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3,602 Posts & 2,310 Pages Documenting Dragon Ball, since 1998. We've got you covered!
Published by 20 June 2022, 3:37 PM EDTComment

SHOW DESCRIPTION:

Episode #0493! Mike brings on Julian and Ian to review the new theatrical film, “Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero”! Tune in for all the details on the Japanese theater experience, how the new visual style brings the franchise to life, and more! Tiptoe around things with us for the first half, and then stick around into the second half for all the spoiler-filled discussions you can eat!

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Published by 20 June 2022, 11:16 AM EDTComment

Continuing onward from previous chapters, Shueisha and Viz have added the official English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s eighty-fifth chapter to their respective Manga Plus and Shonen Jump services, continuing the brand-new “Granolla the Survivor arc”. Alongside other initiatives including free chapters and a larger archive for paid subscribers, this release continues the companies’ schedule of not simply simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut to the release date, but to its local time in Japan alongside its serialization in today’s August 2022 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ eighty-fifth chapter coming today in the magazine’s August 2022 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” and “Granolla the Survivor” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017; the company’s sixteenth collected volume is due out in August 2022.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. Crunchyroll (by way of the merger with FUNimation) owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set in 2020. A complete steelbook “Limited Edition” is due from Crunchyroll this coming September.

Published by 17 June 2022, 1:52 PM EDTComment

Shueisha and online retailers have listed the nineteenth collected volume of the Dragon Ball Super manga series by Toyotarō as releasing 04 August 2022 in Japan for ¥484 + tax.

Following most previous volumes, the upcoming 19th volume should be set to include four Dragon Ball Super manga chapters, spanning 81-84.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ eighty-fifth chapter coming next week in the magazine’s August 2022 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” and “Granolla the Survivor” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017; the company’s sixteenth collected volume is due out in August 2022.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. Crunchyroll (by way of the merger with FUNimation) owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set in 2020. A complete steelbook “Limited Edition” is due from Crunchyroll this coming September.

Published by 17 June 2022, 10:16 AM EDTComment

The latest addition to our ever-growing “Translations” archive is the third and final part from a panel held at “Unite Tokyo 2019”, a video game development conference that brings current and past developers together for a series of meetings and lectures. This particular panel featured three massive names in the field of Dragon Ball, licensing, and video game development: Kazuhiko Torishima, Daisuke Uchiyama, and Shin Unozawa.

This third and final part of the panel further explores the role of a series editor at Jump with regard to licensed merchandise (specifically video games), and how this merchandise has evolved to its own independent state of truly being “art” on par with the original works.

With our translation of this panel alongside a series of game development-related interviews in 2016’s Super History Book, we hope to bring even more of a critical eye and wealth of (factual!) citations to enrich fandom’s understanding of Dragon Ball video games and their ever-changing development cycles. Much like the larger franchise as a whole, Dragon Ball games have so many preconceptions, misunderstandings, and false assumptions around them, and we are excited to bring some of these sources to light.

If you have not already, please enjoy the first two parts of this panel along with this final part:

Published by 16 June 2022, 2:02 PM EDTComment

The September 2021 issue of Shueisha’s Saikyō Jump magazine kicked off a new “Dragon Ball Super Gallery” series in commemoration of the Dragon Ball franchise’s upcoming 40th anniversary. The new celebration aims to have different artists all contribute their own spin on the original 42 tankōbon covers, with the images and an accompanying comment published as part of the magazine.

Following the previous ten entries, this month’s July 2022 issue brings us Yūsei Matsui (Neuro: Supernatural Detective, Assassination Classroom) and their take on the series’ 20th volume cover:

Matsui commented:

Even I, who had no drawing aptitude, am managing to get some understanding of art after keeping at it for all these years. Even with the drawings of people that are so talented as to be almost magical, once you understand the way the art was composed, the “magic” turns into “technique,” and you can learn it and get even better. However, Toriyama-sensei‘s art is the only one whose technique I feel I can’t quite get a hold of. No matter how many years pass, it still keeps its “magical” status. It’s easy enough to imitate, but its essence will forever remain out of reach. That’s the feeling I get once again, as I have the privilege of imitating that image of the ideal manga artist.

Saikyō Jump is currently a monthly magazine published in Japan by Shueisha under the “Jump” line of magazines. The magazine began as a quarterly publication in 2012, went monthly in 2013, went bimonthly in late-2014, and returned to a monthly format last fall (including a digital release for the first time). The magazine’s focus is spin-off and supplementary manga series aimed at a young audience, while also including game promotions, news coverage, and more. The magazine currently serializes content such as Yoshitaka Nagayama’s Super Dragon Ball Heroes: Ultra God Mission!!!! manga series, Yūji Kasai’s Super Dragon Ball Heroes: Avatars!! manga series, and the Dragon Ball GT Anime Comic. For calendar year 2019, Shueisha reported Saikyō Jump‘s circulation down at 130,000, with readership as 58.5% upper elementary school, 28% lower middle school, 11% middle school, and 2.5% high school or older.

Published by 16 June 2022, 11:57 AM EDTComment

Crunchyroll — having effectively absorbed the FUNimation brand at this point — has announced a forthcoming complete, limited edition, steelbook version of the Dragon Ball Super television series on Blu-ray set for release 20 September 2022.

Dragon Ball Super: Complete Series Limited Edition Blu-ray contains episodes 1-131 of the anime directed by Ryota Nakamura, collected in 10 Blu-ray volumes and housed in limited edition Steelbook cases.

After defeating Majin Buu, life is peaceful once again. However, new threats begin to loom one after another. From Beerus, the God of Destruction, to the resurrection of Frieza, foes from across time and space step up to face Goku and his friends.

Special Features: An Interview with Sean Schemmel; Coffee Break with Mai and Trunks; Dragon Ball Super at Anime Expo 2018 Interviews with Sonny Strait, Matthew Mercer, and Kyles Hebert; Rawly Pickens & Chuck Huber Answer Twitter, Dragon Ball Super: Two Humans and an Android; Twitter Q&A with Sarah Widenheft and Dawn Bennett; Interview with Patrick Seitz and Kyle Hebert; Textless Opening and Closing Songs

The set will retail for $199.98 MSRP, and is currently available for pre-order at Amazon and RightStuf (the latter of which features a hefty discount down at $149.99).

Though other international editions have compiled the full series, this forthcoming release marks the first all-in-one set available in America following FUNimation’s prior, individual “Part” releases.

Published by 15 June 2022, 3:50 PM EDTComment

Crunchyroll has announced upcoming international screenings for the new theatrical film Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero, kicking off 18 August 2022 in Australia, New Zealand, and much of the Spanish-speaking Americas, followed by additional dates in various other territories, including the United States on 19 August 2022.

Kanzenshuu has independently followed up with Crunchyroll to confirm that screenings of the film in its original Japanese language with accompanying English subtitles will be available — in addition to English dubbed screenings — specifically within the United States of America. This is notable, as it was not the case with the three most recent films (Battle of Gods, Resurrection ‘F’, and Broly), even when subtitled screenings were in fact available outside of America.

CRUNCHYROLL ANNOUNCES GLOBAL THEATRICAL RELEASE DATES FOR “DRAGON BALL SUPER: SUPER HERO”

Crunchyroll’s First Worldwide Release Coming to Theaters in North America, U.K and Ireland on August 19, Others in August and September

Culver City, CA (June 14, 2022) – Today, Crunchyroll and Toei Animation unveiled additional details for the global theatrical release of Dragon Ball Super: SUPER HERO, the newest film in the worldwide anime blockbuster franchise, including a new trailer, and new English voice cast. The film will be available in both English dub and subtitled and will arrive in more than 2300 theaters in the United States and Canada on August 19 with tickets on sale starting July 22.  The film will also be released in select U.S. based IMAX® theaters. For more information on the film visit http://2022dbs-global.com/.

Crunchyroll also announced the English Voice Cast for the film:

Son Gohan – Kyle Hebert
Son Goku – Sean Schemmel
Son Goten – Robert McCollum
Piccolo – Christopher R. Sabat
Bulma – Monica Rial
Vegeta – Christopher R. Sabat
Krillin – Sonny Strait
Trunks – Eric Vale
Videl – Kara Edwards
Pan – Jeannie Tirado

New English Voice Cast:

Dr. Hedo – Zach Aguilar
Gamma 1 – Aleks Le
Gamma 2 – Zeno Robinson
Magenta – Charles Martinet
Carmine – Jason Marnocha

Dragon Ball Super: SUPER HERO, the second film in the Dragon Ball Super franchise, opens in theaters across the globe in all continents. The film arrives on the following dates in the following regions and territories:

  • August 18 in Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Brazil, Peru, Chile, Argentina, Colombia, Central America, Ecuador, Bolivia, Uruguay, Paraguay
  • August 19 in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa, Zambia, Vietnam
  • August 26 in India, Indonesia
  • August 30 in Malaysia, Brunei
  • August 31 in the Philippines
  • September 1 in Singapore
  • September 8 in Taiwan
  • September 15 in South Korea
  • September 29 in Thailand, Hong Kong, Macao
  • Additional global release dates for the film will be announced soon.

This is the first truly globally-distributed theatrical release for Crunchyroll and is distributed in North America by Crunchyroll. Internationally, the film will be distributed by Crunchyroll and Sony Pictures Entertainment.

The story, script, and character designs for Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero were crafted by original manga author Akira Toriyama. Shueisha’s executive producer Akio Iyoku noted that the movie’s story takes place after the events in Dragon Ball Super: Broly, but before the 28th Tenka’ichi Budōkai, and features the revival of the notorious Red Ribbon Army. The film’s director ia Tetsuro Kodama, who was most recently the CG Sequence Director for the Dragon Ball Super: Broly film, with Hoon Jung-jae taking over the CG Director role after being a CG effects artist in the preceding two films, Battle of Gods and Resurrection ‘F’. The film’s theatrical score is composed by Naoki Satō. The movie was released in Japan on 11 June 2022, following a delay decided upon in conjunction with a Toei network hack.

Published by 13 June 2022, 2:17 PM EDTComment

The latest addition to our ever-growing “Translations” archive is a brief interview with Chikashi Kubota, animation supervisor for the new theatrical film Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero, from the film’s own theatrical pamphlet in Japan.

What kinds of things posed difficulties during production?
When the description came in that this would be a 3D CG film, of course I had some trepidation. But beyond that, whether in 2D or 3D, was the sense that I just wanted to keep working with Dragon Ball. When I read the script, I was incredibly excited — it reminded me of my days buying Weekly Jump and reading the latest chapter of Dragon Ball as a kid. I was like, “Wow, this is new Dragon Ball!” (laughs) With a 3D project in particular, I felt like I might be able contribute my fixation with replicating Toriyama-sensei‘s style, on top of simply rendering the characters in three dimensions. Everyone has a sense of that distinct “Toriyama quality,” and I pored over the work of previous animators and their own approaches to representing Toriyama-sensei‘s artwork to convey that in the film.

Published by 10 June 2022, 10:41 AM EDTComment

The latest addition to our ever-growing “Translations” archive is the second part (of three total) from a panel held at “Unite Tokyo 2019”, a video game development conference that brings current and past developers together for a series of meetings and lectures. This particular panel featured three massive names in the field of Dragon Ball, licensing, and video game development: Kazuhiko Torishima, Daisuke Uchiyama, and Shin Unozawa.

This second part of the panel extensively explores the production troubles behind the first Dragon Ball Z video game developed for the PlayStation 2 (released internationally under the “Budokai” title), including a substantial issue where the Jump editorial board — Kazuhiko Torishima himself included — had no idea what was in development and, as a result, forced the developer to scrap all existing work on the project.

With our translation of this panel alongside a series of game development-related interviews in 2016’s Super History Book, we hope to bring even more of a critical eye and wealth of (factual!) citations to enrich fandom’s understanding of Dragon Ball video games and their ever-changing development cycles. Much like the larger franchise as a whole, Dragon Ball games have so many preconceptions, misunderstandings, and false assumptions around them, and we are excited to bring some of these sources to light.

This particular panel serves as an underlying basis for one of our most recent “Rumor Guide” additions: “The Budokai Video Games Held Back Story Content Due to the English Dub Being So Far Behind

For now, enjoy the translation of the second part of this “Unite Tokyo 2019” panel series (alongside the first part if you have not already read it!), and please look forward to more!

Published by 01 June 2022, 2:13 PM EDTComment

While we get another batch of our own Kanzenshuu podcast episodes into production, check out the following guest appearances where Mike joins up with a couple other shows for some additional Dragon Ball and Akira Toriyama discussion goodness!

We Gotta Podcast

REVIEW: The Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans (1994)

Back in April, Randy and Doug from We Gotta Podcast invited Mike along for the ride to review the 1994 “Official Visual Guide” or “Original Video Animation” — or whatever you want to call it, really! — The Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans, the video based on the video game itself all put together around multiple other projects… well, it’s a long story, so listen in for the full scoop!

(Need more Randy and Doug? Other than their podcast, these knuckleheads tend to hang out for our weekly Saturday night Mario Kart streams.)

(Need more Saiyan Eradication? We reviewed this same original version back on Episode #0235 of our own podcast, followed by the remake Plan to Eradicate the Super Saiyans shortly thereafter on Episode #0238!)

You ever heard of the lost OVA of the Dragon Ball Z series? Well, there’s a lot more to it than that, so Randy and Doug brought on Mike, VegettoEX, to teach us a thing or two about an NES game, VHS tapes, a 1990’s Bandai CDROM console, and a PS3/Xbox360 game to give us the whole story!

Manga Mavericks

REVIEW: Akira Toriyama’s Manga Theater (2021)

Colton and Lum from Manga Mavericks invited Mike alongside artist Darren Vogt to review Viz’s Akira Toriyama’s Manga Theater, a premium hardcover release from last year compiling the three Akira Toriyama’s _____piece Theater volumes from Japan, which themselves collected a wealth of Akira Toriyama’s one-shots and short manga series.

(Special thanks to Darren in particular for the amazing artwork for this podcast episode!)

On this episode of Manga Mavericks, Colton & Lum are joined by Mike (VegettoEX), one of the founders of the biggest Dragon Ball fansite on the internet, Kanzenshuu, as well as Darren Vogt, artist extraordinaire and one of the hosts of the Comics on the Spot podcast, to discuss Akira Toriyama’s Manga Theater! A collection of comics from Akira Toriyama spanning across multiple decades of his career from before the start of Dr Slump to near the end of Dragon Ball! Toriyama is one of our favorite manga artists of all time, so there was no way we wouldn’t cover more of his comics at some point, especially with a new collection of his stories that have never been released before officially in English until recently! We cover this collection of over 20 stories as exhaustively as possible, as Mike provides a lot of much needed context for the publication of a lot of them and pinpoint where Toriyama was in his career at the time of each of them, while Darren provides his perspective as a fellow artist and what makes Toriyama’s comics craft so interesting even as far back as his pre-Dr Slump days! Join us as we rediscover our love of Toriyama’s works and reevaluate why he’s simply one of the best at what he does!

If you already subscribe to Kanzenshuu‘s podcast through a service like iTunes or Google, or through a dedicated app like (our favorite!) Overcast, these guest appearance episodes are already in our feed and already delivered to your device!

Enjoy, and we’ll be back at you again soon.