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3,619 Posts & 2,315 Pages Documenting Dragon Ball, since 1998. We've got you covered!
Published by 01 April 2022, 11:00 AM EDT1 Comment

We have actively resisted soliciting formal, ongoing, incentivized crowdfunding support for so long — the entire 24 year legacy of this website, to be exact! But it’s time.

Who We Are

We are a relic of an ancient, bygone era: Kanzenshuu is a “just a fansite.” But what does that even mean, exactly? Well, it means we do everything ourselves. The people who code the site are the same ones writing the guides are the same ones translating interviews are the same ones writing news are the same ones recording the podcast, etc. etc. etc.

There is no corporate ownership. There is no managerial meddling. There is no content mandate or quotas to fill. We are an incredibly small, ragtag group of long-time friends working on a crazy side-project together.

This also means there is no backing. We pay our own bills. No-one has ever stepped in, nor would we ever allow anyone, to take control and steward this site in any way other than how we want to do it, in control of it the entire way, forever and ever.

We do what we do because we love it and we don’t want to (or know how to) do anything else. We believe raw information, well-sourced documentation, and a deep wealth of contextualized history is important, coming from people who care deeply about the franchise itself.

We come from an era before the concepts of “influencers” and “content creators” existed. We put the Kanzenshuu name above ourselves and all else, because we think it stands for something. We believe in what we’ve built. We know you believe in it, too. We see our name out there everywhere, to the point that so many folks don’t actually know what “the kaizeshuu” are, but they sure know they’re supposed to trust them! That’s a heck of a brand problem to have!

Acknowledging Past Initiatives

Many of you have made (occasionally even quite large!) one-time or recurring donations through services like PayPal over the years. These have been so incredibly appreciated, and have allowed us to upgrade audio equipment, reimburse large shipments from Japan, and so on and so forth.

We have run advertisements on our forum for a number of years now, too. We were completely surprised when the overwhelming feedback to us asking if that would be OK was: “are you crazy? Of course it’s OK!” Even then, we still felt weird about it, and have always turned off ads for all registered users, and do not run ads in the “Fan Works” sub-section. We have never adjusted (or even requested adjustments to) any content that runs in violation of the ad policies; we just let them automatically deactivate. It just wouldn’t feel right to us to do otherwise. As a result of these decisions, however, it means that these ads do little to cover our full costs.

(Related to that: you’ve probably noticed that the actual website itself doesn’t have ads or any kind of sponsorships. Neither does the podcast. Neither will the wiki. This is all by design and choice. We truly believe information should be free, clean, and readily-accessible.)

We have actively resisted direct crowdfunding. It never felt right to us, and to be quite candid, it still feels a little weird. We don’t like talking about money. We’ve already guaranteed you so many times that Kanzenshuu isn’t going anywhere, so why make it complicated?

Looking Ahead

I started “VegettoEX’s Ultimate DBZ Links Page” in January 1998. Without getting too deep in the math, let’s just say that’s a fair bit over half of my lifetime that I have been working on this site. I am in a different place in my life today than I was back then. We all are.

It takes a lot to keep Kanzenshuu online these days. Money is a non-insignificant part of that. We run a pretty tight ship around here, but when you consider the scope of the site and everything we do (website, forum, podcast, wiki…) plus all of the associated things that go along with maintaining those… woof, it’s a lot. And there’s still so much more we want to do! On top of that, who knows what kinds of cool things we’ll be able to do in another decade or two?!

So many of you have wanted to help over the years. You’ve broken through! OK — let’s do this!

But let’s also keep it simple.

Patreon

With Kanzenshuu continuing forward forever as a non-corporate fansite, and acknowledging that we have a lot on our plates, we want this to be easy — yet worthwhile! — for everyone. We are not going to over-promise, get distracted, and lose sight of the mission here. We want to keep doing what we’re doing, make it a little easier on ourselves, and give you all the opportunity to help.

That said, we are launching a Patreon support campaign with two monthly options:

  • $1 Tier: At this level you show your support for Kanzenshuu, and get a sweet “Patreon Supporter” forum rank.
  • $5 Tier: At this level you show your support for Kanzenshuu, get a sweet “Patreon Supporter” forum rank, and get access to our Discord server.

We gave these tiers a lot of thought, and have whittled and revised them down over years of consideration. Again, we want this to be simple. We subscribe to a number of Patreons ourselves, and these tiers feel right in line with a lot of the other fairly standard base offerings out there for other websites/podcasts/etc.

Discord in particular feels like a natural extension. We purposefully (and by design) keep “off-topic” material off of our forum; this is a way for some of us to shoot the breeze in a different, casual sort of way as a true community. The full Kanzenshuu family already uses Discord every day as a working project management and discussion area anyway, so why not extend that to the folks who care and believe in us the most? We can get a lot done by talking together!

We want to keep exclusion to a minimum, and not create additional work that would distract us from the real mission. It’s certainly always up for further consideration and discussion, but we think these two tiers work really well right now.

Where Will This Money Go?

We truly are keeping this as simple as possible: our number one priority is to cover our regular “keeping the lights on” costs. That’s it. We’re not paying ourselves, we’re not taking any residuals, and we’re not setting anything aside for anyone. This is about the site, not us.

If we happen to miraculously make it to a level where the operating costs are covered, the next costs to cover would be the regular purchase/shipping costs. This would be to cover things like the ongoing monthly magazines and the other items we purchase as reference material.

If by a second miracle we make it to a level beyond that… well, we’ll talk again if that happens.

Thank You!

We have a lot in store for you this year and beyond, and continue to be so appreciative of your support. Whether you have been with us since the AOL web space and chat room days, you discovered us through the podcast, or just wanted to look up what the heck those darn “kazenshuus” are, thank you very much!

Published by 01 April 2022, 10:55 AM EDTComment

We originally launched the “Rumor Guide” on 13 December 2003 back on Daizenshuu EX, one of the original fusees of this website. Alongside standard sections like the “Music Database” and the “Episode Guide“, it’s one of the longest-running sections we have that’s still based in some of the original, pre-Kanzenshuu content!

Since its launch, the “Rumor Guide” has consistently been one of the most-visited and oft-referenced sections of the site. It has remained a bit of a relic from that era, however, with giant pages and an inability to link directly to any particular, specific item.

As part of our big design refresh and various launches today, the “Rumor Guide” receives a major facelift! The main page now lists all of the entries with clear categories and status markers, each entry has been reviewed and updated as necessary, and each rumor is now its own unique, individual page that you can link directly to.

We didn’t stop there, though! Alongside the refresh, three significant new rumors have been added to the guide:

The Title of Dragon Ball Z Movie 1

What is the title of the first theatrical Dragon Ball Z film? If you live anywhere outside of Japan, you may know it by a name like “Dead Zone” or “Die Todezone Des Garlic Jr.” or “La Vendetta Divina” or “Jakten på Garlic”. But what about “Return My Gohan!”…?

The Budokai Video Games Held Back Story Content Due to the English Dub Being So Far Behind

With the first Dragon Ball Z: Budokai game — released in November 2002 in America — only covering through the Cell arc (with the bonus inclusion of an unlockable Great Saiyaman), one might be tempted to make a reasonable assumption that later story elements were held back because FUNimation’s English dub had not yet reached those points in the series.

FUNimation Did Not Begin Dubbing Dragon Ball Z Until 1999

Fans tend to confuse the order of events and multiple production partners over the years. What people regularly call “the Ocean dub” or “the Pioneer dub” or “the Saban dub” was always the FUNimation dub, right from the very start in 1994!

Enjoy the guide refresh, the new entries launching today, and look forward to even more new material hitting the guide soon!

(It’s funny to consider that, back at the section’s launch nearly twenty years ago, “There is a new series!” was a false rumor…!)

Published by 01 April 2022, 10:50 AM EDTComment

Man, things sure look different around here! Yet still familiar.

Believe it or not — as of today, April 1stKanzenshuu has been chugging along for 10 solid years. In internet time, that’s like… a century! And a lot can change in a century, especially on the internet. So what better way is there to celebrate our 10th anniversary than to give the site a much needed facelift?! The last design has served us well — even though remaining virtually unchanged for nearly five years — but with its core functionality lagging behind the times, it was time to move on and rebuild it from the ground up!

While the site’s content has remained essentially unchanged, the supporting infrastructure around it has been drastically altered, with all old stylings scrapped and everything completely recoded from scratch. We did this in large part to provide a more consistent viewing experience across devices, to standardized our stylings that through the years had become quite variable, and frankly to just freshen things up a bit. Obviously we didn’t stray too far from our previous overall layout design, but you’ll notice some changes to the font families in use, a little more color, and of course a new banner image! This is actually the first layout we’ve had that features original banner artwork designed exclusively for Kanzenshuu, which comes to us from our good friend @saber_breaker.

Another significant change you may notice is the site’s main navigation. It has always been a challenge to neatly organize all the links to our various sections, but I think we’ve finally gotten it right (after many late nights)! The main navigation now scrolls with you and is accessible from every page of the site, without having to jump back to the top of the page. In addition, the news archive has been tucked away under its own menu in the upper left, allowing easy access to it from anywhere on the site. And if you want to quickly jump straight to information on a specific series, that’s quickly accessible via the “Jump To Series” dropdown in the righthand sidebar, along with quick access to current event items (manga, movies, the podcast, etc.). Logging in with your user account is also easier now, with the user panel incorporated directly into the main navigation in the upper right.

Lastly, both the Press Archive and Lyric Database sections have been completely overhauled to match the previous facelift given to the Translations Archive in 2018. There are still plenty of other changes I unfortunately don’t have time to touch on in this post, so feel free to go exploring!

Be sure to stay tuned for some additional posts coming throughout the day featuring some new content and details on other changes coming to the site. And as always…

Happy April Fools’ Day!!

Published by 20 March 2022, 3:57 PM EDTComment

SHOW DESCRIPTION:

Episode #0491! Mike brings on Ian and Ajay to discuss the state of Dragon Ball manga and anime, respectively, in 2022. What do we know about the end of the current Dragon Ball Super manga arc? How does the production of a CG theatrical film fit in with the world of Dragon Ball animation? Join us for a crash-course in current Dragon Ball production, news, and updates!

REFERENCED SITES:

Our podcast is available via Apple Podcasts and/or Google Podcasts, or you can pop the direct RSS feed into the program of your choice. You can also listen to this episode by directly downloading the MP3 or by streaming it on Spotify, SoundCloud, or YouTube. We invite you to discuss this episode on our forum.

Published by 19 March 2022, 10:58 AM EDTComment

Each month, Toyotarō provides a drawing of a Dragon Ball character — as well as an accompanying comment — on the official Japanese Dragon Ball website. Following up on the wealth of characters already drawn, for his March 2022 entry, Toyotarō has contributed a drawing of Artificial Human No. 14:

Artificial Human No. 14

I’m also looking forward to the new artificial humans, Gamma 1 & 2, in the new movie, Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero!

* Incidentally, I’ve also drawn a brand-new illustration of Gamma 1 & 2 in the back of Dragon Ball Super vol. 18, which goes on sale Monday, April 4, so please check out the collected release, too!

No. 14 originates in the Dragon Ball Z series’ seventh theatrical film (“Extreme Battle!! The Three Great Super Saiyans”), originally debuting at the Toei Anime Fair in July 1992. While not contributing to the movie’s story development, original author Akira Toriyama provided original character designs for the three artificial humans (No. 13, 14, and 15), which were later printed in the “Gallery of Akira Toriyama” section of Daizenshuu 6. The section notes that at the time of Akira Toriyama’s designs the names of Nos. 14 and 15 were reversed; however, the two names were later swapped.

The “new movie” that Toyotarō refers to is the forthcoming Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero theatrical film. Though the film was originally slated to premiere 22 April 2022 in Japan, the film was just recently indefinitely delayed due to a Toei network hack/intrusion.

This drawing and comment set has been added to the respective page in our “Translations” archive.

Published by 18 March 2022, 12:52 PM EDT1 Comment

In a new official statement from the company, Toei has announced that — due to a network hack that occurred earlier this month — the release of the forthcoming Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero theatrical film has been delayed indefinitely from its original release date of 22 April 2022. No new release date has been determined at this time.

4月22日(金)より全国公開を予定しておりました映画『ドラゴンボール超 スーパーヒーロー』について、既報のとおり製作会社である東映アニメーションにおいて第三者によるネットワークへの不正アクセスが発生し、作品製作が困難な事態となりました。そのため、公開を延期せざるを得ない状況となったことをお知らせいたします。公開を楽しみにして頂いている皆様には、大変申し訳ございません。新しい公開日については、近日中に発表させて頂きますので、今しばらくお待ち下さい。何卒ご理解頂けますようお願い申し上げます。

尚、既にお買い求め頂きました前売券につきましては、新しい公開日以降ご利用頂けますので大切にお持ち下さい。


Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero was previously set to be released nationwide on Friday, April 22nd. However, as has been previously reported, the movie’s production company Toei Animation experienced a network breach by a third party, which caused issues in the movie’s production. Therefore, we are announcing that the movie’s release must be postponed. We deeply apologize to all who were looking forward to its release. A new release date will be announced in the near future, so we ask for your patience. We appreciate your understanding.

To those who have purchased advance tickets, they will still be valid starting from the new release date, so please be sure to hold on to them.

Various other items associated with the film, such as forthcoming novelizations, will almost certainly likewise see delays, though these delays have yet to be announced/confirmed.

Also attributed to the network hack, various television programs produced by Toei Animation currently on the air are seeing re-runs of previous episodes for the foreseeable future.

Published by 18 March 2022, 11:20 AM EDTComment

Continuing onward from previous chapters, Shueisha and Viz have added the official English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s eighty-second chapter to their respective Manga Plus and Shonen Jump services, continuing the brand-new “Granolla the Survivor arc”. Alongside other initiatives including free chapters and a larger archive for paid subscribers, this release continues the companies’ schedule of not simply simultaneously publishing the series’ chapter alongside its Japanese debut to the release date, but to its local time in Japan alongside its serialization in today’s May 2022 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ eighty-second chapter coming today in the magazine’s May 2022 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” and “Granolla the Survivor” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017; the sixteenth collected volume is due out in August 2022.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set in 2020.

Published by 18 March 2022, 11:15 AM EDTComment

The September 2021 issue of Shueisha’s Saikyō Jump magazine kicked off a new “Dragon Ball Super Gallery” series in commemoration of the Dragon Ball franchise’s upcoming 40th anniversary. The new celebration aims to have different artists all contribute their own spin on the original 42 tankōbon covers, with the images and an accompanying comment published as part of the magazine.

Following the previous seven entries, this month’s April 2022 issue brings us Tatsuya Endō (Spy x Family) and their take on the series’ 15th volume cover:

Endō commented:

Dragon Ball is my origin of origins. I first started drawing manga because I admired Toriyama so much. I’d copy his character art, copy whole chapters, and drew a ton of manga that were basically rip-offs of his. I also played Super Butōden like an idiot. I love the colorization and mechanical structures Toriyama employs on his title pages and frontispieces, and often have them in mind even now as I work. His fully-proportioned and super-deformed styles are both so cute I can’t stand it. I’m truly, truly honored to be able to take part in a project like this. Dragon Ball, congratulations on 40 years!

Saikyō Jump is currently a monthly magazine published in Japan by Shueisha under the “Jump” line of magazines. The magazine began as a quarterly publication in 2012, went monthly in 2013, went bimonthly in late-2014, and returned to a monthly format last fall (including a digital release for the first time). The magazine’s focus is spin-off and supplementary manga series aimed at a young audience, while also including game promotions, news coverage, and more. The magazine currently serializes content such as Yoshitaka Nagayama’s various ongoing Super Dragon Ball Heroes manga series and the Dragon Ball GT Anime Comic. For calendar year 2019, Shueisha reported Saikyō Jump‘s circulation down at 130,000, with readership as 58.5% upper elementary school, 28% lower middle school, 11% middle school, and 2.5% high school or older.

Published by 08 March 2022, 1:57 PM ESTComment

After having originally been announced for a Chicago debut in March 2020 and subsequently being cancelled due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the “Dragon Ball Symphonic Adventure” will now make its American debut on 21 May 2022 at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles, California.

Tickets go on sale 11 March 2022 at AXS.com.

The event has previously run several times in various European locations since 2017 with a 60+ member orchestra performing tracks from Shunsuke Kikuchi’s original Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z musical score, along with vocal performances from Hiroki Takahashi.

Published by 08 March 2022, 5:00 AM ESTComment

Viz’s seventeenth collected volume of the Dragon Ball Super manga will be released 06 December 2022, covering chapters 73-76 (a la its Japanese counterpart):

The battle between Granolah, Goku, and Vegeta continues on planet Cereal. With Granolah being the greatest warrior in the entire universe thanks to the power of the Dragon Balls, the two Saiyans struggle to hold their ground against their vengeful foe. Despite this battle being fueled by the lies and manipulation of the Heeters, Granolah’s burning drive for revenge has him convinced that this is a fight worth dying for! And that’s exactly what the Heeters were hoping for. Sensing something is amiss, Vegeta slowly puts the pieces together on why Granolah hates the Saiyans so much. But will he be able to figure out the truth in time? And will Granolah even be willing to listen?!

The volume is available for pre-order at Amazon at its $9.99 MSRP.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015, initially just ahead of the television series, and running both ahead and behind the series at various points. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ eighty-first chapter recently hitting in the magazine’s April 2022 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc, “speeding up the excitement of the TV anime even more”. Though the television series has completed its run, the manga continues onward, moving into its own original “Galactic Patrol Prisoner” and “Granolla the Survivor” arcs. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and began their own collected print edition back in 2017. The sixteenth volume is due out in August 2022 ahead of this newly-announced seventeenth volume in December.

The Dragon Ball Super television series concluded in March 2018 with 131 total episodes. FUNimation owns the American distribution license for the series, with the English dub having wrapped its broadcast on Cartoon Network, and the home video release reaching its tenth and final box set back in January 2020.