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Published by VegettoEX
24 March 2017, 9:43 PM EDTComment

Toei Animation’s official English-language website reports that Dragon Ball will be included as an example in a new exhibit on display at London’s Barbican Art Gallery:

Starting from March 23, Dragon Ball will be featured at the prestigious Barbican Art Gallery in London. It is part of The Japanese House Architecture and Life after 1945, an exhibition held until June 25, and co-organized by the Japan Foundation and the Barbican.

An extract of the original 1986 animated series will showcase the inventive world of Dragon Ball and the famous Capsule houses created by Akira Toriyama, and draw parallels with the actual work of visionary Japanese architects from the 1970’s.

The gallery’s official website describes “The Japanese House Architecture and Life after 1945”:

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945 is the first major UK exhibition to focus on Japanese domestic architecture from the end of the Second World War to now, a field which has consistently produced some of the most influential and extraordinary examples of modern and contemporary design. Featuring over 40 architects, ranging from renowned 20th century masters and internationally celebrated contemporary architects to exciting figures little known outside of Japan, the exhibition celebrates some of the most ground-breaking architectural projects of the last 70 years.

At the heart of the exhibition is an ambitious and unprecedented full-size recreation of the Moriyama House (2005) by Pritzker-prize winning architect Ryue Nishizawa (SANAA). Visitors can weave in and out of the fully furnished units and garden, experiencing the remarkable house of Mr Moriyama in an immediate and physical way. Filling the other half of the Barbican’s lower galleries will be an eccentric and lovingly crafted Japanese tea house, commissioned for the exhibition from acclaimed architect, and highly respected historian of Japanese architecture, Terunobu Fujimori.

Considering developments in residential architecture in the light of important shifts in the Japanese economy, urban landscape, and family structure, the exhibition features over 200 works including rarely seen architectural models and drawings, photography and films, in order to cast a new light on the role of the house in Japanese culture.

At certain times during the exhibition run, tea ceremonies are performed for exhibition ticket holders in the Art Gallery within the garden of the tea house designed by Fujimori. The ceremony is demonstrated by the Urasenke Foundation Tea Ceremony Masters, a 400 year old Japanese Tea Ceremony School.

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945 is curated by Florence Ostende (Barbican Centre, London), in collaboration with Pippo Ciorra (MAXXI, National Museum of the 21st Century Arts, Rome). The Chief Advisor is Yoshiharu Tsukamoto (Atelier Bow-Wow/Tokyo Institute of Technology). The Academic Advisor is Hiroyasu Fujioka (Professor Emeritus, Tokyo Institute of Technology). The exhibition designer is Lucy Styles. The Fujimori tea-house is designed by Terunobu Fujimori in collaboration with architect Takeshi Hayatsu and built by students from Kingston University.

The exhibition is co-organised by the Japan Foundation and the Barbican Centre and co-produced by the Japan Foundation, the Barbican Centre, MAXXI National Museum of the 21st Century Arts, Rome and the Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo. The project was initially conceived in Tokyo by Kenjiro Hosaka (MOMAT) and Yoshiharu Tsukamoto.

The exhibit is running now and will continue through 25 June 2017. Tickets are available at various prices for certain age groups and membership levels. A 230-page, hardcover catalog complementing the exhibit is available on the gallery’s website for £35.00; international shipping appears to be available for £25.00.

Thanks to Baggie_Saiyan for the heads-up!

Published by VegettoEX
24 March 2017, 1:33 PM EDTComment

Continuing onward from the previous twenty chapters, Viz has added their English translation of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s twenty-first chapter to their website, continuing the “Future Trunks arc” of the manga.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015 as a promotional tie-in for the television series. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ twenty-second chapter coming earlier this week in the magazine’s May 2017 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc to act as further promotion for the television series. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and will release their own collected print edition beginning in May 2017.

The Dragon Ball Super television series now receives weekly simulcast streams on services such as Crunchyroll and Daisuki. FUNimation has also announced their American distribution license for the series, with the English dub beginning earlier this year on Cartoon Network.

Published by VegettoEX
22 March 2017, 6:17 PM EDTComment

Israeli newspaper Haaretz recently featured an editorial entitled, “This sadistic series is loved by kids, probably because that’s how they view the world.”

“Dragon Ball Super” has no low volume. The characters don’t stop threatening each other with death, annihilation, destruction and skewering. They are cruel and sadistic. The stress is on the levels of a heart attack. The children have already figured out where they live.

In the editorial, author Rogel Alpher notes that, while magic and heroism have been included in children’s content before, “[t]hey just have never been vulgar and so noisy.” Alpher notes how it is, “as if [the characters] suffer from some muscle disease, or they drank five cups of double espresso within five minutes.” He continues, “[t]he characters don’t stop threatening each other with death, annihilation, destruction and skewering. They’re cruel, even sadistic at times.” Continuing on about the series’ origin, Alpher states, “[b]ecause it was created in Japan, in anime tradition, all characters have enlarged eyes but with empty expressions.” Alpher concludes that children see a reflection of the real world — “[a]n exhausting and demanding world” — in Dragon Ball Super.

Alpher apparently has a knack for this kind of hyperbolic and flowery analysis; he once wrote regarding a particular television actress that she had a “dumb expression on her face”, “like she’s a zombie”, “[has] a condescending butt-face of models” and that “she has no ounce of talent”.

Dragon Ball Super began last year in Israel, airing daily and repeating in batches of 26 episodes on Nickelodeon. The series continued this month with the “Future Trunks arc” of the series.

Big thanks to @guybigel for the heads-up along with the extensive translation and background work!

We look forward to eventually including this as a part of our “Press Archive” — following our rough, completely arbitrary content guidelines — and encourage international readers/visitors/fans to submit links and translations of their own!

Published by VegettoEX
22 March 2017, 5:16 PM EDTComment

Back in December, Shueisha launched a new spin-off manga on the Shōnen Jump+ digital platform from popular fan artist dragongarowLEE. Dragon Ball Side-Story: The Case of Being Reincarnated as Yamcha told the story of a boy who falls down the stairs and dies, and though he is reincarnated into the Dragon World as Yamcha, he uses his knowledge of the series to overcome the character’s various obstacles (namely death).

At the time, dragongarowLEE thought the second chapter might be ready within the next month, but a few months have come and gone in the meantime. Taking to Twitter today, the artist provided a behind-the-scenes look at the series’ current progress and his own obstacles in getting the second chapter out to an eager audience.

The next part of “Reincarnated as Yamcha” has been a long time coming, but I’m still working on the manuscript right now, so please wait just a little bit longer. Sorry to all of you who are looking forward to it. 🙇🏻

The next chapter is 33 pages in total, but for the rough draft I drew about twice as much, including stuff that got rejected. ^_^; Maybe I’ll trying making some of the scenes I personally wanted to draw into bonus images. 😁

dragongarowLEE wrapped up with one more message: an image of Yamcha holding up two fingers and saying “The story of ‘Reincarnated as Yamcha’ still has two chapters left!”

The series is available for free in Japanese on Shueisha’s Shōnen Jump+ digital platform. Back in January, Buzzfeed Japan writer Tsunehiko Nishimaki interviewed an unnamed editor at Shueisha regarding the series and new initiatives.

Published by VegettoEX
21 March 2017, 8:19 PM EDTComment

In conjunction with today’s May 2017 issue of Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine in Japan, Bandai Namco has detailed preliminary information about the third paid downloadable content pack for Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2, which is set to drop in April 2017 and will contain new characters (namely Super Saiyan Rosé Goku Black, Zamasu, and Bojack) along with the usual new techniques, costumes, and more.

Dive into the Future Trunks saga with the DB SUPER PACK 3 to be released next April!
March 21, 2017

Get ready Time Patrollers as BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment Europe unveiled today more information on the forthcoming DB Super Pack 3! Additional characters, new parallel quests, additional skills, costumes and more are in the pipeline!

Putting the spotlight on the content of the Dragon Ball Super anime, this new DLC Pack will feature:

  • 3 Additional Characters: Goku Black Rose, Zamasu and Bojack.
  • 3 New Parallel Quests
  • 5 Additional Skills
  • 4 Additional Costumes
  • 5 Super Souls
  • 2 Emotes
  • Bojack as a Master, leading to new quests to unlock new Skills, Chats, Marks, and Nicknames.

To celebrate this new announcement, the Bojack Costume is now available in the TP Medal Shop! Be aware that to get Bojack as a Master when the DB Super Pack 3 will be released, you need to own this Bojack Costume.

The first paid downloadable content pack was released 20 December 2016, with the second pack following 28 February 2017. Downloadable content packs are included in the cost of the game’s season pass, which is available for $29.99 and will cover four total content packs.

Dragon Ball XENOVERSE 2 is currently available worldwide for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. In North America, the game launched for consoles 25 October 2016 with a PC release following 28 October 2016. In Europe, the game launched across all platforms 28 October 2016. In Japan, the game exclusively launched on the PlayStation 4 console 02 November 2016. The game was also recently announced for the Nintendo Switch.

Published by VegettoEX
21 March 2017, 7:23 PM EDT1 Comment

USAopoly, Inc., in conjunction with Toei Animation and Hasbro at New York’s Toy Fair earlier this month, has announced a Dragon Ball Z-branded edition of the popular MONOPOLY board game ($39.95 MSRP) coming to the United States and Canada in April 2017.

Raise Your Power Level and Charge them rent! In this episode of Dragon Ball Z, we find the Z-fighters in an epic battle of dice rolling and real estate! Recruit legendary warriors like GOKU, VEGETA and GOHAN to help in this adventure of MONOPOLY®: Dragon Ball Z! Take a chance to be the richest fighter in the world as you encounter the RED RIBBON ARMY and the CAPSULE CORP. Friends like BULMA and MASTER ROSHI can help you along the way on your path to greatness!

Licensed by TOEI, MONOPOLY®: Dragon Ball Z comes with all kinds of unique components such as 6 custom tokens featuring items from across the Dragon Ball Z universe, custom houses as the Kame House and hotels as the Hyperbolic Time Chamber, custom Community Chest cards are the CAPSULE CORP and custom Chance cards as the RED RIBBON ARMY.

Can you collect all the warriors and be the greatest? Find out, when you play MONOPOLY®: Dragon Ball Z!

MONOPOLY®: Dragonball Z will be available April 2017 at game and toy stores, as well as specialty retailers in the U.S. and Canada.

HASBRO and its logo and the MONOPOLY name and logo, the distinctive design of the game board, the four corner squares, the Mr. Monopoly name and character as well as each of the distinctive elements of the board and playing pieces are trademarks of Hasbro for its property trading game and game equipment. ©1935, 2017 Hasbro. All rights reserved. ®/™ denotes U.S. trademarks.

Player pieces are set to include: “Trunk’s [sic] Sword, DynoCap, 4-star Dragon ball, Dragon Radar, Saiyan Armor, Turtle Shell”.

The company previously announced a branded YAHTZEE edition ($19.95 MSRP), as well.

Gather round all Saiyans, Namekians, and humans for a true test of skill and might with the new YAHTZEE® Dragon Ball Z. Harness your chi and shake up classic combinations, like Full Houses, Small Straights, Large Straights, and the coveted Five of a Kind Yahtzee.

Licensed by TOEI Animation, YAHTZEE® Dragon Ball Z comes with a special edition cup modeled after the four star Dragon Ball. Roll your way to victory using custom dice that feature your favorite of Earth’s Special Forces, including Goku, Vegeta, Gohan, Piccolo, and Trunks, along with the android Cell in his fully evolved Perfect Form.

According to the company’s Toy Fair announcement this month, the YAHTZEE edition should also be available this April.

USAopoly, “a leading developer and manufacturer of board games and puzzles,” works with various publishers and rights-holders to produce various branded merchandise for series such as Harry Potter, Yu-Gi-Oh, The Walking Dead, Star Trek, and more.

A “Dragon Ball Z Shin Budokai 2” MONOPOLY Junior edition was marketed and released internationally back in 2009. This was seemingly non-Japanese, non-American product; America received the related PlayStation Portable game as Shin Budokai: Another Road.

American board game production for Dragon Ball dates back to FUNimation’s initial runthrough of the series. In 2002-2003, Panini released several Dragon Ball Z “Battle Board Game” editions, while FUNimation released a physical trivia game with Parklife Games in 2004.

Published by VegettoEX
17 March 2017, 1:42 PM EDTComment

This past weekend, we shared several old magazine articles with a live stream audience (podcast subscribers, check your feed and downloads for this bonus episode!). One of the clear favorites was a feature article from the summer 1991 issue of Animenominous! So far, this is the earliest American content we have brought to our “Press Archive“, pre-dating other magazines by at least two years.

What is so fascinating about this article, which otherwise simply provides an overview of the series up to the beginning of the Saiyan arc, is the combination of surprisingly-accurate information interspersed with complete fabrications. Learn all about how, “…Goku was the last son of a very wealthy and powerful family” and how the Demon King Piccolo, “…in the afterlife, repented his evils and became a force of good on Earth”!

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

While we have tons of additional content coming to the “Press Archive“, we wanted to share this above all else, particularly in light of the response during our live stream. Stay tuned for more live stream announcements, acquisitions and additions to the section, and more! Be sure to connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Google+, and Tumblr.

Published by VegettoEX
16 March 2017, 6:48 PM EDTComment

A new Amazon listing for Viz’s second volume of the Dragon Ball Super manga’s print edition is dated for 05 December 2017 at a $9.99 MSRP. A digital edition will also be available at various retailers, including Amazon, Comixology, and direct from Viz.

Goku’s adventure from the best-selling classic manga Dragon Ball continues in this new series written by Akira Toriyama himself!

Ever since Goku became Earth’s greatest hero and gathered the seven Dragon Balls to defeat the evil Boo, his life on Earth has grown a little dull. But new threats loom overhead, and Goku and his friends will have to defend the planet once again in this continuation of Akira Toriyama’s best-selling series, Dragon Ball!

The Universe 6 and 7 Invitational Fighting Tournament continues. Goku faces off against a guy who looks exactly like Freeza. Heck, the guy even has the same transformations and powers as Freeza! Will Goku and the warriors from Universe 7 be able to pull through and win the tournament and its prize—the Super Dragon Balls?!

The second collected edition is expected to cover chapters 10-15 a la its Japanese counterpart.

The Dragon Ball Super “comicalization” began in June 2015 as a promotional tie-in for the television series. The manga runs monthly in Shueisha’s V-Jump magazine, with the series’ twenty-second chapter coming next week in the magazine’s May 2017 issue. Illustrated by “Toyotarō” (in all likelihood, a second pen-name used by Dragon Ball AF fan manga author and illustrator “Toyble”), the Dragon Ball Super manga covered the Battle of Gods re-telling, skipped the Resurrection ‘F’ re-telling, and “charged ahead” to the Champa arc to act as further promotion for the television series. Viz is currently releasing free digital chapters of the series, and will release their own collected print edition beginning in May 2017.

The Dragon Ball Super television series now receives weekly simulcast streams on services such as Crunchyroll and Daisuki. FUNimation has also announced their American distribution license for the series, with the English dub beginning earlier this year on Cartoon Network.

Thanks to @Adil_OPP for the heads-up!

Published by VegettoEX
16 March 2017, 11:02 AM EDTComment

On the cusp of yet another monthly Dragon Ball Super manga chapter release, we start to see the following question pop up repeatedly within our own community and abroad: “When does V-Jump come out?”

The answer is set in stone and has not changed for years, but as new fans come in and as Dragon Ball Super‘s production continues its odd storytelling split between the television series and the printed page — not to mention the continued struggle with piracy and leaks — we understand how people might be confused. Here is a brief overview of the most relevant publications, their release dates, and their content:

  • V-Jump: Shueisha’s multimedia-focused magazine. Generally released on the 21st of each month. Dragon Ball coverage includes multi-page color spreads on current video games (console, mobile, and arcade), spin-off manga series (e.g., Dragon Ball Heroes: Victory Mission, Dragon Ball Super, etc.), the occasional interview, etc.
  • Saikyō Jump: Shueisha’s younger-child-focused spin-off magazine. Released for the first weekend of every other month. Dragon Ball coverage includes short news recaps and longer-term promotions, along with various spin-off manga series (e.g., Dragon Ball SD, Dragon Ball Fusions the MANGA!!, Super Dragon Ball Heroes: Dark Demon Realm Mission, etc.).
  • Weekly Shōnen Jump: Shueisha’s main, weekly manga anthology aimed at young boys (and is the publication where Dragon Ball was originally serialized). Released each Monday. Contemporary — but sporadic — Dragon Ball content includes weekly Dragon Ball Super episode promotions, short video game news recaps, and the occasional interview.
  • Miscellaneous Anime Magazines: Animage, Animedia, and Newtype are the most popular, and are generally released on the 10th of each month. Contemporary Dragon Ball content includes upcoming Dragon Ball Super episode staff and summaries, along with the occasional brief feature or interview.

For those interested in learning more, read on!

V-Jump

V-Jump (ブイジャンプ or Vジャンプ, née “Virtual Jump”) is Shueisha’s multimedia-focused magazine. Its primary coverage is that of video games from its partners and advertisers (everything from console to mobile to arcade games); for Dragon Ball, this is generally multi-page color spreads near the beginning of the issue. V-Jump‘s coverage does also extend to the occasional interview and feature on a series independent of game content. Most notably right now, this includes the serialization of Toyotarō’s Dragon Ball Super “comicalization”. Previous Dragon Ball manga within V-Jump has included Toyotarō’s own three-part Resurrection ‘F’ introductory manga in 2015, and before that, his Dragon Ball Heroes: Victory Mission series from 2012-2015. Naho Ooishi’s Episode of Bardock manga ran in the August, September, and October 2011 issues of the magazine. Victory Mission was not even the first card-based spin-off manga for Dragon Ball within V-Jump‘s pages! Hobby Warrior: Burn On, Bui! (story by Mitsuru Misaki and art by Ryūji Tsugihara) was published in the magazine’s original trial run between 1990 and 1991, following the title character (“Bui” for “V”) as he partakes in Carddass battles.

Previous non-manga, promotional content included items such as the January 2017 issue’s “Dragon Ball Super Rivals Super Biographies” and the March 2013 issue’s “Akira Toriyama Special Interview“.

V-Jump is released on the 21st of each month, barring a Sunday or a holiday, in which case it gets moved up a day (or two, in the case that Monday is a holiday). There are very rare deviations to this schedule; for example, the February 2017 issue of V-Jump was released 17 December 2016 to coincide with that weekend’s Jump Festa in Tokyo (where more details on Dragon Ball Super‘s “Universe Survival arc” were set to debut). Issues are dated ahead by two months; for example, the May 2017 issue hits store shelves 21 March 2017.

As an aside, Viz is currently releasing free, English-translated Dragon Ball Super manga chapters digitally on their website. Chapters are released Fridays on a biweekly basis. As of this article’s publication, Viz is currently one chapter behind, and is expected to catch up next month. We do not yet know how their schedule will continue (if at all) once they reach this point.

These days V-Jump runs in the ¥500-600 range (roughly $5-6). With shipping from Amazon Japan to most regions within the continental United States, a single issue will run you $15-16. This is roughly the same markup you would pay at a local, stateside Kinokuniya or other Japanese book store. Like most magazines, V-Jump is a first-come, first-served, available-until-gone sort of production. There have been rare cases of reprints to keep circulation afloat, but in general, those looking to purchase an upcoming issue are best served by pre-ordering (Amazon Japan / CDJapan).

Other than short digital availability time frames for Dragon Ball Heroes: Victory Mission and the Resurrection ‘F’ manga, as well as a special Episode of Bardock pack-in with Saikyō Jump, the Dragon Ball Super manga is the only Dragon Ball-related V-Jump series currently receiving collected editions (print/digital).

Worth noting: Akira Toriyama’s original editor, Kazuhiko Torishima, served as V-Jump‘s Editor in Chief for several years following its debut.

Saikyō Jump

Saikyō Jump (最強ジャンプ) is Shueisha’s younger-child-focused spin-off magazine. Its main content focus is “chibi” or “SD” (childish, “super deformed”, exaggerated) stories featuring popular series such as Dragon Ball, Naruto, and One Piece. Due to the longer timespan between issues compared to V-Jump, Saikyō Jump‘s promotional coverage tends to be short recaps of information already made available elsewhere, or brief summaries for a month’s worth of upcoming content. The magazine began as a quarterly publication with four total issues in 2011. The magazine switched to a monthly format in 2012, and switched again to a bimonthly (every other month) release schedule in late-2014.

In the beginning, Dragon Ball content was limited to just Dragon Ball SD, but as-of-late this has expanded to no less than five related series:

  • Dragon Ball SD: A re-telling of the original series in “super deformed” style. Began in the four quarterly issues by skipping around to various points in the series, but switched to a total re-telling beginning with the magazine’s monthly format switch. This has otherwise remained the same since then, barring its original training arc and time-skip to the Saiyan arc. By Naho Ooishi; has appeared in every issue except the January 2017 issue.
  • Dragon Ball GT Anime Comic: Takes screen shots from the Dragon Ball GT television series and arranges them into manga format (“animanga”). Began with the Evil Dragons arc to tie-in with the (then-contemporary) Dragon Ball GT content in the Dragon Ball Heroes arcade game. Began in the January 2014 issue.
  • Dragon Ball Fusions the MANGA!!: Tells the story of Tekka and Pinich from the Nintendo 3DS game Dragon Ball Fusions as the kids fall into a mixed-up time/space Dragon World. By Hiroshi Otoki; began in the May 2016 issue.
  • Super Dragon Ball Heroes: Dark Demon Realm Mission: Initially replacing the previous Dragon Ball Heroes Super Charisma Mission! series, tells a story using the new Super Dragon Ball Heroes characters and mission sets as a basis. By Yoshitaka Nagayama; began in the September 2016 issue.
  • Super Dragon Ball Heroes: Ultimate Charisma Mission!!: A revival of the previous Charisma Mission series (which debuted with a special Rookie Charisma Mission Episode 0 in the December 2013 issue, then ran in earnest from the July 2014 to July 2016 issues). Engineer Yoshito, Battle Navigator Tsubasa, and Battle Princess Momo illustrate the various features of the game in comedic ways. By Yoshitaka Nagayama; began in the March 2017 issue.

Unlike Charisma Mission which received a replacement and later official continuation, one Dragon Ball spin-off series has since been phased out entirely after an 11-chapter run: Dragon Ball Discross Divine Power God MAX!! by Katsuki Hirose, which began in the March 2015 issue. This was yet another spin-off series with heroes using the various Dragon World characters and transformations in conjunction with the (now discontinued) Dragon Ball Discross physical arcade game. The chapter’s final page in the November 2016 issue stated, promoting the author’s shift to a new Digimon comic in the same issue:

The Discross battle continues! Thank you for all your support up till now! The author’s next work begins on page 354!

Saikyō Jump has also been known to include bonus chapters of its regular series as well as V-Jump regulars; the July 2014 issue, for example, featured three additional bonus chapters by various artists. The magazine has occasionally included miscellaneous chapter reprints in addition to its standard series. Neko Majin Z‘s first chapter was reprinted in the November 2014 issue followed by the remaining Z chapters one at a time in the next four issues. The first Episode of Bardock chapter was reprinted in the magazine’s third 2011 quarterly issue.

Previous non-manga, promotional content included items such as the June 2014 issue’s “Twel-Boo Mysteries” Q&A session with Akira Toriyama and the March 2014 issue’s “Akira Toriyama Super Q&A“. The March 2012 issue came packed with a bonus DVD containing the Episode of Bardock and Plan to Eradicate the Super Saiyans special features. Each issue generally comes packed with Dragon Ball Heroes cards, a fold-out poster, and other miscellaneous trinkets.

Saikyō Jump is currently released in time for the first weekend of every other month, starting with that year’s January issue releasing in the previous December; for example, the January 2017 issue was released 02 December 2016.

The magazine runs in the ¥400-600 range (roughly $4-6). With shipping from Amazon Japan to most regions within the continental United States, a single issue will run you $15-16. This is roughly the same markup you would pay at a local, stateside Kinokuniya or other Japanese book store. Like most magazines, Saikyō Jump is a first-come, first-served, available-until-gone sort of production. In general, those looking to purchase an upcoming issue are best served by pre-ordering (Amazon Japan / CDJapan).

Dragon Ball SD is the only Dragon Ball-related Saikyō Jump series receiving a collected edition (print/digital), though its first four quarterly chapters were not included.

Weekly Shōnen Jump

Weekly Shōnen Jump (週刊少年ジャンプ) is Shueisha’s main, weekly manga anthology aimed at young boys, and is the publication where Dragon Ball was originally serialized. It is released each Monday in Japan (barring the same holiday schedule as other magazines), with a double-issue for breaks such as New Year’s, Golden Week, Bon Festival, and Christmas. Issues are also forward dated a few weeks; for example, the 2017 #16 issue will hit store shelves 20 March 2017.

These days, Dragon Ball content is generally limited to weekly promotions for upcoming Dragon Ball Super episodes, and the occasional video game preview. Jaco the Galactic Patrolman was serialized in the magazine in 2013.

Previous non-manga, promotional content included items such as the 2013 #14-20 issues’ “Super Long Interview!! Please Tell Us, Akira Toriyama-sensei!!

The magazine runs in the ¥200-300 range (roughly $2-3). Fewer online retailers stock this weekly publication, as its size and cheap paper quality are intended to make it an ephemeral, toss-away product while the individual series’ collected editions are the ones intended for long-term archival.

Other Anime Magazines

Of the various magazines out there, Animage, Animedia, and Newtype are the most popular; these are all generally released on the 10th of each month. These magazines all run in the ¥700-900 range (roughly $7-9). Like Shueisha’s publications, these magazines sell out quickly and should be pre-ordered if you are interested in a particular issue.

While not released by Shueisha themselves, these other anime magazines — particularly when a Dragon Ball series is actually airing on television — occasionally have related promotional content. These days it tends to be summaries and staff listings for upcoming Dragon Ball Super episodes, but in the past included countdowns/lists, interviews, and other special features.

These magazines likewise tend to sell out quickly and should be pre-ordered if a particular issue is desired.

Related and Defunct Shueisha Magazines

While these magazines are not directly related to Dragon Ball, you may see them brought up from time-to-time.

Monthly Shōnen Jump (月刊少年ジャンプ) ran from 1970 to 2007 featuring series such as Claymore, Beet the Vandel Buster, Zenki, and Kekko Kamen. Akira Toriyama’s parody/spin-off series Neko Majin debuted in the magazine for several of its chapters, while other chapters were later reprinted in Monthly Shōnen Jump following their debut in other publications such as Weekly Shōnen Jump.

Jump SQ (ジャンプスクエア or “Jump Square”) served as a semi-replacement for Monthly Shōnen Jump and is aimed at a slightly older audience than Weekly Shōnen Jump. Akira Toriyama and Masakazu Katsura’s first “Galactic Patrol” series, Sachie-chan GOOD!!, appeared in the magazine’s inaugural May 2008 issue.

Weekly Young Jump (週刊ヤングジャンプ) began in 1979 as Shueisha’s seinen (adolescent boys) manga anthology. Akira Toriyama and Masakazu Katsura’s second “Galactic Patrol” series, Jiya, appeared in the magazine in 2010.

Hopefully we have taken a simple question, expanded it in a very long and convoluted way, and brought it back around again to something a bit more understandable!

Published by VegettoEX
15 March 2017, 7:43 PM EDTComment

FUNimation’s online shop has updated with listings for “Part Three” of their Dragon Ball Z Kai: The Final Chapters home video release, hitting DVD and Blu-ray this June.

With their efforts to stop Majin Buu quickly proving futile, the Z Fighters have only one hope against this seemingly invincible foe-the Fusion technique. Will the combined power of two Saiyan warriors be enough to stop Majin Buu once and for all The final battle for the fate of the universe begins!

“The Final Chapters: Part Three” hits store shelves 20 June 2017 for $49.98 MSRP on DVD and $54.98 MSRP on Blu-ray. The three-disc set will cover episodes 145-167 of the Boo arc’s international cut (as opposed to the further-condensed Japanese television broadcast from 2014), wrapping up the “refreshed” series. On-disc extras will include 25 minutes worth of material; for comparison, the first two sets are slated to include commentary tracks as well as creditless versions of the opening and ending themes.

“The Final Chapters: Part One” hits store shelves 25 April 2017 and will cover episodes 99-121. “The Final Chapters: Part Two” hits store shelves 23 May 2017 and will cover episodes 122-144.

FUNimation’s English dub for the Boo arc of Dragon Ball Kai debuted on Cartoon Network back in January. The home release will contain the original Japanese language track (with accompanying English subtitle translations) as well as FUNimation’s English dub. The Boo arc will be presented on home video in a cropped 16:9 widescreen format; unlike the initial arcs of the series that were remastered by Q-TEC and presented in its original 4:3 aspect ratio, Toei opted for an internal remaster for the Boo arc that has been cropped to widescreen from the start.

Thanks to simtek34 for the heads-up.