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Published by VegettoEX
21 July 2021, 11:46 AM EDTComment

Each month, Toyotarō provides a drawing of a Dragon Ball character — as well as an accompanying comment — on the official Japanese Dragon Ball website. Following up on the wealth of characters already drawn, for his July 2021 entry, Toyotarō has contributed a drawing of Paikuhan (and others!) from the Afterlife Tournament filler arc of the Dragon Ball Z television series.

Paikuhan
and Other Afterlife Tournament Competitors

From the top it’s ↑ Tolbee, → Furog, ← Caterpie, and ↓ Tapicar!

This drawing and comment set has been added to the respective page in our “Translations” archive.

Published by VegettoEX
20 July 2021, 9:21 PM EDTComment

Continuing onward from previous chapters, Shueisha and Viz have added the official English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s seventy-fourth chapter to their respective Manga Plus and Shonen Jump services, continuing the brand-new “Granolla the Survivor arc”. Alongside other initiatives including free chapters and a larger archive for paid subscribers, this release continues the companies’ schedule of not simply simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut to the release date, but to its local time in Japan alongside its serialization in today’s September 2021 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ seventy-fourth chapter coming today in the magazine’s September 2021 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” and “Granolla the Survivor” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. The fourteenth collected volume is due this September.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set last year.

Published by VegettoEX
23 June 2021, 12:47 PM EDTComment,

Shueisha has listed the sixteenth collected volume of the Dragon Ball Super manga series by Toyotarō and the second collected volume of the Super Dragon Ball Heroes: Big Bang Mission!!! manga series by Yoshitaka Nagayama as releasing 04 August 2021 in Japan for ¥484 each.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ seventy-third chapter coming this week in the magazine’s August 2021 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” and “Granolla the Survivor” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. The fourteenth collected volume is due this September.

Yoshitaka Nagayama debuted in a supplemental booklet packed in with the December 2013 issue of Saikyō Jump, with Dragon Ball Heroes: Rookie Charisma Mission Episode 0 depicting the daily life and “training” of Engineer Yoshito and new Battle Navigators Tsubasa and Momo-chan in a cartoony style. The series eventually received its own standard serialization in Saikyō Jump beginning in the July 2014 issue, followed by the traditional story serials of Dark Demon Realm Mission! beginning in the September 2016 issue, Universe Mission!! beginning in the May 2018 issue, and now the latest and current series, Big Bang Mission!!!, beginning in the May 2020 issue. The prior two series have been collected in full, and the first collected volume of the Big Bang Mission!!! series saw a release back in December 2020. The various Dragon Ball Heroes manga series remain without an official English translation and release.

Published by VegettoEX
22 June 2021, 2:52 PM EDTComment

The latest addition to our “Press Archive” is another fun blast-from-the-past: a general overview of the “anime invasion” from the August 14, 1995 issue of Newsweek, which happens to also mention the impending broadcast of FUNimation’s English dub of the Dragon Ball television series.

Imported by cultists since the ’60s, Japanese animation, or “anime,” is infiltrating the mainstream. Michael Jackson’s “Scream” video lifts images from the anime (pronounced ANNI-may) classic “Akira.” Next month, two Japanese children’s shows, “Sailor Moon” and “Dragon Ball,” will hit Saturday-morning TV here and could ignite the next big merchandising frenzy this Christmas.

Enjoy this article over in our “Press Archive” along with over 100 other historical articles and columns from trade publications as well as video game and anime magazines of the era.

Published by VegettoEX
22 June 2021, 11:39 AM EDTComment

Each month, Toyotarō provides a drawing of a Dragon Ball character — as well as an accompanying comment — on the official Japanese Dragon Ball website. Following up on the wealth of characters already drawn, for his June 2021 entry, Toyotarō has contributed a drawing of Chop Chai from the Afterlife Tournament filler arc of the Dragon Ball Z television series.

Chop Chai

He’s a competitor in the Afterlife Tournament. His specialty seems to be splitting into multiple copies of himself. Perhaps doing a match on a team that’s made up entirely of yourselves is the best kind of teamwork?

Chop Chai is likely named after an Indonesian fried noodle dish called Chapuchai (チャプチャイ) in Japanese or cap cai in Indonesian. Many Afterlife Tournament characters are named for foods, with Migoren and Sarte both being similarly named after Indonesian dishes.

Toyotarō noted on Twitter that he will continue with the Afterlife Tournament characters for the foreseeable future in this monthly column.

This drawing and comment set has been added to the respective page in our “Translations” archive.

Published by VegettoEX
22 June 2021, 11:29 AM EDTComment

Continuing onward from previous chapters, Shueisha and Viz have added the official English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s seventy-third chapter to their respective Manga Plus and Shonen Jump services, continuing the brand-new “Granolla the Survivor arc”. Alongside other initiatives including free chapters and a larger archive for paid subscribers, this release continues the companies’ schedule of not simply simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut to the release date, but to its local time in Japan alongside its serialization in this week’s August 2021 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ seventy-third chapter coming this week in the magazine’s August 2021 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” and “Granolla the Survivor” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. The fourteenth collected volume is due this September.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set last year.

Published by VegettoEX
08 June 2021, 10:07 AM EDTComment

The latest addition to our “Press Archive” is another fun blast-from-the-past: an Internal Correspondence article from the April 1995 issue announcing the forthcoming syndication broadcast debut of the original Dragon Ball television series from FUNimation.

The article is also noteworthy for mentioning Viz’s ongoing negotiations for their Dragon Ball manga license, which was still almost three years off from this point.

Enjoy this article over in our “Press Archive” along with over 100 other historical articles and columns from trade publications as well as video game and anime magazines of the era.

Published by VegettoEX
28 May 2021, 9:48 AM EDT1 Comment

Following the initial announcement back in February, Tubi has launched the full 74 episode run of the Dr. Slump franchise’s 1997 reboot television series on its free streaming service:

English subtitles are provided through the service’s closed captions functionality.

Based on Akira Toriyama’s 1980-1984 manga originally serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump, the original Dr. Slump television series by Toei Animation ran from 1981 to 1986 on Fuji TV; it was replaced by the Dragon Ball television series after its conclusion. In a fitting switch, this 1997 Dr. Slump reboot television series took its original timeslot back following the conclusion of the Dragon Ball GT television series that November.

Arale and the Dr. Slump cast have made their way into the extended Dragon Ball universe many times over the years, beginning with a three-chapter crossover during the original manga’s Red Ribbon Army story arc. The 1997 series features its own original four-episode crossover from episodes 56 to 59.

Along with Dragon Ball, Harmony Gold dubbed a pilot production of Dr. Slump in the 1980s, though this attempt never resulted in a proper, continued broadcast of the series. The Dr. Slump television series has long had a complete episode listing on Amazon Prime, though the episodes have not been actually made available for streaming in America. The original manga, translated by Alexander O. Smith, is available in English from Viz both digitally and in print.

Published by VegettoEX
21 May 2021, 6:48 AM EDTComments Off

Each month, Toyotarō provides a drawing of a Dragon Ball character — as well as an accompanying comment — on the official Japanese Dragon Ball website. Following up on the wealth of characters already drawn, for his May 2021 entry, Toyotarō has contributed a drawing of Malaiko from the Afterlife Tournament filler arc of the Dragon Ball Z television series.

Malaiko

A competitor in the Afterlife Tournament, who appears to take pride in his monstrous strength. Kinda reminds you of Giran, doesn’t he.

Malaiko’s name (マーライコー Māraikō) is likely sourced from one pronunciation of Malay sponge cake, a southeast Asian food.

This drawing and comment set has been added to the respective page in our “Translations” archive.

Published by VegettoEX
20 May 2021, 11:21 AM EDTComments Off

Continuing onward from previous chapters, Shueisha and Viz have added the official English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s seventy-second chapter to their respective Manga Plus and Shonen Jump services, continuing the brand-new “Granolla the Survivor arc”. Alongside other initiatives including free chapters and a larger archive for paid subscribers, this release continues the companies’ schedule of not simply simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut to the release date, but to its local time in Japan alongside its serialization in today’s July 2021 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ seventy-second chapter coming today in the magazine’s July 2021 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” and “Granolla the Survivor” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. The thirteenth collected volume is due this June.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set last year.