanese (Toei) Home Video Release: unknown
  • American (FUNimation) Home Video Release: 16 April 2019
Published by VegettoEX
28 January 2019, 11:05 AM EDTComment

In conjunction with this weekend’s Dragon Ball FighterZ “World Tour Finals: Red Bull Final Summoning” tournament in Los Angeles, and following a brief accidental video post, Bandai Namco formally announced the forthcoming second season of paid downloadable content coming in the form of additional characters.

Videl and Jiren join the cast 31 January 2019, with the latest versions of Broli and Gogeta from the current Dragon Ball Super theatrical film also coming at a later date. The promotional video implies at least two more characters have yet to be revealed.

Jiren has been teased over the last few weeks alongside the forthcoming “Game Project Z” as well as in last week’s March 2018 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine in Japan:

Similar to Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2‘s update last month, Dragon Ball FighterZ is set to include the new version of Broli alongside the original version, who was introduced in the initial season pass last year.

The 3-on-3, “2.5D” fighting game is developed by Arc System Works and is currently available on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC (via Steam), and Nintendo Switch. Playable characters include Son Goku, Son Gohan (Cell arc design), Vegeta, Freeza, Cell, Boo (Good), Trunks, Piccolo, Kuririn, #16, #18 (with #17), Yamcha, Tenshinhan (with Chiaotzu), Ginyu (with teammates), Nappa (with Saibaimen), Gotenks, Son Gohan (Boo arc design), Boo (Pure), Hit, Beerus, and Goku Black (with Zamasu), as well as “Super Saiyan God Super Saiyan” (SSGSS, or “Super Saiyan Blue”) versions of Goku and Vegeta that can be accessed early via pre-orders or unlocked through gameplay. The Akira Toriyama-designed “#21” is a new character central to the game’s story mode.

The game’s first (optional) $34.99 “FighterZ Pass” covers eight total additional playable characters (also available individually at $5 each); these include Broli, Bardock, Vegetto, Merged Zamasu, (non-Super Saiyan, “black hair”) Son Goku, and (non-Super Saiyan, “black hair”) Vegeta, Coola, and No. 17.

Dragon Ball FighterZ was originally released 26 January 2018 in North America and Europe, and 01 February 2018 in Japan, with the Switch release coming later in September. Alongside its Japanese release, Bandai Namco announced that they had shipped two million copies of the game, making it the fastest-shipping game in the franchise’s history.

Published by VegettoEX
25 January 2019, 10:12 AM EDT1 Comment

Toei Animation has acknowledged certain instances of visual censorship in their recent remastered Blu-ray release of Dragon Ball Z‘s 11th and 12th theatrical films from 1994 and 1995, respectively. The acknowledgement comes by way of an apology for the packaging’s descriptive text:

<映像表現上の修正の内容>
本件商品の発売にあたり、皆様により楽しんでいただけるように、また、子どもへ与える影響にも配慮したうえで、映像の確認作業を行いました。映像確認作業の結果、表現上の修正を行った映像を本件商品に収録いたしました。

<ジャケットの記載>
本件商品のジャケットに「この作品には、映像、台詞の一部に、現在では不適当と思われる表現もありますが、作品の歴史的価値を重視し、現存する原版のとおり収録してあります。」という注意文を掲載していました。


-Content of Visual Edits-
Approaching the release of the products in question, so that they could be enjoyed by everyone even more thoroughly, as well as out of consideration for their influence upon children, a review of visual content was conducted. As a result of this review, versions of the films which contained edited expressions were included in the final products.

-Jacket Description-
Jackets of the products in question were printed with the following warning: “Certain parts of images and dialogue may contain material considered inappropriate for modern audiences. However, out of respect for historical value of the works, their original editions are maintained.”

Those wishing to seek a refund are able to fill out the respective form on Toei’s website through January 2020. New jackets with an “accurate” description may also be requested, and new versions printed from today moving forward will have the adjusted text. No mention is made of replacing discs with unaltered content or future re-releases.

In effect, Toei has apologized for the misleading statement on the packaging, rather than the new, otherwise-unannounced censorship in the product itself. These particular scenes remain untouched in the versions currently available for streaming on Amazon Prime and Netflix in Japan, which launched ahead of the Blu-ray release. Additional still-formally-unannounced changes have also been made to certain films, such as digital paint jobs correcting previously-unfinished animation.

Back in November, Toei apologized for an instance of flipped artwork on the back of the third volume’s cover art, offering replacements to consumers.

Three volumes covering the first six Dragon Ball Z films were released in November, followed by three volumes covering the next six Dragon Ball Z films in December, with a final two volumes released earlier this month rounding out the company’s new remastering of the original 17 theatrical films produced during the series’ original serialization.

While no international release of the films’ new remastering has been announced, Toei’s recent limited theatrical run of previous features in America was clearly based on this new print.

The films last saw a home video release in Japan within 2006’s remastered “Dragon Box: The Movies” DVD box set which was subsequently broken out as individual DVD releases over the course of 2008-2009.

Thanks to friends of the site kei17 for the above Piccolo comparison images and Cipher for translations.

Published by VegettoEX
23 January 2019, 10:51 AM EDT4 Comments

A spotlight on various Toei properties by WorldScreen.com appears to reveal and confirm additional episodes of the Dragon Ball Super television series from Toei Animation:

The company is also making more episodes of Dragon Ball Super, a Japanese fantasy martial arts action series in the Dragon Ball media franchise that follows Goku in the aftermath of Majin Buu’s defeat and as God of Destruction Beerus awakens.

The spotlight comes during this week’s National Association of Television Program Executives’ event in Miami. WorldScreen.com has previously reported on various international licensing agreements for the Dragon Ball franchise, such as extensive Latin American deals.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub airing on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its seventh box set this coming April.

Special thanks to @Mendinso on Twitter and everyone else who brought this to our attention.

UPDATE 1: Anime News Network received a curiously-phrased denial from Toei Animation regarding the statement of “more episodes”-

International media news website World Screen posted a spotlight on Toei Animation on Monday and said that the company is “making more episodes of Dragon Ball Super.” However, Toei Animation denied having “mentioned or announced” more episodes of Dragon Ball Super, and told ANN that the report “is not true at this moment.”

UPDATE 2: A “correction” posted to WorldScreen.com this evening states-

Correction: The previously written article contained inaccurate information regarding the production of new Dragon Ball Super episodes. Toei Animation does not plan on producing new television episodes at this time.

Published by VegettoEX
22 January 2019, 9:27 AM EDT1 Comment

Each month, Toyotarō provides a sketch — as well as a brief comment — on the official Japanese Dragon Ball website for a character that has not appeared in Dragon Ball Super. Thus far, Toyotarō has provided sketches of #8, Lunch, Chapa with Oob, Tambourine, Man-Wolf, Tapion, Janenba, Broli, Ozotto, Ginyu, Bardock, Paragus, and King Cold. For his January 2019 entry, Toyotarō has contributed a sketch of Bardock’s crew of Toma, Totapo, Selypa, and Pumbukin from the original television special (with a special tie to this year’s Dragon Ball Super theatrical film):

LEKE: There’s been an order to return home, so Bardock and I are about to head back to Planet Vegeta. What about you guys?

TOMA: A return-home order? Wait just a minute! We haven’t heard anything of the sort.

DODORIA: Heh heh heh… That’s because you’re all about to die right here and now.

NARRATOR: After this, they lost contact with Toma & co… That is the event that caused Bardock’s suspicion of this return-home order to grow ever-stronger.

TOYOTARŌ: It’s Pumbukin, Selypa, Totapo, and Toma! It seems like these four were involved off in the background of the Broly movie… or at least that’s how I imagine it. (laughs)

Originally designed for and debuting in the franchise’s first major television special in 1990, Goku’s father Bardock has been repurposed many times in recent years, most recently for the Dragon Ball Super: Broly theatrical film, itself adapting the underlying source material from Akira Toriyama’s 2014 “Dragon Ball Minus” bonus chapter from the Jaco the Galactic Patrolman collected edition. Whereas the original television special sees Bardock arriving to find his four teammates slaughtered by Dodoria & co., the updated story sees Bardock in a sequence of mostly one-one-one interactions with Leke and his wife Gine before hopelessly firing back against Freeza’s killing blast.

This sketch and comment set has been added to the respective page in our “Translations” archive.

Published by VegettoEX
21 January 2019, 1:49 PM EDTComment

Continuing onward from previous chapters, Viz has added their English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s forty-fourth chapter to their website, moving further into the original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner arc”. Alongside other initiatives including free chapters and a larger archive for paid subscribers, this release begins a new feature of not simply simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut to the release date, but to its local time in Japan in today’s March 2019 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine in Japan.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ forty-fourth chapter coming today in the magazine’s March 2019 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward telling its own version of the existing story, having recently entered its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” arc. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. The fifth collected volume is due in English from Viz this coming May, while Shueisha released the eighth collected volume in Japan last month.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub airing on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its seventh box set this coming April.

Published by VegettoEX
17 January 2019, 2:47 PM EDTComment

Viz announced today their forthcoming English-language publication of 2013’s Dragon Ball: Chōgashū as Dragon Ball: A Visual History, set for release this fall.

Alongside the release of the final Chōzenshū (updated and expanded versions of the original Daizenshuu guidebook series), Shueisha released the Chōgashū (or “Super Art Collection”) in May 2013. At its core, the Chōgashū is an update and expansion of the first Daizenshuu volume from 1995: it contains all the illustrations from Daizenshuu 1, plus a number of items that fell through the cracks and were later published in Daizenshuu 7, as well as the vast majority of Toriyama’s Dragon Ball-related work since 1995 (such as Toriyama’s Hoko×Tate illustration, Tōhoku earthquake/tsunami support image, and “Super Collaboration Ticket” drawing of Goku). It contains the original “Akira Toriyama Super Interview” from Daizenshuu 1 alongside a new Q&A session, as well as a single, JIS B4-sized poster featuring Toriyama’s personal favorite Dragon Ball illustration (Goku and Gohan on a two-legged motorbike, originally drawn as a bonus poster in a 1990 issue of Weekly Jump), and on the reverse, a listing of all Jump issues that featured Dragon Ball over the course of the series’ run. Within the book, pages are glossy and thick, with its 240 pages managing to nearly equal the thickness of the 352-page Chōzenshū books. Due to space considerations with the sheer number of illustrations, a number of images have been reprinted at a smaller size than in the first Daizenshuu, but all are sharp and faithfully reproduced.

The company noted in a subsequent tweet that the included image was of the original Japanese cover, and that their own cover design would debut soon.

The Chōgashū received a translated release in Hong Kong back in 2017.

Published by VegettoEX
17 January 2019, 11:29 AM EDTComments Off

FUNimation’s online shop reveals an 02 April 2019 release date for their seventh part of the Dragon Ball Super television series on DVD and Blu-ray.

In an effort to teach Future Zeno about martial arts, Zeno calls for an exhibition match between the 7th and 9th Universes. Afterwards, Goku searches for the 7th Universe’s 10 best fighters. With only 48 hours until the Tournament of Power officially begins, will he put together a strong enough team in time, or will the Z Fighters be at a major disadvantage from the get-go?!

The bilingual (English/Japanese) two-disc set will span episodes 79 to 91 and is slated to contain 16 minutes of bonus material. The set will retail for $39.98 MSRP on DVD and $44.98 MSRP on Blu-ray, and is also available to pre-order on Amazon in addition to FUNimation’s own online shop.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub airing on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its sixth box set this month.

Published by VegettoEX
16 January 2019, 6:48 AM EDTComments Off

In a coordinated tweet across Shueisha’s V-Jump account and various international Bandai Namco accounts, the company has announced a forthcoming “action RPG” under the codename “Dragon Ball Game Project Z” for planned release in 2019, with initial details coming in next week’s March 2019 issue of V-Jump.

Rumors of a non-fighting, action RPG entry for the franchise have been heavily circulating for some time.

Alongside the announcement, a more formal tease of additional downloadable content for Dragon Ball FighterZ was also made. During the company’s pre-recorded live stream earlier this week, when asked specifically about a “season two” of additional content, game producer Tomoko Hiroki asked players to stay tuned during the Red Bull Final Summoning tournament occurring January 26 to 27. In this morning’s aforementioned tweet, Bandai Namco specifically teases: “The warrior from Universe 11 is joining the fight!”

Dragon Ball FighterZ is a 3-on-3, “2.5D” fighting game developed by Arc System Works and is currently available on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC (via Steam), and Nintendo Switch. Playable characters include Son Goku, Son Gohan (Cell arc design), Vegeta, Freeza, Cell, Boo (Good), Trunks, Piccolo, Kuririn, #16, #18 (with #17), Yamcha, Tenshinhan (with Chiaotzu), Ginyu (with teammates), Nappa (with Saibaimen), Gotenks, Son Gohan (Boo arc design), Boo (Pure), Hit, Beerus, and Goku Black (with Zamasu), as well as “Super Saiyan God Super Saiyan” (SSGSS, or “Super Saiyan Blue”) versions of Goku and Vegeta that can be accessed early via pre-orders or unlocked through gameplay. The Akira Toriyama-designed “#21” is a new character central to the game’s story mode.

The game’s current $34.99 “FighterZ Pass” covers eight total additional playable characters (also available individually at $5 each); these include Broli, Bardock, Vegetto, Merged Zamasu, (non-Super Saiyan, “black hair”) Son Goku, and (non-Super Saiyan, “black hair”) Vegeta, Coola, and No. 17.

Dragon Ball FighterZ was originally released 26 January 2018 in North America and Europe, and 01 February 2018 in Japan, with the Switch release coming later in September. Alongside its Japanese release, Bandai Namco announced that they had shipped two million copies of the game, making it the fastest-shipping game in the franchise’s history.